Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southern Arizona, Inc.

Live BIG

aka BBBS of Southern Arizona   |   Tucson, AZ   |  www.soazbigs.org

Mission

The mission of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southern Arizona is to create and support one-to-one mentoring relationships that ignite the power and promise of youth. Our vision is that all youth achieve their full potential. We help children realize their potential and build their futures. By partnering with parents/guardians, volunteers, and others in the community we are accountable for each child in our program achieving: • Higher aspirations, greater confidence, and better relationships • Avoidance of risky behaviors • Educational success

Ruling year info

1965

CEO

Ms. Marie Logan

Main address

160 E. Alameda St.

Tucson, AZ 85701 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Tucson

EIN

86-0188050

NTEE code info

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Secondary/High School (B25)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The need for our core services continues to increase and we regularly maintain a wait list of 150 children and youth ­­70% of whom are boys waiting for a male role model and mentor. While traditional Youth Mentoring Program is well established, we are incorporating new methods of mentoring to best support youth's contemporary needs. To be responsive to youth needs, we must continue to support our Youth Mentoring Program while finding additional funds to support new programs like Mentor 2.0 that specifically focuses on high school youth, preparing them for careers and college. We are addressing this challenge by having added an individual to our staff with specific responsibilities atdiversifying our revenue streams and increasing the volume of solicitations we pursue from individuals, companies and foundations. We do not receive any government funding or support from our national office. We keep our administrative costs low to maximize the amount of funds that support program costs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southern Arizona

The main operating program of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southern Arizona, Inc., is to ignite the potential a child's life by matching them with a supportive and caring adult volunteer. Program focus include academic, social, recreational, personal and social development.

We partner with parents/guardians, volunteers and others in the community and hold ourselves accountable for each child in our program achieving:

• Higher aspirations
• Greater confidence
• Better relationships
• Avoidance of risky behaviors
• Educational success

Population(s) Served

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southern Arizona creates and supports one to one mentoring relationships between adult role models and youth facing adversity throughout southern Arizona.

Children/youth between the ages of 6 and 16 are identified or referred to the organization by schools, the probation department, welfare agencies, guidance counselors, clinics, churches and parents. Children stay in the program until they turn 21 or graduate from college.

Volunteer applicants are carefully and comprehensively screened. This screening process includes an in-person interview, professional and personal reference checks, a driver’s license check, sexual offender background check, criminal background check and staff evaluation.

A match is made between an adult (individual or couple) and a child based on mutual interest, a volunteer’s strengths, a child’s need, personality and compatibility.

The relationship is monitored by professional staff members through phone calls and in-person contacts.
To help support matches, as well as introduce matches to each other, monthly outings throughout Tucson are provided for all active matches.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth who have a positive adult role model

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Mentoring

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The # of youth benefiting in one-to-one mentoring relationships. Each year over 150 children and youth to be matched to a Big Brother or Big Sister.

Number of children who have an innate motivation to master and control their environment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Mentoring

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The numbers represent the youth (Littles) matched with an adult mentor and reporting positive outcomes associated with the mentoring relationship.

Hours of mentoring

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Mentoring

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The hours of mentoring are dependent upon the number of matches made and sustained for any given year. The initial commitment is for one year and there is an ongoing effort to recruit volunteer Bigs

% of youth ages 6-18 improving or maintaining outcome areas from mentoring in social acceptance, grades, educational expectations, parental trust, etc., after 1 year with a Big Brother or Big Sister.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Mentoring

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These percentages represent the collective results of youth improving or maintaining in 7 to 8 specific outcome areas.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The mission of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Tucson, Inc. is to provide children facing adversity with strong and enduring, professionally supported one-to-one relationships that change their lives for the better, forever.

The purpose of the program is to match and support one-on-one mentoring relationships between responsible adults and children. Meeting consistently, the volunteer becomes a positive influence on the child, contributing to his/her development.

Volunteer applicants are carefully and comprehensively screened. This screening process includes an in-person interview, professional and personal reference checks, a driver's license check, sexual offender background check, criminal background check and staff evaluation.

A match is made between an adult (individual or couple) and a child based on mutual interest, a volunteer's strengths, a child's need, personality and compatibility.

The relationship is monitored by professional staff members through phone calls and in-person contacts.

To help support matches, as well as introduce matches to each other, monthly outings throughout Tucson are provided for all active matches.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Tucson (BBBST) began in 1963 as a Big Brothers program. In June of 1973 the agency was incorporated as a 501(c)(3) non-profit Arizona corporation. In 1976, the agency affiliated with Big Brothers Big Sisters of America. Big Sisters of Tucson was founded in 1974 and merged with Big Brothers of Tucson to form BBBST in June, 1980.

Since that time, BBBST has followed the best practices in mentoring for youth development as developed, maintained and enhanced by Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, of which BBBST is separate 501(c)(3) affiliate. The collective experiences of other BBBS affiliates is shared through meetings, conferences, Internet-based channels for Q & A requests for assistance, examples of what works best and simply sharing of capabilities and experiences.

We have accomplished and maintained approximately 550 matches between Bigs and Littles with relationships that require only a couple of hours two or three times a month, but often result in lon-term if not lifelong connections.

What we have not yet accomplished is recruiting enough qualified volunteers to serve as Bigs to the nearly 200 on a waiting list for such matches.

We are vigorously pursuing the resolution of that shortfall through increased efforts in volunteer recruitment, knowing well the fact that there are hundreds more youth in the greater Tucson area that could experience similar positive outcomes and improved outlooks for their future.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southern Arizona, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southern Arizona, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 9/24/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Adam Churchill

The Vanguard Group, Keller Williams of Southern Arizona

Term: 2017 - 2018

Kevin Bedient

Advantage Air Mechanical

Raymond Rios

Legal Shield

Michelle Carnes

Dorado Designs, Interior Designs

Adam Churchill

The Vanguard Group, Keller Williams Southern Arizona

Jeffrey Farmer

New York Life

Guy Larcom

Raytheon Missile Systems

Jed Lightcap

R & A CPAs

Cassandra Meynard

Waterfall, Economidid, Caldwell, Hanshaw & Villamana, P.C.

Justin Morgan

Comcast

Eric Nielsen

U.S. Commercial Service

Marie Logan

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Tucson

Sergio Acosta

Wells Fargo Bank

Matthew Nelson

Lovitt & Touche Insurance

Daniel Ortiz

Shipsey Insurance Group

Carol Yates

QuakeWrap, Inc.

Gabriela Cervantes

AGM Container Controls

Cassandra Meynard

Waterfall, Economidis, Caldwell, Hanshaw & Villamana, PC

Thomas Russo

Omni Homes International

Gina Anderson

Raytheon Missile Systems

Christopher Ercoli

Citibank

Daniela Gallagher

Sun Corridor, Inc.

Heidi Goldman

Steve Harvey

Long Realty

Heather Mosher

Pima County Attorney's Office

Daniel Ortiz

Lovitt & Touche

Kourtney Paire

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

Todd Sepp

Retirement Plan Professionals

Michael Toia

Northern Trust Securities, Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/16/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/16/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.