YAVAPAI HUMANE SOCIETY

Where every animal counts

Prescott, AZ   |  www.yavapaihumane.org

Mission

The YHS mission is to promote and protect the health, safety, and welfare of companion animals. YHS envisions the day when every pet born has a good home and is well cared for all of its life. Our goal is to create happiness by bringing pets and people together. We empower our communities to make humane choices and are committed to eliminating euthanasia as a means of fighting pet homelessness and overpopulation.

Ruling year info

1972

Executive Director

Mr. Rich McClish

Main address

1625 Sundog Ranch Rd.

Prescott, AZ 86301 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

86-0327745

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Yavapai Humane Society is working to promote and protect the health, safety, and welfare of all companion animals in our community. We work to reduce pet overpopulation and fight pet homelessness by offering affordable spay/neuter services, educating on responsible pet ownership, and providing community support services to keep pets in the home. Within our animal shelter we provide high quality medical and behavioral care and work hard to match adoptable animals with their forever homes.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Animal Shelter

Yavapai Humane Society shelters and protects more than 3,000 animals each year. These animals are brought to Yavapai Humane by the Animal Control agencies of Prescott, Prescott Valley, and Yavapai County if they animal has been abandoned, abused, or neglected, or if it has been seized because of a bite incident and must undergo quarantine. Animals are also brought to the shelter by the public, whether they have found a stray animal, or if they can no longer care for it due to moving, medical needs, financial inability, or behavioral problems. Yavapai Humane Society provides warm shelter, in-kennel comforts such as toys and beds, a nutritious diet, clean water, and loving care by our compassionate staff and volunteers.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Yavapai Humane Society cares for nearly 9,500 owned animals in the community through its affordable Spay/Neuter & Wellness Clinic. This program promotes overall animal wellness and spay/neuter to fight pet overpopulation and homelessness. In addition, a scholarship program is available (called "The Big Fix") to spay/neuter pets owned by low-income residents for only $25. The Clinic also offers low-cost vaccinations on a first-come, first-served basis every Friday in addition to microchipping, feline leukemia and heartworm tests and preventative medicines like Frontline and HeartGuard.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Safety Net helps pets and their families stay together during difficult financial times or dislocations, hospitalizations, evictions, domestic violence displacements and other sad situations. Often families face crises that prompt abandonment of a beloved pet, even though the crisis is likely to be temporary.

Safety Net provides foster placement, veterinary help, counseling and other remedies that can help prevent a pet losing its home and family because of temporary crisis by helping a family weather the storm.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

Yavapai Humane Society firmly believes that we should do everything in our power to find every animal a forever home. The New Hope program is the means by which we maximize animal and shelter resources by partnering and supporting other animal welfare organizations. Each year we transfer out approximately 200 animals and transfer in approximately 200 animals so that they have the resources they need to start a new life.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Yavapai Humane Society's Second Chance Medical Program is designed to provide needed veterinary care to injured or sick animals whose owners are unable to afford normal veterinary rates.

The Second Chance Program, funded by donations and grants, will provide non-basic, non-emergency medical care to pets belonging to clients qualified using Federal Poverty Level guidelines.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Yavapai Humane Society's Equine Program is an adoption-focused program for horses in need of rehabilitation. Equines are received into our program from community members--whether they are unable to financially, behaviorally, or physically care for the horses any longer.

All horse adoptions come with medical and training records, vaccinations, hoof and dental work, and all horses are parasite-free. Prior to adoption, our horses have undergone our ethical training program to learn basic behaviors on the ground and, if applicable, while being ridden.

The Equine Center, located in Chino Valley, Arizona, opened its doors in June 4, 2016. It provides an innovative environment that meets the essential needs of equines, including: free movement with choice and variation in the environment via a track that parallels the perimeter of the property, constant access to hay which promotes better digestion, social housing and interaction with other equines, and comfortable resting areas and shelters from sun and inclement weather.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Medical treatment and rehabilitation of shelter pets. Yavapai Humane Society is fortunate to have a full-time veterinarian on staff and top-of-the-line medical equipment thanks to generous donors. These assets allow us to provide treatment for every homeless animal in need, from simple spay/neuter procedures all the way up to complex orthopedic and dental surgeries.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Yavapai Humane Society employs Animal Behavior Consultants to lead a behavioral rehabilitation and enrichment program at our shelter.

An enrichment program attempts to make life at the shelter the best it can be in every possible way for the animals, staff, volunteers and the public. Enrichment makes sure the best in a shelter's homeless pets is always on display making them more adoptable.

The consequence of not having a robust enrichment program in an animal shelter is dire; pets may become less adoptable over time. They can become hyperactive, bored, anxious, frustrated, lose housetraining skills, and dogs may develop an uncontrolled exuberance at seeing people or withdraw and isolate themselves in fear. All these outcomes diminish an animal's quality of life and their chance at adoption.

However, with an enrichment program pets can learn and retain valuable skills that make them happier and more adoptable.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Society of Animal Welfare Administrators 2012

American Humane Association 2012

Chamber of Commerce 2012

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Animal Shelter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Low Cost Spay/Neuter & Wellness Clinic

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These metrics only consist of the shelter animals spayed/neutered at our Adoptions Center Clinic, due to the Spay/Neuter & Wellness Clinic being temporarily closed, since 2020.

Total dollars of operating costs per animal per day

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Animal Shelter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Costs are an average per animal which account for the average length of stay and typical care, including sheltering, food, spay/neuter, core vaccinations, and microchipping.

Average number of days of shelter stay for animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Behavioral Enrichment and Rehabilitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Average length of stay represents dog/cat at the Adoptions Center and does not include average length of stay of equines, as mandatory quarantine and typical rehabilitation is necessarily longer.

Number of animals euthanized

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Homeless Animal Medical Treatment

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Humane Euthanasia numbers reported here only illustrate shelter-determined euthanasia and not owner-intended euthanasia. YHS maintains a No Kill Ethic and annual live release rate of 94.55%.

Number of animals with freedom from hunger and thirst

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Animal Shelter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Results reflect the number of animals sheltered and fed by YHS. On average, 40% of stray animals are returned to their owners while the rest go through our adoptions process.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1) To provide top quality behavioral and medical care and finding as many positive outcomes for homeless pets as possible, eliminating euthanasia as a means of animal control and maintaining a 90%+ live release rate.
2) To remain at the forefront of the animal welfare movement by developing and implementing innovative and replicable programs that reduce the number of healthy and treatable animals euthanized in our nation's shelters.
3) To continue building collaborations and partnerships with both animal welfare and human service organizations to enhance the quality of life for our community and their pets.
4) To serve as a model for other animal welfare organizations globally by sharing knowledge and expertise so they can achieve similar results by replicating successful life-saving programs for animals.
5) To educate our community, the nation and the world about the critical role spay/neuter plays in controlling pet over-population and find new and innovative ways to provide these life-saving programs and services at low or no cost to populations living at or below federally defined poverty levels.

Yavapai Humane Society's vast array of progressive programs serve and support both the animals and the residents of our community. They include innovative offerings to keep pets in the home and provide support to pet owners through financial difficulties such as a temporary boarding program, medical treatment for low income pet owners, discounted spay/neuter services, and behavioral consultation. Within our sheltering system we must keep our behavior treatment program, run by full time employed Animal Behavior Consultants, and our medical treatment programs strong with the support of the public and foundations.

1) A compassionate mission driven workforce.
2) A strong infrastructure designed to support our mission with diversified funding sources.
3) Flexibility in adapting programs to the ever-changing needs of our community and the animals.
4) Setting high standards, expecting stellar results from all of our programs …continually raising our own “bar".

Program related success includes:
• Receiving funding to purchase equipment for our veterinary clinic, thereby expanding services to both shelter and the public's animals.
• Finding loving homes for more than 3,000 lost or homeless cats, dogs, and horses annually.
• Spaying or neutering, and providing basic wellness services to nearly 9,500 owned pets each year who will never again contribute to pet homelessness and overpopulation!
• Vaccinating thousands of pets to help ensure disease in our community is reduced.
• Getting a message of responsible pet ownership and a heightened reverence for life to tens of thousands through our radio broadcast, TV spots, newspaper columns, special events and programs. The future of our programs include proactive outreach to prevent animals from being separated from their family members due to temporary circumstances or socioeconomic disadvantages.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Suggestion box/email, Personal messages and comments via social media,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

YAVAPAI HUMANE SOCIETY
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

YAVAPAI HUMANE SOCIETY

Board of directors
as of 09/11/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Judy Dahlbeck

Julie Ellegood

Vice President

Paul Reichert

Treasurer

Jack Swarsbrook

Secretary

Suzanne Vermilya

Board Member

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/10/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/10/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.