Child Crisis Arizona

Safe Kids. Strong Families.

Mesa, AZ   |  www.childcrisisaz.org

Mission

Child Crisis Arizona exists to provide children and youth in Arizona a safe environment, free from abuse and neglect, by creating strong and successful families.

Ruling year info

1976

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Torrie Taj CFRE

Main address

817 N. Country Club Drive

Mesa, AZ 85201 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Crisis Nursery, Inc.

Child Crisis Center

EIN

86-0324144

NTEE code info

Family Services (P40)

Child Day Care (P33)

Foster Care (P32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Child Crisis Arizona addresses two broad community problems. First, child abuse and neglect and, second, the need for early childhood education in low-income communities. For over 40 years, we have intervened when child abuse or neglect has occurred by providing head-to-toe, around-the-clock care for children removed from their birth families for severe maltreatment. Intervention programs include the Emergency Children's Shelter, Group Home, Foster Care and Adoption, and Counseling Programs. In an effort to prevent possible child abuse or neglect, we provide parent/caregiver education through the Family Education/Safe Kids Maricopa Program. To meet the need for early education, we run two early education centers offering Early Head Start and Preschool Programs, both located in low-income areas.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Intervention Services

Intervention services include the Emergency Children’s Shelter, Group Home, Foster Care and Adoption, and Counseling Programs. These programs serve children, ages birth through 17-years, the victims of the crimes of abuse and neglect, in the child welfare system. The Emergency Children’s Shelter is the only one of its kind in Arizona and serves children ages birth through 10-years. The Group Home provides care for boys ages 10 through 17-years. Foster Care and Adoption works to license (for foster care) or certify (for adoption) individuals and couples who wish to grow their families through the provision of these services. Once children are placed into their homes, we monitor and support those placements to ensure strong, healthy family bonds. These services provide care for 250 children nightly. The Counseling Program is a licensed provider of mental/behavioral health services for children birth through 17-years. We specialize in trauma, attachment and bonding, and other family dynamic issues. An additional program provides residential care for unaccompanied minor children entering the United States and reunifies them with waiting family.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Prevention is embodied in the Family Education/Safe Kids Maricopa program offering free classes, workshops, and events to teach positive parenting skills and reduce the possibilities of child abuse, neglect, or unintentional injury. Offerings are free of charge and serve the general public.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Early Education operates through two centers, one in Phoenix and the other in Mesa. Each center offers an Early Head Start and Preschool Programs serving low-income children ages birth through 5-years, preparing them for successful kindergarten entry and their families. Program social workers work with families to identify challenges and execute methodologies to overcome those challenges, ultimately ensuring families can better support their child’s educational career. Each day, we provide care for 250 children in this program.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator 4-Star Rating - 6th consecutive year 2020

Awards

Losos Prize for Excellence 2013

Parents As Teachers

Blue Ribbon Affiliate 2017

Parents as Teachers

All Children-All Families Leader in Supporting and Serving LGBTQ Youth and Families Seal of Recognit 2018

Human Rights Campaign

5-Star Rating Phoenix Early Education Center 2013

First Things First/Quality First

5-Star Rating Mesa Early Education Center 2019

First Things First/Qualify First

Distinguished Service Award for Direct Service/Advocacy 2020

Arizona Attorney General Office of Victim Services

Affiliations & memberships

Safe Kids Worldwide 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of unduplicated youth served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Direct services to unduplicated children (ages 0-17 years) across all programs of the agency.

Number of unduplicated parents/caregivers served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of unduplicated individuals (age 18 or over) served across all programs.

Number of emergency bed nights

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Intervention Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total number of nights of care provided across all Child Crisis Arizona programs.

Number of parent/caregiver workshops offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Prevention Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We offer classes (with multiple sessions), workshops, support groups, legal clinics, and family activity nights. Added in 2019 was the Safe Kids Maricopa program to prevent childhood injury.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Child Crisis Arizona is a community-minded, growth-focused organization. Our mission is to provide children and youth in Arizona a safe environment, free from abuse and neglect, by creating strong and successful families. We have been focused on strategic organizational growth in response to unmet community need. Strategic organizational goals include having:
- Best People - recruit, retain and develop professionals focused on passion, positivity, and respect
- Best Programs - Impactful and sustainable growth of programs, infrastructure, facilities with a focus on quality
- Best Resources - Increase revenue with a greater financial viability
- Best Brand - High quality public image and community relationships to support agency as a leading nonprofit

To achieve organizational strategic goals, Child Crisis Arizona has established measurable Key Performance Indicators (KPI). Each of these indicators are continually tracked with progress reporting on a quarterly basis. Different percentage targets have been established to signify if we are almost meeting standard, meeting standard, exceeding standard, or significantly exceeding standards. KPI include:
• Improve employee retention rate
• Implement Council of Accreditation Standards
• Maintain financial viability
• Positive annual change in net assets
• Maintain donor retention rate to meet or exceed industry standards, and
• Based on process measurement with an established timeline, prepare the organization for an integrated fundraising campaign.

Child Crisis Arizona offers 44 years’ experience in providing services for homeless children, the victims of the crimes of abuse or neglect, and to low-income families. Over the past five years, we have made considerable strides in meeting all nonprofit best practices for financial health as well as established an endowment fund to help ensure the future. We have assembled a stable, experienced, and dedicated leadership team focused on achieving organizational goals. We have used a wide variety of marketing strategies to cement our brand image and support our reputation as a quality service provider. To provide further assurance of our best practices, Child Crisis Arizona is pursuing agency-wide accreditation through the Council on Accreditation, which we expect to achieve within the coming year. This accreditation will encompass not only program delivery, but all agency operations. With the advent of the coronavirus pandemic, we have proven ourselves a nimble organization, able to quickly pivot to meet environmental circumstances yet not only maintain, but enhance, program services.

Child Crisis Arizona is confident that, given all of these factors, we are poised to and capable of achieving organizational strategic goals.

Child Crisis Arizona has achieved the following:
Agency wide accreditation by the Council on Accreditation granted February 2021
• Distinguished Service Award for Direct Service/Advocacy from the Arizona Attorney General Office of Victim Services – Awarded April 2020
• All Children – All Families Leader in Supporting and Serving LGBTQ Youth and Families Seal of Recognition – Awarded 2018 and renewed in 2019 by the Human Rights Campaign.
• Five-Star Rating of the Phoenix Early Education Center (Early Head Start and Preschool) conferred by Quality First/First Things First, 2013 and continually renewed. The Mesa Early Education Center received a 5-Star rating in 2019, the first year of its participation. This places the Early Education Services Program in the top tier of early childhood education programs in Arizona.
• Blue Ribbon Affiliate, awarded by Parents as Teachers, in recognition of the high quality of the Home Visitation Program and its fidelity to the Parents as Teachers model. Awarded October 11, 2017 and valid through September 30, 2022.
• Losos Prize for Excellence Award in 2013 recognizing creative initiatives that realize the Parents as Teachers vision for the Home Visitation Program.
• Commitment to Transparency seal awarded by Intelligent Philanthropy, 2016 – renewed 2017
• Charity Navigator, 4-Star Rating (the highest possible) – renewed 2020 for 6th consecutive year.
• GuideStar Nonprofit Profile, Platinum seal of transparency renewed 2020

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Using direct feedback from low-income clients served and in response to the challenges they faced with the COVID-19 pandemic, Child Crisis Arizona created a new service, the distribution of a free, warm evening meal for every member of the family once weekly. We are serving approximately 600 meals weekly and engaging local restaurants and donors in creating this immediate and positive outcome. As of this writing, we have distributed over 20,000 meals!

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Child Crisis Arizona
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Child Crisis Arizona

Board of directors
as of 5/28/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Byron Sarhangian

Snell and Wilmer, LLP

Term: 2021 - 2021


Board co-chair

Mr. Van Welch

Community Volunteer

Term: 2021 - 2021

Jeff Friesen

Bank and Trust Enterprise

Lea Phillips

Ballard Spahr, LLP

Doug Diehl

Northern Trust Company

Donna Easterly

APS

Frank Gorman

UMB Bank, N.A.

Steve Herman

Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company

Flor Kim

General Dynamics Mission Systems

Emily Koslow

C&K CPA PLC

John Lewis

National Bank of Arizona

Kelsey Lurie

EHS Policy Council Chairperson

Laura Noone

Ashford University

Karilee Ramaley

Salt River Project

Pilar Vargas

United Healthcare

Trevor Wilde

Wilde Wealth Management Group

Larry Wilk

Jaburg and Wilk, PC

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/24/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/24/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.