Tomorrow's Women

Courage. Leadership. Change

aka Creativity for Peace   |   Santa Fe, NM   |  https://tomorrowswomen.org/

Mission

Tomorrow's Women trains young Palestinian and Israeli women to partner as leaders by transforming anger and prejudice to mutual respect, facilitating an understanding of the other, and inspiring action to promote equality, peace and justice for all.

Ruling year info

1989

Principal Officer

Tarrie Burnett

Main address

369 Montezuma Ave no. 566

Santa Fe, NM 87501 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Creativity for Peace

EIN

85-0366087

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

International Peace and Security (Q40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Israelis and Palestinians live in a small geographic area but have few or no opportunities to know one another. The perception they have of the "other" is of people who hate them and want them out of their land. There is no possibility of peace between these people if there is no understanding or trust. Our work is based on a great deal of research that proves the power of relationship-building in the work of peace. We focus exclusively on young women because of their ability to achieve compassion and open-mindedness and because of their proven skills as leaders and peacemakers.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Summer Peace Program

Each summer, Tomorrow's Women brings 16 young women, ages 15-17 from Palestine and Israel, to Santa Fe for a three-week immersion program. Girls participate in daily dialogue sessions, led by trained facilitators from Israel and Palestine, in which they learn to speak authentically and listen compassionately. Healing takes place as they share their personal stories with the "enemy.” The afternoon art program is led by professional art therapists and includes projects in all visual art disciplines that promote self-expression, healing, and collaboration. In addition, participants take field trips and spend many hours of social time together. They live communally and are assigned bedrooms with young women from the other side. The camp experience shatters the stereotypes they have been taught and transforms distrust and anger into compassion and friendship.

Population(s) Served

Young women who participate in our summer program make a two-year commitment to training and practice. They attend six weekend seminars focused on learning about gender, visioning, conflicting media and historical narratives and organizing social justice projects of their choosing.

Population(s) Served

Programs that teach young people nonviolent conflict resolution and leadership skills.

Population(s) Served

Selected academic scholarships to young women in our program with financial need and high leadership/peacemaking potential

Population(s) Served

Each year we organize gatherings to which all our young women are invited. These might include mother/daughter seminars, emotional resilience training or meetings with a specific focus, such as writing and performing a song about peace.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Alliance for Middle East Peace 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of campers enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Summer Peace Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of camps offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Summer Peace Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

At Tomorrow’s Women, we believe that peace cannot be realized through force. We define peace not only as an absence of violence but also as the affirmative democratic and ongoing process of creating a culture in which all people’s rights are respected equally. We are training the next generation of female leaders and peacemakers in Palestine and Israel, by teaching young women how to lead in partnership with someone they previously viewed as their enemy. We are giving young women in many fields the tools to change the future for themselves and their people, demonstrating that peace in this seemingly intractable struggle is possible.

We acknowledge that we operate in a reality of occupation, in which the balance of power between two peoples is not equal. Individuals involved with our work hold many different ideas about political solutions but share a commitment to non-violence and the conviction that peace is possible.

We reject cynicism, hopelessness, victim mentality, and other self-defeating positions that serve as barriers to action. We have faith in the integrity and power of each individual and her potential to make change as well as the collective responsibility to work towards social justice and an end to the conflict.

Women’s perspectives, experience, and voices are currently under-represented in the peace process. Following resolution 1325 of the United Nations, we dedicate our work to women, believing that they will lead the change.

THEREFORE, in our organization, we will:

-Respect the dignity of every human being and the right of all to live in peace.
-Listen with compassion to all points of view.
-Empower our young women to lead.
-Strive for the courage to speak and act on behalf of peace, equality, and justice for all.

The cornerstones of our methodology are intensive dialogue and therapeutic art. The introduction to our work is learning to speak authentically and listen compassionately. The second step is developing tools for emotional resiliency in order to maintain work for peace as long as necessary. Advanced tools include opportunities to practice leadership and peacemaking in the real world, including with our organization, and always partnering an Israeli and a Palestinian.

DIALOGUE METHODOLOGY

 Authentic speaking: we don’t blame, we don’t stereotype, we speak using “I” and from our personal experience

 Compassionate listening: we actively and deeply listen, we are open to others’ point of view, while someone is speaking we are not thinking of our rebuttal

 We do not “debate” or “negotiate”; we share our most deeply held thoughts and feelings. We come from the heart first, not the head.

 We create a safe space. Everything is confidential and remains in the dialogue room. Others’ feelings are not judged.

 We practice sharing, even when it is very painful. Everyone’s voice is important.

 Healing comes from expressing our feelings in the circle with our “enemy” and seeing that everyone cares, regardless of whether they are Israeli or Palestinian.

 Dialogue exercises are designed to promote:

o Responsible and compassionate communication skills, i.e. how do I express in a way that is honest but which
will not prevent others from hearing
o The necessity of expressing one’s truth, no matter how painful
o The need to be non-judgmental, to put aside assumptions about the “other”
o Regulation of emotions, i.e. how to express rage or pain without alienating others or hurting ourselves
o Self-care and resiliency; how to hold on to hope despite a potential lifetime of setbacks
o Leading with the other side. Identifying common goals. Exploring what it means to partner with your “enemy”
o Friendship. We have more in common with one another than differences
o Self-empowerment; developing the skills needed to take effective action

 We emphasize that girls are not responsible for the past, for political problems, for their governments. We encourage them to speak about their personal experience and feelings - what they have seen and how they felt.

 Transformation begins in dialogue and continues outside of the formal process, for instance during social activities and “down time.” Once young women know each other it is impossible to stereotype or hate. As the Quaker peace activist Gene Knudsen Hoffman has written, “An enemy is a person whose story we have not heard.”

 Dialogue is a cornerstone of all our work. It provides the foundation for the activism and social justice work we encourage. We are fostering peacemakers who are articulate, empowered, compassionate, and self-aware women.

 Our dialogue process is constantly evolving along with our participants. Each member of the staff takes responsibility for contributing equally.

1. We have a highly experienced and committed team of women in New Mexico, Israel and Palestine who consider this work a calling.

2. Our board of directors has grown incrementally. Directors work at every level to understand the complexity of the conflict and support the organization, participants, and staff. Board giving constitutes approximately 15 percent of our total income.

3. Since 2003 we have organized 21 summer programs for 300+ young women in the United States.

4. Our year-long leadership training program in Israel/Palestine has greatly expanded. In the past three years, nearly 100% of camper graduates remain committed to this work.

5. We are the only organization in the field of grassroots peacemaking in Israel/Palestine that has continuously worked across borders with women.

We have grown and become more effective at every level -- programmatically, financially, structurally. For four consecutive years we have received a good management certificate for our operations in Israel.

We are proud of recent funding from USAID for our Women Building a Politics of Peace program, which trains young Israelis and Palestinians at early stages of careers in politics to be peacemakers. We are expanding our reach, for instance teaching our proven reconciliation techniques to 20 Arab and Jewish high school girls in the municipality of Matte Asher, Israel.

Many of our young women have remained committed to our work for more than a decade, which is extraordinary given the challenges of living in war and the changes that young people experience from their teens through their late twenties.

Working in the complexity of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict presents many challenges -- financial, logistical, emotional -- over which we have no control. Our aspirations -- to train young women to make peace between their people -- are very lofty. We may not see the results for decades.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We are offering an on-going leadership program for our older alumnae and we changed the name of our organization based on participant feedback about the challenges inherent to having the word peace in our founding name.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Tomorrow's Women
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Tomorrow's Women

Board of directors
as of 11/2/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Sue Breslauer

No affiliation

Term: 2013 - 2021

Sue Breslauer

Consultant (Retired)

Shaza Anderson

Unaffiliated

Sam Hocking

Accountant, Business Owner

Lamia Faruki

Realtor

Tony Gerlicz

Retired School Principal

Todd Lopez

Attorney

Ruth Kovnat

Attorney (Retired)

Sue Barnum

Psychotherapist

Sandra Wechsler

Unaffiliated

Barbara Gudwin

Unaffiliated

Rob Elliott

Unaffiliated

Pamela Blackwell

Policy and Communications Director, NM Hospital Association

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/02/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/02/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.