Human Services

Emerge Center Against Domestic Abuse

Tucson, AZ

Mission

Emerge Center Against Domestic Abuse provides the opportunity to create, sustain and celebrate a life free from abuse. Emerge is the largest domestic violence service provider in Southern Arizona. We provide comprehensive domestic abuse services using a trauma-informed care model. Our services are available to anyone impacted by domestic abuse and include a 24-hour bilingual crisis hotline, emergency shelter, crisis intervention, lay-legal assistance, safety planning, case management, domestic abuse education, basic needs (food, clothing, hygiene items), support groups, life skills education, financial literacy, housing stabilization assistance, connections to community resources, transportation assistance, parenting education, age-appropriate services for children, and more.

Ruling Year

1976

CEO

Mr. Ed Mercurio-Sakwa

Executive Vice President

Anna Harper-Guerrero LMSW

Main Address

2545 E Adams Street

Tucson, AZ 85716 USA

Formerly Known As

Tucson Center for Women and Children

Brewster Center

Keywords

Domestic Abuse, Domestic Violence, Emergency Shelter, Crisis Intervention, Safety Planning, Crisis Hotline, Lethality Assessment Protocol, Victim's Services, Housing, First, case managment

EIN

86-0312162

 Number

7285170967

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

Hot Line, Crisis Intervention (F40)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

Domestic violence (DV) is a global threat to women’s health. Research shows that DV is the leading cause of injury to women—impacting this population more than car accidents, muggings and rapes combined. In our community, DV is an epidemic. According to the Arizona Coalition to End Sexual & Domestic Violence, there were 19 DV-related deaths in Pima County in 2018. Often, our community experiences 20–25 DV-related deaths annually. In addition to the trauma and deaths inflicted by DV, the financial costs are staggering. Last year, the Pima County Sheriff’s Department and Tucson Police Department responded to 15,168 DV-related 911 calls. According to figures provided by the agencies, responding to those calls came at a cost of $5,373,893. Thousands of women and children fleeing DV receive emergency services from Emerge each year. Emerge not only provides immediate safety and support services, but also helps survivors create healthier lives free from abuse.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

24-Hour Bilingual Crisis Hotline

Housing Stabilization Assistance

Emergency Shelter

Services for Children Exposed to Domestic Abuse

Comprehensive Domestic Abuse Services

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of clients served

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of nights of safe housing provided to families of domestic violence

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Emergency Shelter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of clients assisted with legal needs

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Comprehensive Domestic Abuse Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of families reporting that their support plan includes or reflects things that are important to them

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

These results reflect responses from survivors who voluntarily chose to submit a survey. In 2018, the total number of surveys returned was 231, in 2017, 227 were returned, and 2016, 160 were returned.

Number of clients who self-report increased skills/knowledge after educational program/intervention

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

These results reflect responses from survivors who chose to voluntarily submit a survey. In 2018, the total number surveyed was 231, in 2017, 227 were surveyed, and in 2016, 222 were surveyed.

Number of clients who report a greater sense of purpose and improved overall wellness

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

These results reflect responses from survivors who voluntarily chose to submit a survey. In 2018, the total number of surveys returned was 231, in 2017, 227 were returned, and 2016, 222 were returned.

Number of clients who self-report that their safety has improved.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

These results reflect responses from survivors who voluntarily chose to submit a survey. In 2018, the total number of surveys returned was 231, in 2017, 227 were returned, and 2016, 222 were returned.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

Our goal is to end the cycle of domestic abuse in our community.

Emerge has over 40 years of experience providing support to people fleeing domestic abuse. Over the course of decades of service, we have created and/or updated programs with research-based practices. Emerge uses a voluntary services model, practices a trauma-informed care approach to service delivery, and ensures that all services are individualized and customized to each person we serve based on their unique needs and goals (as defined by them, not by us). Our mission is to provide the opportunity to create, sustain and celebrate a life free from abuse. To that end, much of our programming addresses abuse that has already occurred. We provide DV survivors with 24/7 access to safety through our emergency shelter as well as a wide range of support services including safety planning, crisis intervention, case management, basic needs (food, clothing, personal hygiene items), support groups, domestic abuse education, lay-legal assistance, life-skills education, financial literacy, housing stabilization assistance, connections to community resources, transportation assistance, parenting education and age-appropriate services for children. In addition to these services that meet the immediate and long-term needs of DV survivors, we also offer programming designed to stop abuse before it happens. Because we recognize that supporting DV survivors does not address the root of the problem and will never END domestic violence, Emerge offers services for people who are using abusive behaviors. Through a partnership with the Pima County Adult Probation Department, Emerge established the Men’s Education Program (MEP). The MEP offers a 26-week course for men who are court-ordered probationers, as well as voluntary community members. Our goal is to help them unlearn beliefs and change behaviors that create risk for their partners, and ultimately help them learn how to make safe choices for themselves and their families. Using a psychoeducational and peer-facilitated approach, MEP focuses on changing individuals’ behaviors, while also addressing community influences on what individuals believe to be acceptable and “normal.” Our program uses a “community accountability model” and teaches men how to hold themselves and other men accountable for abusive behaviors and choices. A seven-year longitudinal, multi-site study by the Centers for Disease Control showed that men completing at least three months of this kind of program were 50% less likely to re-assault their partners at the 15-month follow-up (compared with men who did not complete the program). At a four-year follow-up, fewer than 10% had re-assaulted their partners in the previous year. Even more telling, 85% of partners reported feeling “very safe” after their partner participated in this kind of program.

In 2008, Tucson Center for Women and Children (est. 1975) acquired the only other domestic violence service provider in Tucson, The Brewster Center Domestic Violence Services (est. 1963 and offering DV services since 1982), and began doing business under the name Emerge! Center Against Domestic Abuse. Emerge became the sole provider of comprehensive, specialized domestic violence services in Tucson and the largest such provider in Southern Arizona. All services are offered in English and Spanish. During the 43 years that we have been serving the Tucson/Pima County community, we have developed a full range of trauma-informed services to meet the needs of domestic violence victims/survivors and their children. Emerge is committed to growing and adapting our programs to better meet the needs of survivors in our community. For example, in 2012, Emerge began offering housing stabilization services to address the long-term self-sufficiency of DV survivors in Southern Arizona. Since its inception, Emerge has provided intervention programs for victims of domestic abuse and their children, including: a crisis hotline, emergency shelter, community-based (non-residential) services, and a housing stabilization program with transitional and permanent housing options. The services provided through these programs are critical for the more than 5,800 people who access them each year. Emerge currently employs 80 – 100 staff and numerous direct and indirect service volunteers, Staff and direct service volunteers are required to complete an extensive training to understand the root causes of domestic abuse and how to provide trauma-informed care.

We evaluate the impact/success of the program, in part, through feedback from participants who complete confidential surveys. Client surveys are distributed and evaluated on an on-going basis. Each month, 90–100% of participants who complete a survey consistently report that receiving services at Emerge has resulted in the following: • Increased safety • Increased knowledge of domestic violence and its effects on their life • Improved self-sufficiency • Improved ability to make informed choices about their situation • Increased knowledge of community resources and services • (Re)gaining control of their life • Increased sense of well-being • Achieving at least one goal in personal case plan

During the 40+ years we have served the Tucson/Pima County community, we have developed a full range of trauma-informed services to meet the needs of DV victims/survivors and their children. DV support services are a life-or-death need for thousands in our community. As the only dedicated DV service provider in Tucson, Emerge is committed to maintaining cost-effective programming. In 2018, Emerge provided the following DV services through our programs in Tucson: • 5,831 total survivors received support • 5,852 hotline calls provided resources to people in crisis • 797 people, including 372 children, fleeing abuse accessed safety in shelter • 2,252 survivors not in need of shelter received other DV support services 90-100% of program participants (across all programs) said the following about the impact of Emerge! programs on them: • their safety has improved (96%) • their knowledge about DV and its effects on their life has increased (97%) • their knowledge of community resources and services has increased (94%) • they are regaining control of their life (95%) • the program has helped them to make informed choices about their situation (96%) • they are more self-sufficient (99%) • they are satisfied with the services they received (97%) 90-100% of program participants (across all programs) said the following about the impact of Emerge! programs on their children: • their child(ren)’s understanding of how to stay safe improved (92%) • their child(ren) have an increased sense of self-esteem (93%) • their child(ren) feel that someone believes them and they are not alone (94%)

External Reviews

Accreditations

US Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) 2016

Awards

Best Nonprofits To Work Top 50. 2016

NonProfit Times

Best Nonprofits To Work Top 50. 2015

NonProfit Times

Best Nonprofits To Work Top 50. 2014

Non Profit Times

Best Nonprofits To Work Top 50. 2013

NonProfit Times

Best Nonprofits To Work Top 50. 2012

NonProfit Times

Best Nonprofits To Work Top 50. 2011

NonProfit Times

Affiliations & Memberships

Better Business Bureau 2016

Financials

Emerge Center Against Domestic Abuse

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2016 and 2015
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

See what's included

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Not Applicable