UMOM New Day Centers Inc

Restore Hope, Rebuild Lives and End Homelessness

aka UMOM   |   Phoenix, AZ   |  http://www.umom.org

Mission

The mission of UMOM is to restore hope, rebuild lives, and end homelessness.

Ruling year info

1999

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Jackson Fonder

Main address

3333 E Van Buren St

Phoenix, AZ 85008 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

86-0521062

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Employment Training (J22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

UMOM strives to keep people safe, healthy, and off of the street. UMOM believes that our community cannot allow for parents and children to be living on the streets, waiting to access a high quality and low barrier shelter. The need is urgent, and the lasting impact of our community's inability to provide immediate shelter can affect generations of the families who are struggling.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Family Emergency Shelter

UMOM's New Day Centers family emergency shelter campus provides shelter, programs and services for families with dependent children. Programs and services include basic needs (shelter, meals, clothing and hygiene), on-site programs for youth, on-site health and wellness care, and workforce development/employment/education services. UMOM's family emergency shelter serves up to 160 families each night, over 600 families each year.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

This program provides rapid access to housing for homeless families and individuals, with supportive services following housing.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims of crime and abuse
Health
Women and girls

UMOM's Halle Women's Center provides emergency shelter programs and services for up to 130 homeless women each night, approximately 700 women annually. Programs and services include basic needs (shelter, meals, clothing and hygiene), on-site health and wellness care, and workforce development/employment/education services.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Transgender people
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims of crime and abuse

At UMOM New Day Centers, we use social enterprise to change lives. UMOM's Homegrown Training program is offered to clients throughout all UMOM shelter and housing programs. Trainees are engaged in "back of house" food service training and "front of house" barista training utilizing the Starbucks curriculum.

Population(s) Served

UMOM believes that housing + income is the formula and solution to successfully ending homelessness for the most vulnerable people in our community; and our Workforce Development program exists to equip our vulnerable population with the skills and tools to obtain upwardly mobile career opportunities.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

UMOM believes that housing + income = ends homelessness. To address the sever shortage of affordable housing in Maricopa County, UMOM has developed 10 Affordable Housing complexes to day with a total of over 600 units.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Length of Stay in Family Emergency Shelter

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Family Emergency Shelter

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Families in Emergency Shelter can stay up to 120 days. Because of the programs and services provided for the families served by UMOM, the average length of time in shelter is less than 120 days.

Percent of single women exiting Women's Shelter to permanent affordable housing.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Women

Related Program

Emergency Shelter for Homeless Single Women

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

% of single women exiting Women's Shelter to permanent housing.

Percent of families exiting transitional shelter who secure Permanent Affordable Housing.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Family Emergency Shelter

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

% of households exiting shelter to permanent housing.

Number of people no longer living in unsafe or substandard housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Family Emergency Shelter

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Annual number of families served in Emergency Shelter

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

At UMOM we believe that everyone deserves the opportunity for a better life. UMOM does not manage homelessness: we end homelessness. To accomplish this, we know that the formula to success is housing + income = ending homelessness. This approach to housing and income sets up clients to self-resolve their homelessness than a traditional approach to shelter that does not have an integrated workforce development component to the program design.

UMOM serves families with dependent children and single women experiencing homelessness in Maricopa County. Our programs operate in alignment with the Housing First model where providing permanent housing serves as a platform for our clients to pursue personal goals and improve their quality of life.

We firmly believe that the homeless system is a crisis response system. UMOM is guided by the principle that homelessness should be rare, brief, and non-recurring. UMOM’s emergency shelter programs are designed to end homelessness for the most vulnerable and at-risk households in Maricopa County. UMOM has the least restrictive criteria of any other emergency shelter in Maricopa County and offers a service-rich environment to meet the needs of the most complex clients.

UMOM also operates Rapid Rehousing, Supportive Housing, and Permanent Supportive Housing programs. UMOM’s Rapid Rehousing program helps families to quickly exit homelessness, return to housing in the community and not become homeless again. Additionally, UMOM assists with utility, rental, and childcare expenses as needed.

General Shelter Program Components: Intensive individualized client support--length of service varies by program type and client needs:
*1-on-1 case management
*Advocacy with property management companies, landlords, courts, and partnering agencies
*Employment support services to help individuals secure and maintain employment
*Connection to community resources Family Emergency Shelter

UMOM leverages the expertise and experience offered by our partners to ensure that clients receive the highest level of care. UMOM's case management team identifies the unique barriers to housing each client: employment, education, income, access to healthcare, childcare, food and nutrition. In identifying these barriers, UMOM can connect each client with our extensive network of partners to provide them access to the resources necessary for them to end their homelessness.

Founded in 1964, UMOM is Arizona's largest provider of services for families experiencing homelessness. UMOM has 57 years of experience serving the homeless population in the Phoenix Metropolitan area including 29 years of experience operating a full- service Emergency Shelter. As the largest provider of homeless services for families in Arizona, UMOM effectively leverages our programs spanning coordinated entry, shelter, housing, and supportive services to holistically serve the most vulnerable individuals and families in a coordinated and efficient manner.

UMOM's reputation as a valued and trusted partner results from our commitment to being data-driven and outcome accountable. UMOM is committed to using data to drive our decision making and as a result has invested in talent and systems to align our program efforts with our organizational strategy.

UMOM has a team of qualified and experienced individuals to accomplish our goals. We hire qualified individuals and provide ongoing training and exposure to the best programs, nationwide, so we can continually build both the quality and effectiveness of our programs.

UMOM serves nearly 15,000 unique individuals across all of our services annually. Approximately 7,000 of these individuals are served in UMOM’s shelter and housing programs. Last year, UMOM provided rapid rehousing to over 600 households experiencing homelessness. UMOM has developed over 400 of affordable housing in the community across seven different properties to address the lack of affordable housing in Phoenix. More properties are in the pipeline for development.

UMOM’s Workforce Development team assists clients with meeting their employment goals by conducting job training and job placement activities geared toward gaining and retaining employment. Over the last two years UMOM has assisted over 2,000 clients in shelter obtain employment. UMOM’s clients have often operated in “survival mode” for weeks or longer before entering our programs; thus, their stress levels are high, resulting negatively on their overall health and wellbeing. UMOM operates a Wellness Clinic at our shelter to provide direct medical, mental health and substance abuse services on-site.

UMOM is committed to continuous improvement through innovation in our program designs. One example of this is Homegrown Training which is a food service training program that delivers hands-on kitchen and barista training in UMOM’s own social enterprise Café and Residential Dining facilities under the guidance of chef instructors, expert staff members, and Homegrown program graduates. The ultimate goal of our Homegrown Training program is to avoid future homelessness.

Our Social Enterprise Program is a model member of the Catalyst Kitchen national network and has a direct partnership with Starbucks to hire our Homegrown graduates. UMOM clients can participate in this training program, gain skills, secure employment, and be eligible for free college through Starbucks’ partnership with Arizona State University. At UMOM, we use social enterprise to change lives.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    UMOM provides temporary emergency shelter and housing services to homeless families and single women.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    UMOM staff build rapport and trust with each client to understand their needs and barriers to ending their homelessness. Staff utilize feedback from clients to grow and better our programs. Through UMOM’s “Campus Council” we invite groups of clients to sit with our Shelter Manager to share feedback on programs, services, and the shelter facility. The feedback is reviewed by UMOM leadership to discuss and make adjustments as needed. Additionally, UMOM offers a QR code survey for clients to share their experience and answer questions focused on workforce services, case management, food, safety, and other programs. The survey feedback is reviewed by program staff as well as UMOM leadership.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Trust and rapport building are critical to the work UMOM does as our clients seek to supportive services, housing plan creation, and employment in order to end their homelessness.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

UMOM New Day Centers Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

UMOM New Day Centers Inc

Board of directors
as of 8/24/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Greg Gierwielaniec

CVS Health

Term: 2020 - 2023

Kristine Newman

McCarthy Building Companies, Inc.

Greg Gierwielaniec

CVS Caremark

James Wadsworth

Wells Fargo Bank

Jennifer Spina

APS

Matt Benjamin

Deloitte & Touche LLP - Retired

Katy Heth

SRP

Beth Katz

Katz Design Group

Scott Maxwell

Cresa

Craig Prichard

Summit Navigation

Paul VanDenBosch

Nationwide Insurance

Andrew Wyant

National Academy of Sports Medicine

Corey Rivard

Flexprint

Matt Chiarello

Snell & Wilmer

Alissa Castaneda

Quarles & Brady

Emily Tadano

Meritage Homes

Denise Allen

Solutions AEC

Elissa Brown

Western Alliance Bank

Crystal Chestnut

Elontec

Danielle Cloud

American Express

Susan Davis-Schultz

CopperPoint Insurance

Wendy Engelhardt

Sales & Marketing

Chad Hafstrom

Kenew, LLC

Arleen Kennedy

Balsz School District

Daniel King

Jones, Skelton & Hochuli

Theresa Krakauer

Russ Lyon Sotheby's International

Kari Luther

Goodmans Interior Structures

Karla Rameriz-Garsha

Candace Schwarz

McCarthy

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 08/10/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/10/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.