PLATINUM2023

United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona

Stronger United

aka United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona   |   Tucson, AZ   |  www.unitedwaytucson.org

Mission

Building a thriving community by uniting people, ideas and resources.

Notes from the nonprofit

Our community depends on the active engagement of our business partners to support programs and initiatives that eliminate poverty in our region. I encourage you to sponsor one or more of these opportunities to make lasting, positive change in Southern Arizona. A vibrant, healthy community benefits us all. ~Tony Penn, President & CEO

Ruling year info

1958

President & CEO

Mr. Tony Penn

Main address

330 N Commerce Park Loop Ste 200

Tucson, AZ 85745 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

86-0098932

NTEE code info

Fund Raising Organizations That Cross Categories includes Community Funds/Trusts and Federated Giving Programs) e.g. United Way (T70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2019.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

At United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona, we transform individual lives and bring long-lasting, systemic change to our community by focusing on the key, underlying issues. We fight for quality education, financial stability and healthy communities for every person in Tucson and Southern Arizona. Our role as community convener enables us to form strategic partnerships, mobilize the best resources and be the catalyst for needed, positive change.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Cradle to Career: Pima County's Partnership for Graduation and Beyond

Outcome-based initiative supported by a Leadership Council, the Partnership focuses on Kindergarten Readiness, High School Graduation and Re-Engagement of Youth not in school or work.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Read On Tucson is part of a national effort to improve grade level reading by 3rd grade. Read On Tucson has partnered with 20 high need elementary schools, serving more than 9,000 children to implement proven strategies that will increase 3rd grade reading scores. Our target is that 85% of children in these schools will be reading proficiently in 3rd grade by 2020 where currently less than 60% are reading at grade level.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) Program offers free tax preparation to low- and moderate-income families and individuals throughout Tucson and Arizona. VITA ensures that families and individuals receive all tax benefits for which they are eligible, most importantly the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), which has been recognized as the single most powerful tool to lift children out of poverty.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Family Support Alliance was formed through the family support committee work of United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona’s First Focus on Kids Impact Council. The committee recognizes the critical need to support parents in their key role to develop every aspect of a child’s growth and learning.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Mission: To fundamentally change the way we talk about death.

Vision: To be the community voice in the way we live and end well.

A collaborative of 10 organizations striving to create a model and hub for End of Life Care in Arizona. UWTSA serves as the backbone agency, convening the organizations and aiding in building a collaborative model.

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses
Seniors

Great Expectations for Teachers, Children, Families and Communities works to build and strengthen the comprehensive professional development continuum in Pima and Cochise County. Efforts are enhanced and augmented by 16 Communities of Practice (COP) that work together to create an ideal regional professional development system. The resulting system is creating early education pathways for those with limited credentials in early childhood education as well as for those with extensive early childhood education expertise and degrees. The ultimate result is a better prepared workforce capable of ensuring children high quality experiences leading to success in their education and beyond.

Population(s) Served
Academics

The ELDER Alliance is a change network that supports a strong system of services for the increasing numbers of older adults in Pima County, to enable them to stay healthy, active and have quality of life through the aging process.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

Get involved, make a difference.

http://volunteer.unitedwaytucson.org/

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of donations made by board members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

100% of our board members give at least $1,000 or more.

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

More than 6,000 individuals, retirees, employees from nearly 300 companies who run workplace campaigns.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Board, committee & coalition members, Days of Caring & VITA

Number of coalition members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

ELDER Alliance, End of Life Care, Cradle to Career, Youth on the Rise, Great Expectations, Financial Stability Partnership, Family Support Alliance, First Focus on Kids, Read on Tucson

The number of community members that received free tax services through UWTSA

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

More than $20 million in federal refunds were returned to low-income Arizona residents through our VITA program including $6.4 million in Earned Income Tax Credit.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Today, United Way's focus is to make a difference in the lives of children, families and seniors. We strive to make sure children are ready to learn, families are safe and self-sufficient and seniors remain independent and active.

Thanks to your help, we are achieving visible, lasting changes for Southern Arizonans.

We accomplish our results by bringing people together — subject experts, business leaders,donors, neighborhoods, and members of local nonprofit agencies — to help identify our community's most critical social issues. In forming these partnerships, we are better able to address the underlying causes of problems in our community and prevent them from happening.

United Way is focused on achieving real results through the implementation of strategies that work. To achieve the results donors want and expect, we need more resources directed to our work and our three focus areas so that we can make an even greater positive impact on the lives of children, families and seniors.

Our Vision: An economically strong, safe and healthy community where Southern Arizona residents can live and work.

Strategic Goal

To achieve measurable results in three areas:

Education: Helping People Achieve Their Potential
Income: Promoting Financial Stability and Independence
Health: Improving People's Health and Well-being

While we guarantee accountability by setting goals and measuring results, we invest in the areas that will make the biggest impact in our community — youth graduating from high school, older adults staying as independent as possible, and providing support for emergencies and basic needs. By focusing on positive, lasting change in education, income and health, we improve the lives of those most in need in Southern Arizona.

Community impact dollars are allocated through a comprehensive assessment process. United Way does not allocate the funds. Community volunteers from Southern Arizona help to decide which programs receive funding. These volunteers are active in our community and have a vested interest in making sure the funds are invested where they will do the most good for the most people. Any program receiving United Way funding is held accountable to quantifiable results and measurements, as well as a list of standards for each program. This is why when you invest through United Way, you know your dollar is being leveraged to achieve the greatest impact.

What our United Ways does well is to recruit people with passion, expertise and resources to make a difference. But that's not enough. We also aspire to drive collaborative community change. That means we – and our partners – must facilitate a shared community vision and coordinated action across a diverse coalition, along with mutual accountability, sustained effort and measured results. It means working collaboratively on community-wide and community-based strategies that can drive real change and bringing people from all walks of life together to work in meaningful ways – not just giving, but also advocating and volunteering – to advance these community strategies.

UWTSA positively impacts more than 233,000 people in Tucson and Southern Arizona each year by convening service providers, community members and funders, to create a long lasting collective impact.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona

Board of directors
as of 08/29/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Calline Sanchez

IBM

Term: 2021 - 2023

Lee D. Lambert

Pima Community College

Calline Sanchez

IBM

Steven Dasch

Citi

Mary Rowley

APR, Strongpoint Marketing

Allison Duffy

Silverado Technologies/Sasiadek's Print Solutions

Edmund Marquez

Edmund Marquez Allstate Agencies

Tony Penn

President & CEO, United Way of Tucson and Southern Arizona

Chad Whelan

CEO Banner-University Medicine Tucson

Alicia White

CPA Keegan Linscott & Associates

Paul Tees

Tucson Market President, Chief Credit Officer Commerce Bank of Arizona

Trish Muir

Pima Area Labor Federation Chair

Ernest Jones

Senior Director, Employee Engagement and Programs Comcast

Lori Garmus

Executive Director of Human Resources Raytheon Technologies

Deepa Dalvi

Project Leader Companion Diagnostics at Roche

Marc Cameron

Vice President of Resource industries Sales, Services and Technology Caterpillar, Inc.

John Caldwell

Vice President and General Manager Linear Amplifiers at Texas Instruments

Jessica Brack

Manager, Social Responsibility – Community Development – Sierrita Operations Freeport-McMoRan

Jeff Artzi

Founder & CEO OOROO Auto

Kevin Cutter

Executive Vice President, Regional President Pacific Premier Bank

Michelle Trindade

Regional Vice President GEICO

Matthew Thrower

Project Executive DPR Construction

Steven Manakee

CPA, CGMA MBN Consulting Services PLLC

Neal Eckel

Farhang & Medcoff

Robert C. Robbins

President, The University of Arizona

Howard Stewart

AGM Container Controls

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/29/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/29/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.