Emerge Center Against Domestic Abuse

Tucson, AZ   |  https://www.emergecenter.org

Mission

Emerge Center Against Domestic Abuse provides the opportunity to create, sustain and celebrate a life free from abuse. Emerge is the largest domestic violence service provider in Southern Arizona. We provide comprehensive domestic abuse services using a trauma-informed care model. Our services are available to anyone impacted by domestic abuse and include a 24-hour bilingual crisis hotline, emergency shelter, crisis intervention, lay-legal assistance, safety planning, case management, domestic abuse education, basic needs (food, clothing, hygiene items), support groups, life skills education, financial literacy, housing stabilization assistance, connections to community resources, transportation assistance, parenting education, age-appropriate services for children, and more.

Ruling year info

1976

CEO

Mr. Ed Mercurio-Sakwa

Executive Vice President

Anna Harper-Guerrero LMSW

Main address

2545 E Adams Street

Tucson, AZ 85716 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Tucson Center for Women and Children

Brewster Center

EIN

86-0312162

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

Hot Line, Crisis Intervention (F40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Domestic violence (DV) is a global threat to women’s health. Research shows that DV is the leading cause of injury to women—impacting this population more than car accidents, muggings and rapes combined. In our community, DV is an epidemic. According to the Arizona Coalition to End Sexual & Domestic Violence, there were 19 DV-related deaths in Pima County in 2018. Often, our community experiences 20–25 DV-related deaths annually. In addition to the trauma and deaths inflicted by DV, the financial costs are staggering. Last year, the Pima County Sheriff’s Department and Tucson Police Department responded to over 15,000 DV-related 911 calls. According to figures provided by the agencies, responding to those calls came at a cost of over $6,100,000. Thousands of women and children fleeing DV receive emergency services from Emerge each year. Emerge not only provides immediate safety and support services, but also helps survivors create healthier lives free from abuse.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

24-Hour Bilingual Hotline

Our bilingual hotline serves as the central access point to all of our services including emergency shelter.

Our team of hotline specialists is available 24-hours a day, every day of the year.

Population(s) Served
Adults

In many cases, leaving an abusive relationship also means leaving home. Beyond shelter, housing is the primary need of domestic violence victims. Establishing housing can be exceedingly difficult for victims of domestic abuse. Financial dependence is one of the top reasons women aren’t able to leave abusive relationships and national research indicates 98% of abusive relationships involve economic abuse. Even when victims of domestic abuse leave their partners, ruined credit scores, erratic employment histories, legal issues, or debt can threaten their future employment and financial security. Without access to services or resources, victims can face the impossible decision between becoming homeless or remaining with/returning to their abuser.

Emerge offers the only housing program specifically for victims of domestic abuse in the region. Our housing program helps participants obtain housing as soon as they are ready while we provide intensive case management and support to further them on the path to self-sufficiency. Our program uses the Housing First model, with modifications to meet the needs of domestic violence victims; we have incorporated our trauma-informed care model and protocols for safety and confidentiality. Participants in our housing program have access to our full continuum of services and determine which services will help them achieve their goals. Case managers help participants remove barriers, build a network of support, and can provide temporary direct assistance for rent, security deposits, utilities, food, transportation, childcare, or other essential needs.

Some participants only need one-time assistance while others receive support for several months. When participants achieve self-sufficiency and complete the program they are encouraged to continue accessing our services, as needed, through our community-based sites.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Emerge provides 24-hour access to safety for victims of domestic violence and their children.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Emerge provides age-appropriate services for children exposed to domestic abuse. Core services for children include safety planning, domestic abuse education, individual and family support sessions, and activity groups.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Our full continuum of services includes a 24-hour bilingual hotline, emergency shelter, safety planning, lethality assessment, case management, basic needs (food, clothing, hygiene items), domestic abuse education, support groups, lay-legal assistance, life-skills education, financial literacy, housing stabilization assistance, connections to community resources, transportation assistance, parenting education, age-appropriate services for children, men’s education, domestic violence orientation for probationers, primary prevention services, and more.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Accreditations

US Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) 2016

Awards

Best Nonprofits To Work Top 50. 2016

NonProfit Times

Best Nonprofits To Work Top 50. 2015

NonProfit Times

Best Nonprofits To Work Top 50. 2014

Non Profit Times

Best Nonprofits To Work Top 50. 2013

NonProfit Times

Best Nonprofits To Work Top 50. 2012

NonProfit Times

Best Nonprofits To Work Top 50. 2011

NonProfit Times

Affiliations & memberships

Better Business Bureau 2016

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of nights of safe housing provided to families of domestic violence

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Emergency Shelter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Decrease due to COVID-19 and necessary safety protocols.

Number of clients assisted with legal needs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Comprehensive Domestic Abuse Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of families reporting that their support plan includes or reflects things that are important to them

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These results reflect responses from survivors who voluntarily chose to submit a survey. In 2019, the total number of surveys returned was 600, in 2018, 231, and in 2017, 227 were returned.

Number of clients who self-report increased skills/knowledge after educational program/intervention

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These results reflect responses from survivors who chose to voluntarily submit a survey. In 2019, the total number surveyed was 600 , in 2018, 231, in 2017, 227 were surveyed.

Number of clients who report a greater sense of purpose and improved overall wellness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These results reflect responses from survivors who voluntarily chose to submit a survey. In 2019, the total number of surveys returned was 600 , in 2018, 231, and in 2017, 227 were returned.

Number of clients who self-report that their safety has improved.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These results reflect responses from survivors who voluntarily chose to submit a survey. In 2019, the total number of surveys returned was 600, in 2018, 231, and in 2017, 227 were returned,.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to end the cycle of domestic abuse in our community.

Emerge has over 40 years of experience providing support to people fleeing domestic abuse. Over the course of decades of service, we have created and/or updated programs with research-based practices. Emerge uses a voluntary services model, practices a trauma-informed care approach to service delivery, and ensures that all services are individualized and customized to each person we serve based on their unique needs and goals (as defined by them, not by us).

Our mission is to provide the opportunity to create, sustain and celebrate a life free from abuse. To that end, much of our programming addresses abuse that has already occurred. We provide DV survivors with 24/7 access to safety through our emergency shelter as well as a wide range of support services including safety planning, crisis intervention, case management, basic needs (food, clothing, personal hygiene items), support groups, domestic abuse education, lay-legal assistance, life-skills education, financial literacy, housing stabilization assistance, connections to community resources, transportation assistance, parenting education and age-appropriate services for children.

In addition to these services that meet the immediate and long-term needs of DV survivors, we also offer programming designed to stop abuse before it happens. Because we recognize that supporting DV survivors does not address the root of the problem and will never END domestic violence, Emerge offers services for people who are using abusive behaviors. Through a partnership with the Pima County Adult Probation Department, Emerge established the Men’s Education Program (MEP).

The MEP offers a 26-week course for men who are court-ordered probationers, as well as voluntary community members. Our goal is to help them unlearn beliefs and change behaviors that create risk for their partners, and ultimately help them learn how to make safe choices for themselves and their families. Using a psychoeducational and peer-facilitated approach, MEP focuses on changing individuals’ behaviors, while also addressing community influences on what individuals believe to be acceptable and “normal.” Our program uses a “community accountability model” and teaches men how to hold themselves and other men accountable for abusive behaviors and choices.

A seven-year longitudinal, multi-site study by the Centers for Disease Control showed that men completing at least three months of this kind of program were 50% less likely to re-assault their partners at the 15-month follow-up (compared with men who did not complete the program). At a four-year follow-up, fewer than 10% had re-assaulted their partners in the previous year. Even more telling, 85% of partners reported feeling “very safe” after their partner participated in this kind of program.

In 2008, Tucson Center for Women and Children (est. 1975) acquired the only other domestic violence service provider in Tucson, The Brewster Center Domestic Violence Services (est. 1963 and offering DV services since 1982), and began doing business under the name Emerge Center Against Domestic Abuse. Emerge became the sole provider of comprehensive, specialized domestic violence services in Tucson and the largest such provider in Southern Arizona. All services are offered in English and Spanish.

During the 43 years that we have been serving the Tucson/Pima County community, we have developed a full range of trauma-informed services to meet the needs of domestic violence victims/survivors and their children. Emerge is committed to growing and adapting our programs to better meet the needs of survivors in our community. For example, in 2012, Emerge began offering housing stabilization services to address the long-term self-sufficiency of DV survivors in Southern Arizona.

Since its inception, Emerge has provided intervention programs for victims of domestic abuse and their children, including: a crisis hotline, emergency shelter, community-based (non-residential) services, and a housing stabilization program with transitional and permanent housing options. The services provided through these programs are critical for the more than 5,800 people who access them each year. Emerge currently employs 80 – 100 staff and numerous direct and indirect service volunteers, Staff and direct service volunteers are required to complete an extensive training to understand the root causes of domestic abuse and how to provide trauma-informed care.

During the 40+ years we have served the Tucson/Pima County community, we have developed a full range of trauma-informed services to meet the needs of DV victims/survivors and their children. DV support services are a life-or-death need for thousands in our community. As the only dedicated DV service provider in Tucson, Emerge is committed to maintaining cost-effective programming.

In 2019-20, Emerge provided the following DV services through our programs in Tucson:
• 5,608 total survivors received support
• 6,602 hotline calls provided resources to people in crisis
•340 people, including 167 children, fleeing abuse accessed safety in shelter
• 2,029 survivors not in need of shelter received other DV support services
90-100% of program participants (across all programs) said the following about the impact of Emerge! programs on them:

• their safety has improved (91%)
• their knowledge about DV and its effects on their life has increased (94%)
• their knowledge of community resources and services has increased (92%)
• they are regaining control of their life (96%)
• the program has helped them to make informed choices about their situation (96%)
• they are more self-sufficient (95%)
• they are satisfied with the services they received (96%)

90-100% of program participants (across all programs) said the following about the impact of Emerge! programs on their children:
• their child(ren)’s understanding of how to stay safe improved (89%)
• their child(ren) have an increased sense of self-esteem (93%)
• their child(ren) feel that someone believes them and they are not alone (92%)

Financials

Emerge Center Against Domestic Abuse
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Emerge Center Against Domestic Abuse

Board of directors
as of 2/1/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Janet Linton

Jennings, Strous and Salmon PLC

Term: 2020 - 2021

Kendal White

University of Arizona

Tony Offret

Pima Community College

Lisa Capristo

Tucson Electric Power

Zach Breneman

The Loft Cinema

Marcos Guzman

University of Arizona

Elise Lopez

University of Arizona

Dr. Monica Moore

TMC One

Dr. Judith Riley

OB/GYN (Retired)

Lacey Perry

Bank of America

Rachel Tineo

Tucson Medical Center

Debbie Wong

Chase Bank (Retired)

Cameron Louie

Community Member

Olga Flores

Fairway Independent Mortgage Corp

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/01/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data