NEW MEXICO WILDERNESS ALLIANCE

aka New Mexico Wild   |   Albuquerque, NM   |  www.nmwild.org

Mission

The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance is a non-profit 501(C)(3), grassroots, environmental organization dedicated to the protection, restoration, and continued enjoyment of New Mexico's wildlands and Wilderness areas. The primary goal of the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance is to ensure the protection and restoration of all remaining wild lands in New Mexico through administrative designations, federal Wilderness designation, and on-going advocacy.

Ruling year info

1999

Principal Officer

Mr. Mark Allison

Main address

317 Commercial St NE Ste 300

Albuquerque, NM 87102 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

85-0457916

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

Land Resources Conservation (C34)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As New Mexico Wild supporters know, Wilderness area designation is the conservation gold standard and the highest level of protection for federal public lands. It literally takes an act of Congress to create “Big W” Wilderness. The Wilderness Act of 1964 honors our history and our cultural heritage. Wilderness helps our watersheds and air quality and the overall health of our planet. Wilderness provides critical habitat for threatened species and supports biodiversity. With less than 3 percent of New Mexico’s total land area protected as Wilderness, we at New Mexico Wild are working hard to build support for permanent protections of millions more acres of wild public lands. Without formal protection, these special places that New Mexicans care so much about face oil and gas development, mining, commercial logging, off-road vehicles, road building and other threats that would destroy the very things we love about our public lands.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

New Mexico Wilderness Alliance

The primary goal of the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance is to ensure the protection and restoration of all remaining wild lands in New Mexico through administrative designations, federal Wilderness designation, and on-going advocacy. To do this, we employ the following programs: Grassroots Organizing, Wilderness Awareness, Coalition Building, Wilderness Inventory, Wilderness Protection, and Membership Development. Each program has its own objective, but jointly our programs are designed to help accomplish the overall long-term goal of Wilderness protection.

Population(s) Served
Adults

New Mexico Wilderness Alliance's Wilderness Outreach Program reaches tens of thousands of people through our quarterly newsletter, radio interviews, public presentations, community outreach, conferences and special events.  All of these contacts with the public stress the importance of wild public lands and their role in our society, economy and culture.

Population(s) Served
Adults

New Mexico Wilderness Alliance's Wilderness Protection Program works to restore and preserve wilderness characteristics and values of our wild public lands.  From volunteer service projects to monitoring agency management of public lands, the work of our staff and volunteers ensures that the best public lands are inventoried, monitored, protected, and restored.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Improving the management of public lands. Expenses include a range of legal oversight and "watchdog”
activities to hold agencies continuously accountable for managing lands consistent with relevant statutes, regulations, rules, and management plans and proposals.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Finalist (Wild Guide), Southwest Book Design & Production Awards for Excellence 2013

New Mexico Book Association

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The primary goal of the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance is to ensure the protection and restoration of all remaining wild lands in New Mexico.

We work to protect wilderness through administrative designations, federal Wilderness designation, and on-going advocacy. NM Wild works directly with local communities, the New Mexico federal political delegation, local politicians, and local businesses and groups to gain support for our campaigns.

We have staff members located across the state who work in their communities to further our progress on our wilderness campaigns. Much of our work involves collaborating with and educating the New Mexico federal delegation in order to get wilderness and public lands bills introduced into Congress. Our campaign staff members also spend much of their time on the ground gaining support for our proposals from local communities and groups. We have been able to secure letters of support for our various campaigns from a number of diverse stakeholders including the Latino/Hispanic community, diverse scholars, Land Grant communities, Native American Tribal Councils, and business groups/chambers of commerce. We also mobilize members and potential members through our online network, which consists of our Web and social media presence, online action alerts, and eNews.

Ojito Wilderness—2005. The designation of Ojito Wilderness in 2005 was one of the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance's first conservation victories.

Sabinoso Wildernerness—2009. Sabinoso became Wilderness on March 24, 2009, when President Obama signed into law the Omnibus Public Lands Management Act of 2009.

Rio Grande del Norte National Monument—2013. President Obama designated the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument in March 2013. NM Wild has worked on this campaign since 2007 and continues to seek wilderness within the national monument.

Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument—2014. President Obama designated close to 500,000 acres for this monument in May 2014. The Wilderness Alliance worked on this campaign for over a decade to build community support.

Columbine Hondo Wilderness—2014. In December 2014 this 45,000 acre Wilderness Study Area in the Carson National Forest was protected permanently as Wilderness.

2019: Thirteen New Wilderness Areas
A federal public lands package that was signed into law on March 12, 2019 established 13 new Wilderness areas in New Mexico, adding 272,586 acres of new Wilderness to the state’s total. Ten of the new Wilderness areas were within the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument and two were within the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument. Also included was the new Ah-Shi-Sle-Pah Wilderness and an expansion of the existing Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness. New Mexico Wild worked for years to identify many of these sites as eligible for Wilderness designation long before the eventual establishment of the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks and Rio Grande del Norte National Monuments.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We recently launched an on-line hiking guide and received lots of input from members of the community who used the guide. Feedback was collected and several changes were made in the search functionality of the guide to help people find trails within a specific Wilderness Area.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

NEW MEXICO WILDERNESS ALLIANCE
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

NEW MEXICO WILDERNESS ALLIANCE

Board of directors
as of 2/3/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Wendy Brown

No Affiliation


Board co-chair

Todd Schulke

Center for Biological Diversity

David Soules

No Affiliation

Joe Alcock

Carol Johnson

Sam DesGeorges

Wendy Brown

Ernie Atencio

Ken Cole

Ken Jones

Keegan King

NM Department of Indian Affairs

Brian O'Donnell

Sally Paez

Todd Schulke

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/03/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/03/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.