Interfaith Community Services

Where Help Brings Hope

aka ICS   |   Tucson, AZ   |  www.icstucson.org

Mission

Interfaith Community Services (ICS) serves Pima County, Arizona including the greater Tucson metropolitan area. ICS helps people in need achieve stable, healthy and independent lives

Ruling year info

1986

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Tom McKinney

Main address

2820 W Ina Road

Tucson, AZ 85741 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Northwest Interfaith Center

EIN

86-0520997

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Interfaith Community Services (ICS) works to help low-income and financially distressed individuals and families prevent homelessness, alleviate hunger and build their longer-term self-sufficiency through wrap-around services that seek to address the root causes of poverty and involve recipients in identifying and overcoming barriers to their economic self-reliance.

ICS also works to enable aging, frail and/or low-income seniors and disabled adults to maintain their independence for as long as possible and to age in place with dignity and safety in the comfort of their own homes preventing higher cost institutionalized care before they are ready.

ICS seeks to build health and well-being in Pima County and reduce harmful stigmas through mental health and whole health education and outreach.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency financial assistance

Families and individuals in financial crisis due to illness or unforeseen life circumstances receive temporary assistance with prescription medications, food, or rent or utilities to avoid homelessness. We also assist individuals seeking employment with the basic resources required to start work, such as identification, certification or work boots.

Population(s) Served
Adults

ICS partners with the Community Food Bank to distribute its monthly emergency food boxes and supplements those with the proceeds of food drives and donations from our member faith communities, local businesses and the community at large. It distributed more than $2.9worth of food in fiscal year 2017. The ICS food bank is the only food bank in Pima County that is open six days a week.

Population(s) Served
Adults

ICS operates the Mobile Meals program in the Tucson area north of Roger Road, east of Interstate 10, south of Rancho Vistoso and west of Craycroft Road. Its volunteers deliver an insulated package of one hot meal and one cold meal five days a week, 52 weeks a year.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

ICS connects its volunteers with seniors and disabled residents of Pima County who needs transportation to medical appointments and shopping, home repairs, friendly visits and welfare calls.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

ICS staff and volunteers provide workshops in mental health awareness, advance care planning and congregation health.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Provides assistance with skills assessment, job searching, resume writing and interview coaching as well as computer and financial literacy workshops to help individuals increase employability and find or maintain employment to build self-sufficiency

Population(s) Served
Adults

Both the Helping Hands for Single Moms Tucson (HHT) and ICS Boards voted at the end of September to integrate the HHT program into ICS under its new name, Single Mom Scholars. ICS is a recognized partner in Pima County for its expertise in providing basic needs services as well as its strong commitment to help those in crisis build self-sufficiency. Adding the HHT program to the ICS continuum of services will provide greater resources to benefit Tucson’s single mom college students and create a comprehensive approach to reduce generational poverty and provide long-term solutions for self-sufficiency. While ICS continues to grow its resources for emergency assistance, the addition of the Single Mom Scholars program will triple the investment of ICS in self-sufficiency programs.

Population(s) Served
Parents

Where we work

Awards

Meyer and Libby Marmis Humanitarian Award 2010

Jewish Foundation of Southern Arizona

Nonprofit of the Year Pinnacle Award 2010

Northern Pima County Chamber of Commerce

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people aged 65+ receiving home care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors

Related Program

Caregiving services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Seniors served by ICS through transportation, mobile meals and social supports

Number of households that obtain/retain permanent housing for at least 6 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency financial assistance

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Homelessness prevention through emergency rent assistance up to 3 months.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

ICS exists to help people in need achieve stable, healthy and independent lives.

ICS offers emergency assistance to prevent homelessness, address food insecurity and ensure that low-income individuals can keep their lights and utilities connected.

ICS provides transportation to medical appointments and grocery stores, along with mobile meals and friendly visiting to enable lonely, isolated and low-income seniors to live independently at home, as long as possible.

In addition, ICS offers community health education focused on mental health awareness, resources and access to advance care planning to our faith community partners, individuals and the community at large.

ICS leverages the caring power and resources of over 120 partner faith communities, mobilizing 45 staff and 1000 volunteers to serve nearly 50,000 people in need each year with approximately $6 million in resources.

In 2020, ICS served nearly 47,000 individuals and saw average increases of 34% in self-sufficiency (income, housing and employment) and 60-91% increases in the ability to live with independence, ranging from mobility to access to community resources.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    People in financial crisis, at risk for homelessness, seniors and disabled adults, single mothers in college, children and families.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.),

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Interfaith Community Services
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Interfaith Community Services

Board of directors
as of 10/19/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Rhonda Fure

Beach Fleischman

Term: 2021 - 2023

Barry Robinson

Corporate Public Affairs (retired)

Scott Summerford

Senior Vice President, Wells Fargo Wealth Management

Mike Lange

Attorney (retired)

Rhonda Fure

Senior Manager/CPA, BeachFleischman PC

Jeffrey Sklar

Attorney, Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie LLP

Lidia Allen

Corporate Controller/Finance Specialist (retired)

Roger Grimes

Orthopedic Surgeon (retired)

Patricia Harrison-Monroe

Director, Community Outreach/Clinical Development, University of Arizona College of Medicine

J. Robert Hendricks

Professor/School Superintendent (retired)

Darryl Landau

Insurance (retired)

Karen Mlawsky

Chief Operating Officer, Tucson Medical Center

Steve Pollyea

Marketing Executive (retired), Immediate Past Board Chair

Karen Schumacher

Information Technology Professional

Rev. Jim Toole

Pastor, St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church

Marti Vargas

Chief Administrative Officer, PPEP Inc.

Rev. Anita Slovak

Rector, Christ the King Episcopal Church

Ed Jenkins

CPA (retired),

Ryan Admissions Coordinator

Pima Community College

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/08/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data