El Calvario United Methodist Church

Las Cruces, NM   |  http://elcalvarioumc.org/

Mission

Located on the U.S.-Mexico border, at major cross-roads going north, east, and west, El Calvario has always been a place to address needs of vulnerable populations. Below is a recap of what we are doing with the help of your generosity: Our Agape Market – where we feed, clothe and provide a place of gathering for our Community. Hospitality Center – Families with children fleeing danger have been allowed to legally enter, after being vetted by U. S. authorities to seek asylum. With the help of 150 volunteers and your support, we have been able to help over 1,800 refugees (including 800 children) in 2018-19. Immigrant Advocacy Center – provide advocacy, education, case management and free or low cost legal aid to migrants in our community.

Ruling year info

2016

Pastor and Director

Rev George Miller

Main address

316 N. Campo St.

Las Cruces, NM 88001 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

85-0351974

NTEE code info

Immigrants' Rights (R21)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is not required to file an annual return with the IRS because it is a church.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Systematic economic and social injustice that causes people to migrate and greets them when they arrive. With more people becoming displaced and fewer being able to return, an increasing number find themselves in an new and protracted displacement. Most of the families remain underserved, and through lack of access to quality education and work opportunities, for example, general poverty ensues and brings related family stress and other social issues. Included are a broad range of deficits and difficulties which together make it very hard for many (at least 50% children) in the population to develop the skills and habits needed to escape a cycle of under privilege and to become fully self-sufficient, engaged and contributing residents. A resultant poverty trap/ “deprivation of basic capabilities” is found in much of our client community, and is particularly acute in Immigrant populations, which is our primary focus group. The Covid-19 Pandemic uncovers/exacerbates the reality.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Immigrant Advocacy Center

The El Calvario Immigrant Advocacy Center’s core objective is to provide life-nurturing services for our community, especially the most vulnerable. We are not only a place of hospitality for migrant communities, but we also advocate for those denied services and due process. In fact, our specific mission is to intervene in tangible ways with the judicial system, immigration, law enforcement, and social services, enabling the most vulnerable to move from the margins to centers of power and access.
To do this work, we denounce and seek to transform the systemic causes of suffering and injustice, while we personally nurture, educate, and work for each individual and family. This two-pronged approach is based on the principle that addressing injustices and enabling human flourishing are not simply social, political, or economic matters but theological events and spiritual issues.
We excise something of our own souls when we fail to welcome the stranger, especially those who are direct neighbors living in our midst. In reality, our self-built walls do not keep us safe; rather, when we neglect the vulnerability of others, we lose touch with our own vulnerability, forgetting our interconnectedness and the sources of our real well-being.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
People of Latin American descent

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of sheltered persons

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Immigrant Advocacy Center

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Total depend on current government policies. Sheltered families/persons were all legally released to our Center by the Federal Government.

Number of emergency meals provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Immigrant Advocacy Center

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Individual meals served to sheltered Asylum Seekers. Target population varies widely based on government policies.

Number of products distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants, Detainees

Related Program

Immigrant Advocacy Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Emergency Travel kits to accompany/sustain family/individual from shelter to sponsor location.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our mission is to serve the POOR, the STRANGER, and the CAPTIVE (Matthew 25). We accomplish this by providing a platform which helps establish a full abundant, life and restore dignity, capacity, resilience and hope to those we come in contact with.

All poverty arises from a complex set of interrelated causes, often tied to failures in politics and governance along with systematic marginalization of minorities, migrants, and—almost universally across cultures—women. So as each family situation is different, making broad solutions likewise difficult. However we believe we can use current research (including our own), to point to an emerging set of scalable, science-based solutions that can break the trap. Moreover, we use the research to develop organization policy which will implement on the ground practical and measurable solutions. Some solutions will be „emergency“ activity to deal with immediate needs, such as food, shelter,clothing, etc. Sustainable solutions will take a more wrap-around approach where our organization will walk alongside our clients in addressing their more long-term sustainability needs.

We are providing basic „emergency“ services such as food, clothing, shelter, transportation, financial assistance, social and medical services from our shelter, the only such permanent facility in Southern New Mexico to help alleviate the immediate needs of our community.

Longer term, we are forming more inclusive sustainable development solutions through our Immigrant Advocacy Center. These solutions are based on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all. They address the global challenges we face, including those related to poverty, inequality, climate change, environmental degradation, peace and justice. The 17 Goals, all interconnected, and in order to leave no one behind, we feel it is important that we work on the SDGs we directly can influence in our region.

Case workers will provide an inclusive sequenced set of services tailored to culture/context/population giving a one-time boost to break the poverty trap/ “deprivation of basic capabilities” found in our client community. These interventions include livelihood training, transfers of cash and productive assets, and encouragement of savings, all facilitated through in-person coaching. Either through direct services, or through our partners, we will provide free/low cost legal services, education, visiting those in detention, and advocacy support as well.

The role of the coach is key, for these programs to build hope. Each participant is assigned a caseworker or coach tasked with conducting regular individual check-ins, typically at the participant’s home (currently remotely). The coach meets regularly with small groups of participants who live in the same common neighborhood. In the group setting, participants learn from and receive encouragement from one another. These recurring touchpoints remind the participant that change is possible and support will be available along the way. The entire program is notably time-bound, usually running for about two years, during which a person living in dire poverty can be expected to transform his or her life, “graduating” onto the economic ladder—at least to the bottom rung of it—where he or she will enjoy a degree of control and independence, often for the first time in his or her life. Emphasis is on the participants to lead their own progress, with the knowledge that at the end of the two-year period, they will be on their own. If this progress stalls, the caseworker will be there to help.

The organization will conduct research concerning issues affecting our target community and suggest and drive advocacy, education and direct support programs offered by the Center

We supported by a number of our own Church organizations, partner churches and a broad based national donor base. We have a dynamic board structure that has a heart for this work and is actively engaged. Our staff is small but growing and who are committed to the long-term success of our organization and programs. Currently we are operating with approximately 150 regular volunteers. We have successfully accessed a number of grants to both develop and sustain our operations and strategic growth. Many of us are members of our client community ourselves and know the issues personally and also the way to solutions. Our small facility has grown with grown via donation, grants and hard work from all of our volunteers and renovation and construction plans expected to be completed in 2020 will provide the sustainable capacity base to conduct our operations as the only permanent shelter and Immigrant Advocacy Center in Southern New Mexico. We have a strong reputation in the community

Summary of Activities
Shelter
Data January to December 31, 2019
No. individuals 1,770
No. Families 832
No. shelter nights 4,143
Meals served 12,429
Gender
Male 935
Female 835
Age
0-6 years 392
7-12 years 272
13-18 years 247
19-59 years 856
60+ 3
Juarez Ministry
Bridge services. Once the number of families released declined in July 2019, we started supporting those families stranded by the Juarez bridges. On September 17, 2019, we “adopted” the families that were camping by the Paso Del Norte bridge in Juarez (downtown bridge), by providing a home-style meal and hygiene supplies, blankets, coats and other items as needed. ; We also brought a nurse that checked persons and need and started doing activities with the children.
Escuelita- Started as once a week activities and classes and later grew to daily 2/hr classes for immigrant children living by the bridge. 30 children per class on average.
Pan de Vida Shelter- The activities at the bridge stopped on January 7, 2020 when the Mexican authorities removed the families from the streets. We then adopted Pan de Vida Shelter in Anapra, Juarez. This is one of the larges shelters for immigrants in Juarez and hosts, on average between 160 to 200 immigrants.
We did weekly visits to the shelter, bringing bulk food, hygiene and medical supplies. We also started conducting stress and trauma relieving sessions with the adults and activities with the children. Due to COVID 19, we stopped the visits to Juarez but continued supporting with food and supplies and financial contributions. We opened a supermarket card in Juarez and deposit funds regularly, we paid their past due water bills.
All Juarez activities have been funded through individual contributions and donations plus a $1,000 grant from a foundation.
TOTALS
No. meals served at bridge 2,235
Children served- Escuelita
Food supplies- no. people at Juarez shelter 2,090
Immigrant Relief Fund
Launched the “Check Challenge” in April 15 to raise funds to set up an immigrant relief fund. The purpose is to support families that were financially affected by COVID, lost their jobs and don’t have access to unemployment and/or government benefits.
Process: promoted program among organizations, churches local groups and businesses. Once receive referrals are received we conduct an intake, present the case to a committee for a recommendation and disburse funds.
Funds raised: Individual contributions $25,888 Grants $35,000
No. Families Assisted 34
Total $ Disbursed $18,926
Housing (rent/mortgage) $14,063
Utility Bills $2,160
Food Cards $2,072
Other (medical, etc.) $631

Agape Market
This is an event for community members where we distribute food (200 25lb fresh vegetables and fruit boxes per week), clothing and meals.

Financials

El Calvario United Methodist Church
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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El Calvario United Methodist Church

Board of directors
as of 12/16/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

George Miller

Barry Thatcher

New Mexico State University

Janet Smith

Anayeli Lopez

New Mexico State University

Margaret Brown

AVID (Advocate Visitors with Immigrants in Detention)

Samuel Steele

Doctor

Marlene Yanez

La Semilla

Tiffany Gonzales

Dir, MCH

Nicole Goodman

MSW, MCH

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/12/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/16/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.