Espanola Humane

more love per paw

aka Espanola Humane   |   Espanola, NM   |  www.espanolahumane.org

Mission

To improve the lives of animals in underserved communities.

Ruling year info

1993

Executive Director

Bridget Lindquist

Main address

108 Hamm Pkwy

Espanola, NM 87532 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

85-0406234

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Española Humane serves an impoverished area where the number of unwanted animals is distressingly high. In affluent communities, such as nearby Los Alamos, shelter intake is about one unwanted animal per sixty households; in our service area the number is approximately one per five. A further consequence of poverty in the area is that humane care is beyond the economic reach of many households. The high number of unwanted animals is overwhelming local shelters in northern New Mexico and, in most cases, animals are euthanized for a lack of space. We have decreased the number of unwanted animals at our shelter through high-volume spay/neuter, and believe it is the only real, sustainable way for communities to end the euthanasia of healthy and treatable animals.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

All are welcome

Open admissions, no-fee animal shelter

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Indigenous peoples

Free spay/neuter surgeries, vaccinations, and microchips

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Indigenous peoples

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of pets microchipped

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Free for Locals

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We microchip every animal received at our shelter and every pet that is spayed/neutered through our clinic. Microchips are a critical way of returning lost but loved pets to their guardians.

Average number of animals spayed and neutered per day

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Free for Locals

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Free for Locals

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average number of days of shelter stay for cats and small animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

All are welcome

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average number of days of shelter stay for dogs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

All are welcome

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animals returned to their owner

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of animals receiving subsidized or free spay/neuter services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Free for Locals

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of sheltered animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

All are welcome

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Española Humane currently works with residents in Rio Arriba County, northern Santa Fe County, and the pueblos of Ohkay Owingeh, San Ildefonso and Santa Clara. Our primary goal is to reduce the number of unwanted dogs and cats through free spay/ neuter surgeries and vaccinations. Put simply, too many unwanted animals are born and too few are adopted. Underpinning the goal are two measurable strategies:

1. Complete an average of 6,500 free spay/neuter surgeries per year in underserved areas that are located within 20 miles of the shelter; and
2. Reduce the intake of unwanted animals at the shelter by 70 percent over the next five years.

Our “Pet Amigos” outreach program helps to reduce the number of unwanted animals by encouraging free spay/neuter surgeries. To reach the “low hanging fruit” (pet owners already motived but with insufficient resources), we will informally partner with churches, senior centers and youth groups to help spread the word about free spay/neuter surgeries. The local Sonic Drive-Ins and Family Dollar discount stores will stuff bags with our spay/neuter leaflets.

For the “higher-hanging fruit,” we will deploy our Pet Amigos team. The bilingual team goes door-to-door in targeted neighborhoods, shaking hands and meeting people, providing advice on animal humane issues, and encouraging residents to take advantage of our offer to alter and vaccinate their pets for free. The team has initially targeted the City of Española, which accounts for the highest number of surrenders at the shelter.

Most of our management team has been working together for years. Bridget Lindquist joined Española Humane in 2005 and inherited an overwhelmed shelter staff in an aging facility with a live release rate of 56 percent. Bridget recruited highly skilled talent and “incentivized” the staff to increase adoptions and spay/neuter. Española Humane continued to be an open-admissions shelter, refusing to turn away any animal, but these days our live release rate is 80 percent.

Dr. Tom has worked with our organization for seven years and was the mobile van surgeon for a neighboring shelter before that. Dr. Tom has a passion for low-cost, high-quality, large volume clinics and has visited Humane Alliance in North Carolina to learn their techniques. He has worked as a volunteer surgeon with the HSUS RAVS team on remote Native American lands in Arizona as well as with World Vets doing free rural clinics in Nicaragua and Peru.

Gretchen Yost, DVM has been with our organization since 2007 and was medical director until 2012. Dr. Gretchen is also a spay/neuter surgeon who has done volunteer work with World Vets in Nicaragua. As a former electrical engineer, she has a keen interest in data interpretation and statistical reporting. She took the lead role in securing and completing all required follow-up reporting for our major spay/neuter grant applications.

Our Director of Operations, Karina Exell, came to us from PAWS Chicago where she developed a community outreach program that accomplished 773 spay/neuter surgeries in the first year. Karina has also directed the operations of two veterinary hospitals, managing teams as large as 29 staff and seven veterinarians. Her focus at Española Humane is improving the accessibility of spay/neuter services.

We have made great progress—from about 2,800 annual surgeries a few years ago to over 4,603 in 2021. In 2022, we hope to expand Pet Amigos into further communities within our service area. Eventually and ideally, as our shelter's intake decreases due to our success in addressing the animal overpopulation problem, we will need to spend less money sheltering animals. Initially, this has not happened and will not happen for a time, as we spend more per intake by treating more illness and giving more time for adoption. However, over years of decreasing intake we expect that there will be some savings, and these savings will contribute to our ability to continue offering free sterilizations.

Financials

Espanola Humane
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Espanola Humane

Board of directors
as of 05/07/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Lea Ann Knight

Financial planning

Term: 2026 - 2020

Ardith Eicher

Retired marketing executive

Mike Hodges

Corporate finance/equity

Gayle Mills

Biotech consultant

Terry Riley

Retired psychologist

Carlos Duno

Retired executive recruiter

Britt Klein

Real estate agent

Edie Gonzales

Financial services

John Brunett

Retired investment officer

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/6/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data