Youth Development

The Robert F. Nicodemus Memorial Wilderness Project

Inspiring Humanity to Protect our Planet

aka Nicodemus Wilderness Project   |   Albuquerque, NM   |  www.wildernessproject.org

Mission

Our mission: To protect wildlife and our environment and to build future conservation leaders by engaging youth in environmental stewardship projects worldwide.

Notes from the nonprofit

The Nicodemus Wilderness Project (NWP) maintains the highest standards in transparency among nonprofit organizations, meaning that any of our organizational, operational, or financial documents are freely available to the public. Copies of our annual reports to the N.M. Office of the Attorney General, N.M. Secretary of State, and U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS), along with our Articles of Incorporation, Bylaws, Conflict of Interest Policy, IRS Determination Letter, Strategic Plan, and Succession Plan are always available by contacting us. GuideStar, the national database of nonprofit organizations, publishes our annual certified nonprofit report and has awarded NWP a Platinum Seal of Transparency.

Ruling year info

2000

President

Robert K. Dudley Ph.D.

Main address

115 Cornell Dr. SE #40712

Albuquerque, NM 87196 USA

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EIN

85-0472006

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Environmental Education and Outdoor Survival Programs (C60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Nicodemus Wilderness Project (NWP) was founded to address the need for environmental restoration, stewardship, and protection of neglected public lands and waters. Our large, worldwide network of enthusiastic volunteers draw upon the diverse strengths of different races and cultures to accomplish our common goal of restoring beauty to the natural landscape. NWP's youth volunteer programs use local community resources to provide long-term environmental benefits for natural areas around the globe. By working with communities, NWP educates youth on the need to protect the environment by promoting stewardship of the wild lands and waters that support Earth's biodiversity and ecosystems.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Apprentice Ecologist Initiative

The goals of the Apprentice Ecologist Initiative are to: 1. Elevate youth into leadership roles by engaging them in environmental cleanup and conservation projects, 2. Empower young people to help rebuild the environmental and social wellbeing of their communities, 3. Improve local living conditions for both citizens and wildlife through environmental education, activism, and action. For full details about this program, please visit: http://www.wildernessproject.org/volunteer_apprentice_ecologist

Population(s) Served
Adolescents (13-19 years)
Budget
$5,000

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents (13-19 years),At-risk youth,Students

Related Program

Apprentice Ecologist Initiative

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric tracks the total number of NWP volunteers per year.

Number of unique website visitors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents (13-19 years),At-risk youth,Students

Related Program

Apprentice Ecologist Initiative

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric tracks the total number of unique visitors to the NWP website per year.

Number of individuals completing apprenticeship

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents (13-19 years),At-risk youth,Students

Related Program

Apprentice Ecologist Initiative

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric tracks the total number of NWP Apprentice Ecologists per year.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

1. Elevate youth into leadership roles by engaging them in environmental cleanup and conservation projects,<br/>2. Empower young people to help rebuild the environmental and social wellbeing of their communities,<br/>3. Improve local living conditions for both citizens and wildlife through environmental education, activism, and action.

Strategy 1. We have found that disadvantaged/at-risk teenagers are highly unlikely to become Apprentice Ecologists without targeted outreach efforts, organized projects, and structured activities. We will continue conducting collaborative large-scale projects on local volunteering days (e.g., Spring Cleanup in the Foothills, Make a Difference Day etc.), but will expand our outreach efforts to provide more opportunities for disadvantaged/at-risk teenagers to become Apprentice Ecologists as part of these projects. Additionally, if funding becomes available to support part-time or full-time staff positions (NWP Director and/or Program Manager), we plan to engage disadvantaged/at-risk teenagers in NWP special projects during weekdays so that they comprise the majority of the participants and can receive more individual mentoring/encouragement as part of their experience.<br/><br/>Strategy 2. Adding the Apprentice Ecologist Initiative™ scholarship in 2007 has dramatically increased the visibility of our program and has also resulted in increased participation of youth from around the world. This component to our program heavily relies on the internet, automated processing software, and online database management programs. Expansion of this component to our program could be done primarily through internet recruiting, marketing, and promotion of the Apprentice Ecologist Initiative™.<br/><br/>Strategy 3. The growth of the Apprentice Ecologist Initiative™ locally, nationally, and internationally relies heavily on its visibility. Our primary mechanisms for increasing our visibility have been through in-kind internet advertising, promotion of our scholarship via online resources, and media publication about our program or projects in online and printed articles. The number and value of online donations has increased as a result of our more prominent position on the internet, but this still accounts for only a small fraction of our overall funding. Building a strong local support network and winning grants for local projects will likely be dependent, in part, on our ability to increase our visibility within the greater Albuquerque, NM area.<br/><br/>Strategy 4. The growth of the Apprentice Ecologist Initiative™ has already resulted in numerous efforts to improve programmatic efficiency and reduce costs. In addition to these changes, it is also recognized that financial resources must be directed toward building the infrastructure of the program. Additional funding resources (via fundraising and grant-making) need to be acquired to support part-time or full-time staff positions (NWP Director and/or Program Manager). It will also be critical to maintain existing volunteers and recruit new volunteers so that we can sustain a strong volunteer workforce to further strengthen our program infrastructure.

Post youth-targeted announcements of our local volunteering days at project sites (trailheads and parking lots), online (volunteer matching databases and scholarship databases), and via email (NWP email list and City of Albuquerque MOVE). Communicate with individual youth volunteers, youth volunteer groups, and organizations serving youth (e.g., Bernalillo County Juvenile Detention Center, Albuquerque Public Schools, local nonprofits) about upcoming projects and their level of commitment. Communication with individual youth volunteers and volunteer youth groups about project and scholarship related questions. Pursue inclusion of NWP related stories in printed articles by contacting newspapers and magazines and by providing project information, photos, and quotes to grantors and cooperating governmental agencies. Provide information on Apprentice Ecologist scholarships to high school counselors, librarians, and online scholarship database managers. Provide NWP project fliers and brochures at environmentally-related events. Seek grants from corporations, foundations, and government agencies to support local Apprentice Ecologist program and overall scholarship fund. Foster dialogue with internal and external stakeholders of NWP by enlisting their assistance in the development of strategic planning documents. Follow protocols adopted by the BBB Wise Giving Alliance to maintain strong standards of accountability.

- At least 50% of local project participants are youth volunteers (≤21 years old).<br/>- At least 33% of local youth project participants are disadvantaged/at-risk teenagers.<br/>- At least 150 volunteers (ca. 75 youth volunteers, including 25 disadvantaged/at-risk teenagers) participate in local NWP/OSD volunteering days as part of the Apprentice Ecologist Initiative™ each year.<br/>- At least 200 youth volunteers become leaders of independent Apprentice Ecologist projects nationally and internationally each year.<br/>- At least 4,000 youth volunteers (ca. 20 per project) participate in these projects each year.<br/>- Increased inclusion of NWP related stories in national/international publications.<br/>- Increased scholarship listings in online scholarship databases.<br/>- Increase number and total amount of grant funding from corporations, foundations, and government agencies.<br/>- Increase in the number of total members<br/>- Increase in the number and total amount of donations from existing members<br/>- Participation of stakeholders in strategic planning<br/>- Meet all requirements of the BBB Wise Giving Alliance

- At least 50% of local project participants are youth volunteers (≤21 years old).<br/>- At least 33% of local youth project participants are disadvantaged/at-risk teenagers.<br/>- At least 150 volunteers (ca. 75 youth volunteers, including 25 disadvantaged/at-risk teenagers) participate in local NWP/OSD volunteering days as part of the Apprentice Ecologist Initiative™ each year.<br/>- At least 200 youth volunteers become leaders of independent Apprentice Ecologist projects nationally and internationally each year.<br/>- At least 4,000 youth volunteers (ca. 20 per project) participate in these projects each year.<br/>- Increased inclusion of NWP related stories in national/international publications.<br/>- Increased scholarship listings in online scholarship databases.<br/>- Increase number and total amount of grant funding from corporations, foundations, and government agencies.<br/>- Increase in the number of total members<br/>- Increase in the number and total amount of donations from existing members<br/>- Participation of stakeholders in strategic planning<br/>- Meet all requirements of the BBB Wise Giving Alliance

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is the organization collecting feedback?

    We regularly collect feedback through: suggestion box/email, online reviews.

  • How is the organization using feedback?

    We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    We share feedback with: the people we serve, our staff, our board, our funders, our community partners.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to: we don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback.

Financials

The Robert F. Nicodemus Memorial Wilderness Project

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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The Robert F. Nicodemus Memorial Wilderness Project

Board of directors
as of 11/11/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Robert K. Dudley

Nicodemus Wilderness Project

Term: 1999 -

Robert Dudley

Nicodemus Wilderness Project

Yih-Ming Hsu

Nicodemus Wilderness Project

James Sattler

Nicodemus Wilderness Project

Jodi Hedderig

Nicodemus Wilderness Project

Mary Dudley

Nicodemus Wilderness Project

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Keywords

youth, education, environment, conservation