Human Services

Child Crisis Arizona

Safe Kids. Strong Families.

Mesa, AZ   |  www.childcrisisaz.org

Mission

To provide Arizona's children a safe environment, free from abuse and neglect, by creating strong and successful families.

Ruling year info

1976

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Torrie Taj CFRE

Main address

817 N. Country Club Drive

Mesa, AZ 85201 USA

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Formerly known as

Crisis Nursery, Inc.

Child Crisis Center

EIN

86-0324144

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Family Services (P40)

Child Day Care (P33)

Foster Care (P32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Child Crisis Arizona addresses two broad community problems. First, child abuse and neglect and, second, the need for early childhood education especially in low-income communities. For over 40 years, we have sought to prevent child abuse and neglect through parent/caregiver education through the Family Education/Safe Kids Maricopa Programs. We also intervene when child abuse or neglect has occurred by providing head-to-toe, around-the-clock care for children removed from their birth families for severe maltreatment. Programs include the Emergency Children's Shelter, Group Home, Foster Care and Adoption, and Counseling Programs. To meet the need for early education, we run two early education centers offering Early Head Start and Preschool Programs, both located in low-income areas.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency Children's Shelter Program

We offer the only emergency shelter for children ages birth to 10-years removed from their families for abuse, neglect, or other maltreatment in Maricopa County, Arizona. We also provide free care for children voluntarily placed by their families in times of duress when no other care options are available. We provide everything from basic needs (food, clothing, shelter) to educational needs to medical, dental, and behavioral health needs. In 2017, we served 236 children.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
Budget
$1,842,050

Provide courses and workshops free of charge (occasional workbook fee) that promote learning and development of contemporary parenting skills in a non-judgmental environment. In 2017, we provided services to 2,451 unduplicated individuals.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Budget
$450,350

Provide licensing (for foster parents) or certification (for adoptive parents), work with those families to include foster or adoptive children in their homes, and support the families and placed children to assure a harmonious relationship. In 2017, we worked with 564 licensed/certified individuals, placed 420 children into their homes, and finalized 106 adoptions.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
Adults
Budget
$1,645,950

Offer early childhood education, serving some of the lowest income zip codes in Maricopa County, ensuring that children are ready to enter school prepared for success. (Early Head Start is free. Preschool charges a modest $40/month for full-time, year-round child care and education to the children of qualified "working poor” parents).

Population(s) Served
Infants to preschool (under age 5)
Adults
Budget
$4,300,700

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator

Charity Navigator 4-Star Rating 2018

Awards

Losos Prize for Excellence 2013

Parents As Teachers

Blue Ribbon Affiliate 2017

Parents as Teachers

All Children-All Families Leader in Supporting and Serving LGBTQ Youth and Families Seal of Recognit 2018

Human Rights Campaign

5-Start Rating Phoenix Early Education Center 2013

First Things First/Quality First

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of unduplicated youth served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Direct services to unduplicated children (ages 0-17 years) across all programs of the agency.

Number of unduplicated parents/caregivers served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of unduplicated individuals (age 18 or over) served across all programs.

Number of emergency bed nights

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years)

Related Program

Emergency Children's Shelter Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In addition to the Emergency Children's Shelter for children birth through 10-years, Child Crisis Arizona added a Group Home for boys ages 10 through 17-years in August 2019.

Number of parent/caregiver workshops offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Parenting & Education Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We offer classes (with multiple sessions), workshops, support groups, legal clinics, and family activity nights. Added in 2019 was the Safe Kids Maricopa program to prevent childhood injury.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Child Crisis Arizona is a community-minded, growth-focused organization. Our mission is to provide children and youth in Arizona a safe environment, free from abuse and neglect, by creating strong and successful families. We have been focused on strategic organizational growth in response to unmet community need. Strategic organizational goals include having: - Best People - recruit, retain and develop professionals focused on passion, positivity, and respect - Best Programs - Impactful and sustainable growth of programs, infrastructure, facilities with a focus on quality - Best Resources - Increase revenue with a greater financial viability - Best Brand - High quality public image and community relationships to support agency as a leading nonprofit

Child Crisis Arizona has recently developed a Board-approved Strategic and Operational Plan. The plan outlines goals set during merger process and CEO recruitment for the following multi-year strategic initiatives: 1) Create & Define Agency, 2) Organizational Culture, 3) Earned Revenue & Fundraising, and 4) Marketing Communications & Advocacy. Poised to grow our presence, we created and invested in a position dedicated to elevating the organization's strategic efforts. While employing Chief Strategy Officers has been common practice for years in the corporate world, it has only recently been adopted by nonprofits. Working in close concert with the CEO, the Strategic Initiatives Director is future-oriented, maintaining laser-focus on increasing the number, breadth, and strength of our own and collaborative efforts.

On April 1, 2015, Crisis Nursery (Phoenix) and the Child Crisis Center (Mesa) officially merged, bringing together 71 years of combined experience in providing crisis services to vulnerable children and strengthening families in Central Arizona. Both agencies shared a culture focused on proven outcomes, a passion to protect Arizona's most vulnerable children from abuse and neglect, and a desire to help build strong families. We are now Child Crisis Arizona. The merger of two solidly-grounded organizations creates a positive financial outlook now and into the future. Both founding organizations were debt-free and donations have remained steady. Prior to merger, the average agency Administration and Fundraising cost was 21% of total budget. Now, Child Crisis Arizona's overhead cost is 19% of budget — a reduction of 2% in less than one year. Funds saved through operational efficiencies are invested in direct service expenditures. For more than 30 years, we have successfully met budgetary needs for high-quality services through philanthropic support. Child Crisis Arizona practices a balanced fund development plan consisting of individual donations, corporate and foundation grants, an active volunteer program, and well-established special events. We are confident in our ability to continue to raise the needed funds to maintain and grow vital community services.<br/><br/>In addition to our agency's independent capacity and strengths, we are deliberately investing in strategic growth with partnerships and cross-agency collaborations. These partnerships will expand the depth of services and resources we can offer low-income, families in, or on the verge of, crises. Each organization's programs serve as potential entry points for families in crisis and can open the door to finding the help they need.

Tracking Investment in Strategic Growth: The effectiveness of the Strategic Initiatives Director will be tracked by the number and depth of partnerships Child Crisis Arizona develops. Additionally, tracking how clients come to find our programs will be indicative of how our reach is expanding throughout Maricopa County.<br/><br/>Tracking Expansion of Community-Based Education Model: Taking our parenting education classes out into the community means we expect to serve a more geographically-diverse population. We can track this success by comparing the concentration of clients we serve in each Maricopa County zip code. Additionally, the curricula we use for our classes has evaluative criteria, often taking the form of pre- and post-surveys. We use the results of these evaluations to measure success of our education classes.<br/><br/>Tracking Foster Care & Adoption Recruitment: The success of the Child Crisis Arizona Foster Care & Adoption Program is determined by the number of homes licensed or certified, the number of children placed in those homes, satisfactory reports from our foster/adoptive parents, and through the regular monitoring and evaluation of those placements by qualified professionals. We also aim to continue experiencing a disruption rate of less than the national average.

Child Crisis Arizona has achieved the following: • Distinguished Service Award for Direct Service/Advocacy from the Arizona Attorney General Office of Victim Services – Awarded April 2020 • All Children – All Families Leader in Supporting and Serving LGBTQ Youth and Families Seal of Recognition – Awarded 2018 and renewed in 2019 by the Human Rights Campaign. • Five-Star Rating of the Phoenix Early Education Center (Early Head Start and Preschool) conferred by Quality First/First Things First, 2013 and continually renewed. The Mesa Early Education Center received a 5-Star rating in 2019, the first year of its participation. This places the Early Education Services Program in the top tier of early childhood education programs in Arizona. • Blue Ribbon Affiliate, awarded by Parents as Teachers, in recognition of the high quality of the Home Visitation Program and its fidelity to the Parents as Teachers model. Awarded October 11, 2017 and valid through September 30, 2022. • Losos Prize for Excellence Award in 2013 recognizing creative initiatives that realize the Parents as Teachers vision for the Home Visitation Program. • Commitment to Transparency seal awarded by Intelligent Philanthropy, 2016 – renewed 2017 • Charity Navigator, 4-Star Rating (the highest possible) – renewed 2018 for 4th consecutive year. • GuideStar Nonprofit Profile, Platinum seal of transparency renewed 2020

Financials

Child Crisis Arizona
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Child Crisis Arizona

Board of directors
as of 4/30/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Doug Diehl

Northern Trust

Term: 2018 -


Board co-chair

Ms. Karilee Ramaley

Salt River Project

Term: 2018 -

Cynthia Coffman

Arizona State University

Larry Wilk

Jaburg & Wilk, PC

Louis Basile, Jr.

Wildflower Bread Company

Alesha Corey

Above and Beyond Communications, LLC

Kate Cas

Versum Materials

Nicole Garcia

Arizona State University

Frank Gorman

UMB Bank, N.A.

Henry Hoffer

Nationwide Insurance Company

Emily Koslow

Ernst & Young LLP

Mary Michel

Community Volunteer

Noelle Miller

General Dynamics Mission Systems

Laura Montijo

Early Head Start Policy Council

Lisa Nothum

Northern Trust

Cliff Richeson

Wells Fargo Bank

Bryan Sandler

Sandler Law Group, LLC

Byron Sarjangian

Snell & Wilmer, LLP

Timothy Stocker

Classic Car Spa

Eileen Sullivan

Sullivan Law Firm, PC

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/30/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Keywords

child abuse, child neglect, family support, family crisis, child crisis, parenting education, early childhood education