Santa Fe Children's Museum

Discovering the joys of learning, play, and community.

Santa Fe, NM   |  www.santafechildrensmuseum.org

Mission

The Santa Fe Children's Museum: Discovering the joys of learning, play, and community. We at the Santa Fe Children's Museum believe that children have the right to reach their greatest potential. We recognize children's capacity to construct their own knowledge in an environment that provides for honest inquiry and real discovery. We also value the human need to socialize. To that end we have created a place of warmth and color, a learning laboratory whose exhibit and programs are designed to cultivate habit of inquiry that will last a lifetime; invite manipulation, exploration, and experimentation; and present challenges to children and adults alike.

Ruling year info

1985

Executive Director

Hannah Hausman

Main address

1050 Old Pecos Trail Santa Fe Children's Museum

Santa Fe, NM 87505 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

85-0335070

NTEE code info

Children's Museums (A52)

Single Organization Support (A11)

Arts Education/Schools (A25)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Santa Fe Children’s Museum was founded on a commitment to “Access for All.” We provide these accommodations through our operating budget, and grants help us to extend the offerings. Economic challenges present one type of barrier to education, but others come in the form of location, language, parental availability, and special needs, to name a few. We work to reduce these impacts and to ensure that the Museum is available to everyone in the community. According to Kids Count 2019, NM now ranks 49th in child poverty in the nation. Young children, and Hispanic and Native American children all fare worse on the child poverty indicator. These heartbreaking statistics challenge us to ensure access to quality out of school learning opportunities such as our Title 1 Field Trips and the Stargazer Program which serve over 2,000 students each year from more than a dozen counties.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Early Childhood

Education programs sponsored by the museum allow us to take a leadership role of issues concerning children in our community. We believe that both children and adults learn best when actively engaged through hands-on projects or "minds-on" discussions. Programs are designed to reflect the interests of children, parents, and educators and to be accessible to the greatest number of Santa Feans. Both on- and off-site programs are designed to be 12) interactive, 2) involving, 3) relevant t our constituency, 4) developmentally appropriate, 5) accessible, and 6) collaborative in nature. They include: artists-and-scientists in the museum; museum-on-wheels, serving children undergoing medical treatment; summer camps; outdoor and environmental education and more.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of paid admissions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Early Childhood

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of free admissions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Early Childhood

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of audience members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Early Childhood

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Early Childhood

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

122 Individual Donors 92 Business Donors 31 Foundation Donors

Number of free participants on field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Early Childhood

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of fields trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Early Childhood

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students educated through field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Age groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We work to reduce these impacts and to ensure that the Museum is available to everyone in the community, as reflected in 3 types of programs:

Community Access is ensured by our bilingual staff, who offer economic assistance through::
Discounts every day for 7669 SNAP recipients, military and first responder, teachers and more.
Extended evening hours and free admission for 1811 children after 4:00 pm on Thursdays.
Camp Scholarships this year for 34 kids who receive free or reduced-cost lunch at school.
347 complimentary admissions and 53 free annual memberships through our community partners.
Evening art and science hands-on education at shelters, libraries, schools and community centers.

Schoolchildren Access is promoted to educators who request our offerings so that:
1,236 kids from 31 schools came for free field trips in the 2018-2019 school year
9,586 children enjoyed Stargazer’s innovative bilingual program in 82 schools!
Students who participate in field trips or Stargazer receive a free one-year Student Membership.

Special Needs Access is provided by our bilingual staff, who are trained in sensory-sensitive practices.
Sensory-Friendly Sundays, with dim lights, quiet atmosphere, and other supports occur monthly, plus events such as sensory Easter Egg Hunt presented with our partner organizations.
Sensory-friendly tools are available every day on our website and at the front desk.
Aids for blind and deaf children are planned and coming soon.

Through our Title 1 Field Trips and Stargazer Program, schoolchildren explore science and create art at more than 35 exhibits in the Museum and off-site STEM education through our portable planetarium. Field Trips at the Museum are designed to support the critical educational work that teachers (and parents!) do daily with students. The Museum provides tangible, highly engaging ways for children to apply what they learn in school and for them to be inspired to learn more. Our exhibits and programs are designed by teams of former classroom teachers, disciplinary experts, and exhibit fabricators. Each exhibit is aligned with grade levels in mind.

Stargazer, our portable planetarium, brings innovative STEM education to rural schools throughout Northern New Mexico. In Stargazer, 2,500 Native American children a year explore the Cosmos without leaving their schools. Specifically, Title 1 and Pueblo Schools, K-6 located in Northern NM will benefit from this request. Counties served through this program include: Santa Fe, Pojaque, Santo Domingo Pueblo, Espanola, Albuquerque, Los Alamos, Santa Cruz, Las Vegas, Ribera, Ohkay Owingeh, Chama, Rio Rancho, Pecos, Tohatchi and Las Cruces. Increased funding will allow for expansion into other counties. The short-term goal for 2020-21 is to serve 12,000 school children. The long-term goal is to serve 25,000 kids each year, creating in them a desire to learn which ultimately improves academic success

The Santa Fe Children’s Museum is perhaps the only non-profit educational and cultural institution in Santa Fe committed to serving the needs and interests of children by providing exhibits and programs that stimulate curiosity and motivate learning. The Museum caters to children ages 0-10, providing embedded curriculum in science, art, and humanities in each weekly program, out of school time camp, and self-facilitated learning-through-play experience.

Our target is educational success for all children, but we realize that kids from disadvantaged backgrounds and neighborhoods are likely most affected by the current shortcomings in education.

Because geography plays a significant role, we launched Stargazer, our bilingual portable planetarium, which travels throughout Northern New Mexico, visiting 2 or 3 schools each week. In 2018, 4,805 students experienced Stargazer in almost 40 public schools. An additional 3,295 children and their families flew in Stargazer in the Museum and at partners throughout the community. Altogether Stargazer directly impacts over 10,000 visitors a year!

The below represents how we served our community in 2019 at the Santa Fe Children’s Museum. Our future goals include: increasing funding for our access for all initiative and all operations of the Museum, opening a Southside Santa Fe Museum location and increasing our numbers served overall.

59,000 Visitors

8,344 Free or Discounted Admissions, offered daily, plus
1,811 Kids free on Thursday afternoons

39 Title I Schools hosted for Free Field Trips, and
26 Non- Title I School Field trips which included
1,981 Children, who also received a free student membership for the entire year

10,969 Kids and their adults experiencing Stargazer, our portable planetarium
(22,033 since inception in February 2018)
81 Public Schools throughout Northern New Mexico visited by Stargazer, for free
116 Bilingual star shows presented in Stargazer

159 Kids attended camp
27 Received full or partial scholarships

372 Active Family Memberships
31 Free Family Memberships

17 Partner Organizations in the Community
439 Admissions through these Partnerships
11 Free Birthday Parties

89 Volunteers
3,029 Volunteer Hours

122 Individual Donors
92 Business Donors
31 Foundation Donors

2720 Birthday party attendees

Financials

Santa Fe Children's Museum
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Santa Fe Children's Museum

Board of directors
as of 10/25/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Caitlin Brodsky

Sharon Woods

Paul Macks

Olivia Sloan

Melanie Maxon

Jessica Perea

Michaelann Perea

First National Mortgage

Bill Primrose

Donna Ralph

Marisa Ornelas

Enterprise Bank and Trust

Abenacio Baldonado

Think NM

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/22/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/22/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.