ANIMAL PROTECTION OF NEW MEXICO INC

Making sure animals matter in every New Mexican community.

aka Animal Protection of New Mexico, Inc.   |   Albuquerque, NM   |  https://www.apnm.org

Mission

APNM's mission is to advocate the rights of animals by effecting systemic change, resulting in the humane treatment of all animals.

Ruling year info

1981

Executive Director

Elisabeth Jennings

Main address

PO Box 11395

Albuquerque, NM 87192 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Sangre de Cristo Animal Protection

EIN

85-0283292

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (D01)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (D05)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Animals in New Mexico are harmed in countless ways either intentionally, through neglect, or because of long-established and stubborn institutions/systems that have not considered the impact of actions on animals.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Challenging Animal Cruelty

Animal Protection of New Mexico (APNM) works to ensure animals matter in every New Mexican community. Each year APNM responds to thousands of New Mexicans who bring animal welfare concerns to our attention.

APNM’s robust, statewide "cruelty case management system” includes an cruelty hotline. Perfection of this system has led to a heightened community awareness and intolerance of animal cruelty and neglect, an engaged and active public that regularly reports animal cruelty, prosecution of and consequences for animal abusers, and relief for animals removed from cruel and neglectful circumstances.

However, challenging animal cruelty doesn’t stop with the day-to-day response to animal cruelty reports from around the state. APNM uses information gathered through the cruelty hotlines to plan and implement its deeper outreach into New Mexican communities in need. Long-term improvement in the wellbeing of animals in New Mexico is driven by the hotlines.

These efforts include:

• creating new programs to address urgent needs, such as safe havens for animals of domestic violence victims and lifesaving services for families struggling to care for horses;

• delivering effective educational outreach to youth and families;

• strengthening local and state animal policies and laws;

• organizing crucial training for law enforcement agencies and others involved in New Mexico’s criminal justice system.

Many people living in other states have said, "I wish we had an APNM in our state.”

Population(s) Served
Adults

Animal Protection of New Mexico (APNM) is committed to providing quality educational services to New Mexicans of all ages and backgrounds, focusing its efforts in communities where animal abuse and neglect is endemic, as measured by the APNM animal cruelty hotline and by media reports, and where opportunities arise. APNM’s educational outreach components include: (a) EDUCATIONAL COMMUNITY PRESENTATIONS: APNM delivers live presentations in Bernalillo County Community centers that use audio-visual aids to imbue upon youth the importance of responsible companion animal care; presentations provide information on the realities of pet overpopulation and the importance of spay/neuter programs; the program collaborates with therapy dog organizations and gives youth the opportunity to observe the proper and careful methods of interaction with companion animals;

(b) SCHOOL BASED INTERVENTIONS: APNM implements 4-week and 12-week pilot programs in targeted elementary schools that teach students to understand the realities involved in caring for animals; lesson plans meet statewide educational standards and benchmarks; students gain empathy for animals and engage in team projects that teach math, research and communication skills; follow up programs are offered to 7th and 11th grade students in the same school system, providing the opportunity to measure longitudinal changes in knowledge and attitudes among the participants;

(c) COMMUNITY OUTREACH: APNM maintains a presence at numerous community events throughout the state; tabling and information dissemination occurs throughout the year at
schools, universities, and community events;

(d) NATIVE AMERICAN COMMUNITY OUTREACH: Upon request, Animal Protection of New Mexico is providing educational outreach to New Mexico's Native American communities.  Areas of interest include:  the availability of spay/neuter and vaccination services, socializing dogs through good stewardship and loose dog/bite safety for children.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Animal Protection of New Mexico (APNM) is committed to protecting from harm New Mexico’s equines, reminding New Mexicans of equines’ crucial role in New Mexico’s history and heritage. Drought and economic recession have contributed greatly to problems for horses and horse owners throughout the state. Reacting to the lack of comprehensive program services for equines in New Mexico, APNM developed two key initiatives:

(a) EQUINE PROTECTION PROGRAM, which seeks to address the long-term needs of equines in New Mexico by creating effective programs that keep equines with their families and out of the
slaughter pipeline;

(b) THE EQUINE PROTECTION FUND (EPF): In 2018 the EPF passed the milestone of bringing relief to over 1,000 equines! The EPF was set up through the New Mexico Community Foundation and makes designated contributions to APNM for the purposes of feed assistance, gelding assistance and veterinary services for equine shelters, individuals and for agencies enforcing animal cruelty laws. APNM processes the applications with a quick turn-around to help struggling families provide quality care for their equines, and to assist shelters and agencies with equine-related assistance. Programs currently available include temporary help feeding equines, subsidies for a veterinarian to geld stallions/jacks, and subsidies for humane euthanasia and disposition of elderly/ill equines. The EPF also maintains a statewide Volunteer Network, caring individuals throughout the state that receive and respond to emails about urgent needs for neighboring equines, which may range from transportation and feed to warming blankets and temporary housing. The EPF seeks to raise additional funds to keep up with high demand for assistance and implement and expand other assistance services. Learn more at www.EquineProtection(http://www.equineprotection/) Fund.org.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Animal Protection of New Mexico
(APNM) is committed to securing the permanent sanctuary of the approximately 53 surviving chimpanzees living at the
Alamogordo Primate Facility. These deserving chimps, who are waiting for some peace and dignity at the end of their lives, have not been used in invasive research since 2001 and have done much more than their share for humankind.

These chimpanzees are in New Mexico because in the 1950s, the United States Air Force shipped baby chimpanzees from Africa to Holloman Air Force Base in Alamogordo, New Mexico, for use in space program testing. After chimps were no longer useful in the
space program, they were used in biomedical testing, and were owned by a series of labs and institutions.

The most infamous biomedical research institution in New Mexico was run by Dr. Frederick Coulston, recipient of many millions in federal and private contracts for cruel and sloppy research. At one point The Coulston Foundation in Alamogordo owned over 600 chimpanzees in a successful effort to become the world’s largest chimpanzee research colony.

In 2000, public pressure about horrific animal deaths and falsified research resulted in formal government sanctions against The Coulston Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health seized
288 chimpanzees and housed them all on Holloman Air Force Base.

 APNM has led a grassroots campaign to permanently retire these chimps, generating public outcry from broad and diverse stakeholders and policymakers. Funding for all chimp research has finally stopped, thanks to the release of an independent scientific study that found most current biomedical research on chimpanzees to be "unnecessary.”

Find out more at www.RetireTheChimps.org

Population(s) Served
Adults

APNM works to promote coexistence between human communities and New Mexico’s wild species, particularly historical "problem” animals including cougar, bear, coyote, beaver, and prairie dog. Reflecting a philosophy of collaboration rather than confrontation, APNM has worked with
governmental agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and the public to create and manage the following programs:
(a) COUGAR SMART NEW MEXICO – A coordinated effort between APNM and state and federal land management agencies to educate on safety when recreating in cougar country and to promote coexistence rather than persecution of New Mexico’s native cougar populations;
(b) LIVIING WITH BEAVERS – APNM has developed resources and materials to assist property owners on resolving conflicts with beaver via nonlethal methods and to promote the ecological benefits of beaver activity;
(c) TRAP FREE NEW MEXICO – APNM is a member of the TrapFreeNM coalition, which seeks to end the cruel, dangerous, and unsustainable practice of trapping and poisoning wildlife on New Mexico’s public lands;
(d) BANNING KILLING CONTESTS - In 2019, APNM and its legislative arm, Animal Protection Voters, as well as many other partners across the state, succeeded in banning coyote killing contests in New Mexico. NM became only the 3rd state to ban these grotesque body-count contests;
(e) WILDLIFE ADVOCACY – APNM works with other advocacy groups, agencies, and the public to promote nonlethal and humane management of wild species whenever possible.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Improving the lives of animals and those who care about them in towns throughout New Mexico through a variety of community-based projects and initiatives: Improving local animal control ordinances; funding law enforcement training for animal control/welfare officers; providing safe and secure fencing so people have alternatives to chaining their dogs; supporting local animal shelters; promoting spay-neuter initiatives. Humane Communities initiatives are pursued in numerous locations, including McKinley, Valencia, Mora, San Miguel, Guadalupe, and Santa Fe Counties.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Through Animal Protection Voters, improving local, state and federal laws that impact animals' lives.

Population(s) Served
Adults

About every four to five years, Animal Protection of New Mexico honors champions for animals in up to 13 categories at its Milagro Awards gala. Honoree categories include Advocacy Award, Animal Award, Direct Animal Services Award, Humane Citizen Award, Media Award, Law Enforcement Award, Humane Education Award, Mary Jane Garcia Champion for Animals Award, Lawmaking Advocacy Award, Board of Directors' Award, Executive Director's Award, Spirit of the Mission Award, Youth Award. A comprehensive documentary is created and published about each winner.

Population(s) Served
Adults

When it comes to animal abuse, there is none more systematic, extensive, or harmful than that perpetrated on farmed animals who wind up as food for Americans. While the misery experienced by farmed animals is unmatched in scope, animal-based food is also responsible for causing unparalleled sickness and death in those who eat animals and their byproducts. In addition, animal agriculture's disastrous contribution to climate-changing methane gas levels in the atmosphere and pollution are well-documented. This combination makes reforming/altering Americans’ diets a significant matter of justice for animals, a matter of planetary survival, and a matter of quality and length of life for humans.

Health statistics in New Mexico mirror national statistics that connect the consumption of animal products with high rates of obesity, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, arthritis, and obesity-related cancer. New Mexico’s challenges with poverty and lack of access to healthy food create additional obstacles that don’t have to–but often do–lead to poor diets that include processed meat and other harmful animal products.

APNM's plant-based eating program promotes the many benefits of plant-based eating and is aimed at reforming the practices within New Mexico institutions that will lead to a meaningful shift in how and what people eat in our state.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of policies formally blocked

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Changing Laws to Change Lives

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Massive push back on NIH decision to not retire chimps to sanctuary

Number of policies formally established

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Building Foundations to Keep Animals Safe

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Spay/Neuter funding mechanism established; CARE services state funding continued; Santa Fe City ban on chaining & established extreme weather provisions; NMDGF wildlife euthanasia policy.

Number of community events or trainings held and attendance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Humane education presentations, Animal Control Officer/Law enforcement training, Lobby training/outreach, Plant-based eating events & demonstrations, virtual town hall events.

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Equine Protect. Fund, Cruelty Hotline, CARE helpline, Education programs, straw fund, Lobby training, S/N clinics, Humane Communities, chimps to sanctuary, plant-based eating demos/training, website.

Number of law enforcement agencies assisted in animal cruelty cases

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Challenging Animal Cruelty

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of rewards offered in conjunction with law enforcement agencies. Two cases related to horses, one horse stabbed and butchered and two others shot at.

Number of program/model/intervention innovations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Process documentation, system security, budget discipline, Equine and APNM endowment growth, continuous improvement, data collection, virtual fundraising and donor stewardship, new CRM.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Ensuring crimes against animals are taken seriously, elevating animal protection issues in the public consciousness, institutionalizing the humane treatment of animals/conservation of wildlife and funding for it, challenging the use of government resources to harm animals.

Seek collaboration, address relevant issues, garner diversified support, establish infrastructure and create/implement effective solutions, remove barriers to change, engage advocates in policy-making, recognize partners and champions. Adhere to a discipline in which every employee and contractor has production goals that collectively support the organization's mission.

APNM's staff members and long-term contractors have extensive experience in non-profit management, financial management, outreach, education, advocacy, public engagement and creating solutions to public policy issues. APNM has been in business since 1979, and its budget has been consistently increasing since the organization's inception. APNM has established a healthy operating reserve to ensure financial stability, has established a supporting organization since 2001 for financial stability (called APNM Foundation), and created a legislative arm, Animal Protection Voters, in 2002 to augment its program implementation. This combined "suite" of organizations creates a strategic depth and breadth that has ensured success on almost every campaign/program pursued in recent years. APNM has an uncanny ability to create broad and diverse coalitions that lead to success.

In the last decade:

Helped over 2,500 equines, created equine fund in NM Livestock Board, secured $250,000 for horse shelters, created equine tax check-off, created bilingual Equine Care guide, gave equine cruelty investigation training, thwarted attempt to open horse slaughter plant.

Created helpline, NM network of >100 facilities to provide safe haven to animals of domestic violence victims, secured $50,000/year state $ for program, assisted hundreds of families/animals with lifesaving referrals/direct services. Launched Humane Communities initiatives (Valencia, San Miguel, Santa Fe, Mora, McKinley Counties (supporting shelters, communities).

Banned cockfighting & horse tripping, coyote killing contests, passed felony animal cruelty law, created Animal Sheltering Board (ensuring humane euthanasia of dogs/cats), created tax check-off for spay-neuter, passed spay/neuter funding mechanism, passed antifreeze safety law. Killed several bills bad for animals (anti-whistleblower bill, pro-slaughter bills, bill to remove cougar protections, right to hunt).

Staff full-time animal cruelty hotline (handle ~500 calls/year), created cruelty investigations training manual & distributed to every law enforcement officer in state. Anti-cruelty investigation training given to hundreds across 82 agencies. Established 3 equipment caches for large-scale cases like hoarding, animal fighting. Offer rewards to solve cruelty cases.

Led robust campaign that led to NIH's decision to stop invasive research on chimps in US. Dozens now safe in sanctuary.

Deliver 12-wk & 4-wkk The Animal Connection curriculum directly tied to education department requirements, reach over 800 people annually in schools & elsewhere.

Created information on practical solutions to beaver problems, created Cougar Smart New Mexico poster/material to teach public how to safely live/recreate in cougar country. Distributed thousands of educational backpack tags to students. Sued agencies to stop cougar trapping.

Financials

ANIMAL PROTECTION OF NEW MEXICO INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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ANIMAL PROTECTION OF NEW MEXICO INC

Board of directors
as of 9/22/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Anne Coller

No Affiliation

Anne Coller

No Affiliation

Tom Alexander

No Affiliation

Dr. Susan Diaz

No Affiliation

Joan David

No Affiliation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/08/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/12/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.