PLATINUM2024

The Freedom Train Project Incorporated

Lake Elsinnore, CA   |  https://thefreedomtrainproject.org

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Mission

The Freedom Train Project actively empowers survivors of coercion within the United States. We guide them from escape to healing and recovery. We offer a holistic range of services. These include peer support groups, legal assistance, collaboration with law enforcement, and therapy with qualified professionals. We also focus on cult education, providing essential supplies, and facilitating access to housing and employment opportunities. Integral to our approach is the promotion of public awareness and support initiatives. We finely tune our services to meet the evolving needs of survivors across various recovery phases.

Ruling year info

2021

Executive Director

Tabitha Marie Chapman

Main address

52997 Carrousel Ct

Lake Elsinnore, CA 92595 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

85-3635000

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (F01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Victims of Coercive Control and Cults are overlooked when it comes to receiving services or getting help, leaving their high demand/high control groups, often referred to as 'cults.' These victims often stay in their groups longer than necessary as the nature of these groups reduces people's access to peer support and financial stability. They lower victims' self-esteem, leaving them dependent on the group leaders. With organizations traditionally focused on domestic violence or trafficking, victims of these groups are often turned away without support and must find a way on their own. We seek to end that and assist wherever possible as people leave their coercive environments. We also aim to educate the public and victim service agencies on this emerging victim population and how best to provide them with services.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Depot Program

Victim Advocacy Resourcing for Victims of Coercive Control and/or cult survivors.

Population(s) Served

International Cult Awareness Month (ICAM) is when communities come together to highlight the dangers and realities of cultic practices. We hope to provide support for those affected. Every August, ICAM aims to educate the public about cults and their harmful impacts.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims of crime and abuse
Adults
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims of crime and abuse
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Karen Cooper Beloved Community Award 2023

California Partnership to End Domestic Violence

Affiliations & memberships

Karen Cooper Beloved Community Award 2023

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Depot Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Depot Program

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients who report that services/supports are available when needed, even in a crisis

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Depot Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients for whom the transition plan is fully implemented (including receipt of all services as planned)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Depot Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of media partnerships developed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Activists, Academics, Emergency responders, Self-employed people

Related Program

International Cult Awarness Month

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of invitations for advocates to speak as experts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

International Cult Awarness Month

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of research or policy analysis products developed, e.g., reports, briefs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Victims and oppressed people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of community events or trainings held and attendance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Increase the number of survivors of coercive control by providing assistance for them to leave.
Reduce the number of services offered to each client over time to demonstrate harm reduction.
Increase education for the public to reduce stigmatization and increase the assistance and support available.

We provide direct care services to people leaving or who have left high-demand coercive groups, also referred to as cults, or to those leaving abusive relationships involving coercive control. We turn no one down as long as they live in the United States. Our clients receive services at no cost, and our advocates are all volunteers or donate their time in-kind for the mission.
We monitor the services provided to clients over time and ensure progress is occurring, discontinuing services as needed.
We have an annual awareness month called International Cult Awareness Month, which we use to deliver Cult 101 information to the public.
We create and share social media campaigns to help educate the public as well as victim service providers on how to help and treat cult victims.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

The Freedom Train Project Incorporated
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Freedom Train Project Incorporated

Board of directors
as of 04/16/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Amber Gray

Ashley McLean

Andrew Morrison

Lynn Beisner

Amber D. Gray

Summer Cooke

Rebecca A Ax

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/15/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/02/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.