Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum

aka Desert Museum   |   TUCSON, AZ   |  www.desertmuseum.org

Mission

The mission of the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum is to inspire people to live in harmony with the natural world by fostering love, appreciation, and understanding of the Sonoran Desert.

The Museum is regularly listed as one of the top ten zoological parks in the world due to its unique approach in interpreting the complete natural history of a single region (in our case this is the Sonoran Desert and adjacent ecosystems).

Not a “museum" in the usual sense, it is an unparalleled composite of plant, animal, and geologic collections with the goal of making the Sonoran Desert accessible, understandable, and valued.

Ruling year info

1954

Executive Director

Mr. Craig S. Ivanyi

Main address

2021 N KINNEY RD

TUCSON, AZ 85743 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

86-0111675

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Mission of the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum is to inspire people to live in harmony with the natural world by fostering love, appreciation, and understanding of the Sonoran Desert. The organization works to educate on the problems facing it, and highlight the unique characteristics of this diverse region.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Pollinator Conservation

For over two decades, biologists have been concerned about declines in pollinator populations worldwide. Current ASDM pollinator conservation efforts focus on monarch butterflies and native bees in the Sonoran Desert. The monarch butterfly migration is one of the natural wonders of the world, yet has been listed as a threatened phenomenon by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. ASDM works with regional partners to better understand and conserve monarchs that pass through the Sonoran Desert. The Museum also manages a citizen science project (Pollinator Hotspots) to help understand the health of native bee populations regionally.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Springs, streams and rivers in the Sonoran Desert have all been declining in recent years due to a decade-long drought, and diversion of water for human needs. The Museum works with partners to hold, breed and supplement the populations of these species in the wild.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Rapid spread of buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare) and the conversion of fire-resistant desert to flammable grassland rivals climate change and drought as our region's most pressing environmental issue. Fires that kill native plants and damage wildlife habitat create even more space for buffelgrass, which not only survives the fire but thrives on fire. In the absence of fire, buffelgrass outcompetes native plants for space, sunlight, moisture, and nutrients, threatening the long-term persistence of individual plant and animal species, as well as entire natural communities within southern Arizona. Buffelgrass also poses a threat to our quality of life and regional economy. Ecotourism is a cornerstone of the economy of southern Arizona, and the saguaro is the symbol of our community. Without continued effort to control this grass, the saguaros we see today in the Tucson Mountains and the Catalina foothills will likely be the last saguaros to stand in these landscapes.

Population(s) Served
Adults

During the colonial period, Spanish settlers introduced new foods to Sonoran Desert gardens, including pomegranates, figs, pears, peaches and quinces. The Kino Heritage Fruit Trees project is working to restore these trees to historical orchards, and bring their diversity and quality to people in the region today.

Population(s) Served
Adults

There are over 800 species of bees in the Sonoran Desert. This research helps to identify and DNA barcode these important pollinators.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of paid admissions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Annual admissions shows attendance.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Desert Museum is aiming to accomplish its mission of inspiring people to live in harmony with the natural world by fostering love, appreciation, and understanding of the Sonoran Desert

The Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum strategies for accomplishing these goals and addressing the problems is through education, interactive experiences, conservation, and research initiatives.

The organization encompasses many sectors and departments that specialize in all aspects of Sonoran Desert education. It encompasses aspects of a zoo, botanical garden, earth sciences, natural history museum, and art institute that promotes conservation through art education. The capabilities to meet goals is supported by a strong team of specialized staff.

The Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum has grown exponentially since 1952 in scale and reputation. Hundreds of thousands of people are educated on the Sonoran Desert each and every year. We expect to continue and grow this into the future.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Visitors to the Desert Museum, residents of the Sonoran Desert, program participants.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Visitor feedback on trail safety has been used to identify potential dangers on-grounds. Maintenance staff fixed the problem.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Visitors love to see when their feedback is implemented and helps them to feel better connected to the Desert Museum.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum

Board of directors
as of 10/19/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Stephen Brigham

retired

Term: 2020 - 2023

Paul Baker

Retired

Michael Baldwin

Trustee, Priscilla and Michael Baldwin Foundation

Craig Barker

Senior Vice President of Financial Services, University of Arizona Foundation

Shane Burgess

Veterinarian / Scientist

John Doerr

Dentist (retired)

Lynn Ericksen

General Manager (retired), Hilton Tucson el Conquistador

J. Garcia

Executive Vice President, Visit Tucson

Russell Jones

President/CEO, R. L. Jones Management Group

Jose Lever

Coordinator, University of Arizona Mexico Office

William Lomicka

Chairman, Coulter Ridge Capital

Lisa Lovallo

Southern Arizona Market Vice President, Cox Communications

Shannan Marty

Founder, High Roads Venture LLC and S&G Leasing LLC

Nannon Roosa

Chief Operating Officer, Intuor Technologies, LLC

Alyce Sadongei

Project Manager, American Indian Language Development Institute, University of Arizona

Peter Salter

CEO (retired), Salter Labs

John Schaefer

Former President, University of Arizona

Joan Scott

Arizona Game and Fish Department (retired)

Peter Wand

Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie's Tax Practice Group

Chandler Warden

President, Bert W. Martin Foundation

Steven Brigham

Architect (retired)

Lisa Harris

Founder, Harris Environmental Group, Inc.

Bobby Present

Senior Vice President, RBC Wealth Management

Alexander Schauss

Research Associate, Bio5 Institute and Department of Geoscience, University of Arizona

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/17/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability