Junior League of Phoenix Inc

Phoenix, AZ   |  www.jlp.org

Mission

The Junior League of Phoenix is an organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women, and improving the community through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers.

Ruling year info

1953

President

Jennie Elser

Main address

2505 N. Central Ave.

Phoenix, AZ 85004 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

86-0178631

NTEE code info

Women's Service Clubs (S81)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Maricopa County is the 6th largest county in the U.S. with 4.3 million citizens. In our midst we have hundreds of thousands of people who would be considered vulnerable and underserved due to many significant life challenges caused by illness, disability, addiction, severe poverty, lack of education and full employment. Since 1935, Junior League Phoenix (JLP) has been working to make life better for many of our community neighbors. JLP has a strong commitment to training its members with invaluable learning opportunities ranging from leadership and organizational development training to community program instruction and nonprofit fundraising skills. Through this unique curriculum, members learn how to not only manage and train volunteers, but also how to collaborate with community agencies to maximize a volunteer’s impact and thus aid a greater number of disadvantaged and underserved in our community.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Reducing Hunger & Improving Access to Basic Needs

Junior League of Phoenix is working towards reducing hunger in the greater Phoenix area. We do this through addressing critically important issues of hunger and food insecurity in multiple community programs across Maricopa County.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

Reducing Hunger & Improving Access to Basic Needs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Even in the midst of the COVID-19 Pandemic, JLP was able to put in nearly 1,000 volunteer hours within the community. This metric does not include the many hours league members volunteer for the org.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

In addition to our quality volunteer training, we are focused on helping reduce food insecurity.
The alleviation of local hunger continues to be one of the greater Phoenix community's most significant social challenges. This heartbreaking trend of adults and children suffering from hunger and food insecurity on a regular basis has continued and worsened since the great recession. With the unknown but substantial effects of the 2020 Coronavirus and the already stepped up requests from food banks, Arizona is on the verge of an even more pervasive problem with hunger and food insecurities.

We recently determined that the JLP will work hard to help alleviate the most pressing basic needs through community programs at Harvest Compassion Center and with St. Vincent de Paul. Both community partners engage with thousands of those in need each week so we know that our work will have a far-reaching impact.

Not only will our ongoing training help produce highly qualified and knowledgeable JLP volunteers who help nonprofit organizations within our community programs, but they also assist by serving as key volunteers with many different social service and human service-oriented organizations. In these volunteer roles we do everything from govern the nonprofit as board members, to participate in much needed service delivery positions such as providing food boxes to children and helping families learn to plant their own food and embrace healthy diets.

The Junior League of Phoenix is comprised of more than 1,000 women who contribute more than 100,000 hours annually of volunteer service to the Greater Phoenix community. As previously mentioned, our volunteers have an advantage of having access to highly credentialed individuals who train members on the best practices of volunteerism, communication, fundraising, service delivery, etc.

We are responsible for creating or have been a founding partner for the following organizations and events: Crisis Nursery; Ronald McDonald House, Ryan House; Komen Race for the Cure; The Arizona Science Museum; Rosson House; Phoenix Museum of History; Orpheum Theater; Children’s Museum of Phoenix and many others.

We aim to continue developing the potential of women, promote voluntarism and strengthen the community by assessing local needs and developing programs around those critical needs that will be supported by our trained volunteers.
Every year JLP provides both funding as well as expert volunteers to assist with several nonprofit programs. The programs below illustrate what the organization plans to do next in 2020/2021:
1) Harvest Compassion Center (HCC): More than a local food bank, it is a one-stop shopping experience where anyone living in Arizona can choose their most needed food, hygiene, baby and clothing items free of charge. Currently located in Phoenix, Maryvale and Chandler, the HCC is schedule to open its fourth center to help increase accessibility to healthy food options, clean clothing, and additional life essentials.
2) St. Vincent de Paul: The program that JLP will help fund and staff with volunteers is The Ivy Center for Family Wellness will provide wellness educational opportunities for the whole family, including:
a. taking families into the urban farm to teach them how to plant their own healthy food—including the children in the planting and harvesting process
b. inviting families to the Ivy Center test kitchen where culturally competent registered dietitians will show families how to prepare and buy high quality, low cost healthy foods
c. Preparing and handing out fresh food boxes to families that attend the SVdP evening meal
3) We will continue working on signature programs from the past few years: Kids in the Kitchen, ROCKETS, and Phoenix Food Day & Healthfest. For more information on these programs: www.jlp.org

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our board, Our membership,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Junior League of Phoenix Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Junior League of Phoenix Inc

Board of directors
as of 2/10/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jennie Elser

Group Twenty Seven

Term: 2020 - 2022

Christina Coyne

Coyne Ventures LLC

Lisa Donahue

Elizabeth Goldstein

CVS Health

Tameka Fox Hartman

Town of Gilbert

Kellie Martin

The Accounting Company

Blair Coe Schweiger

Genesis Program, Inc.

Shannon Larson

The HEFAR Group

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/10/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data