The Primavera Foundation, Inc.

Pathways Out of Poverty

aka Primavera Foundation   |   Tucson, AZ   |  www.primavera.org

Mission

The Primavera Foundation provides pathways out of poverty through safe, affordable housing, workforce development, and neighborhood revitalization.

Notes from the nonprofit

Thank you for visiting GuideStar to learn about the work of the Primavera Foundation. Since 1983, in partnership with donors, funders, volunteers, staff, community partners, and of course, the hard work of the participants we serve, Primavera has helped many thousands of individuals and families to overcome obstacles and access the resources needed to build stronger, more independent, stable, and sustainable lives. Our community is stronger and more vibrant when its members can survive, grow, contribute, and thrive. It is an honor and a privilege to be trusted to perform this body of work, and we are grateful to all of you who are by our side on this incredibly important, life-transforming pathway and journey.

Ruling year info

1995

Chief Executive Officer

Peggy Hutchison

Main address

151 W 40th St

Tucson, AZ 85713 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

86-0733182

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Primavera Foundation, Inc. (the “Organization”) was founded in 1983 to address the systemic causes of homelessness. The Organization’s mission is to provide pathways out of poverty through safe, affordable housing, workforce development, and neighborhood revitalization. The Organization’s vision, to promote economic and social justice while working to build a future in which all people are assured basic human rights, a livable income, and safe and affordable housing, remains a guiding principle for the Organization’s strategic direction.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency Services

HOMELESSNESS INTERVENTION & PREVENTION DROP-IN CENTER - An outreach center for homeless/unstably housed individuals/families. RAPID RE-HOUSING - helps find housing for those in the greatest need/at risk of homelessness. FAMILY PATHWAYS SHELTER PROGRAM - An emergency shelter program for families of any configuration with minor children currently experiencing homelessness. CASA PALOMA WOMEN'S HOSPITALITY CENTER & RESIDENCE - A safe space for women only who are experiencing homelessness, providing multiple essential services. Residential services in a women-only setting for women working toward their goals for self-sufficiency. MEN'S SHELTER - A safe space for men only experiencing homelessness - providing multiple essential services. PROJECT ACTION FOR VETERANS - Housing support services & temporary financial assistance to veterans & veteran families facing eviction or homelessness. RENT & UTILITY ASSISTANCE - A program that helps to prevent eviction for those at risk of homelessness.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

All of Primavera's rental housing properties provide affordable living spaces for those who are ready to make steps to integrate back into employment and/or a stable, more independent living environment.

• (3) 34th St. Properties
• Las Abuelitas Family Housing & Community Center
• Alamo Apartments
• Las Casitas Apartments
• Catalina House
• Five Points
• Adelante (Formerly Greyhound Family Shelter)
• Winstel Terrace Apartments
• Women in Transition

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

Primavera Works is a workforce development social enterprise staffing agency for men and women with barriers to employment (i.e., homelessness, former incarceration, physically challenging conditions, and returning veterans) by offering ethical, temporary labor services. The program is a continuum of services, including job readiness, job skill development, job coaching, employment retention, financial empowerment, and opportunities to obtain temp-to-hire positions through partnerships with local employers. Workers are placed on assignment such as supervised crews for residential and business jobs, including landscaping, bufflegrass removal, residential and business moves, janitorial contracts, housekeeping, apartment turns, water harvesting systems (design and installation), and more. The program also provides above-minimum wages, lunches, transportation, and worker supplies for participants.

Population(s) Served
Adults

There are multiple options for people who are further along on their pathway out of poverty and seek long-term financial empowerment. Down payment assistance, credit score repair/building, and mortgage assistance services are available. Homebuyer education teaches low-to-moderate-income families more than how to purchase and maintain a house; it teaches them how to live their dream of having a home to finally call their own.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

Primavera’s commitment to social & economic justice in the context of vibrant/revitalized neighborhoods has challenged the organization to integrate its neighborhood revitalization & community engagement activities. ANNUAL HOMELESS MEMORIAL – Annually we remember our neighbors, friends, and family who have passed away homeless in the past year. LAS ABUELITAS AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM - Open to anyone in the residential neighborhood. Programming fills a high need in the South Tucson neighborhood. HEALTHY SOUTH TUCSON - Primavera is partners with a strong, diverse multi-sector collaboration called Healthy South Tucson whose purpose is to enhance the quality of life within the South Tucson community. COMMUNITY GARDENS - We partner with community members & other agencies to help establish a network of community gardens, which provide many benefits that increase quality of life.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

Primavera’s commitment to social and economic justice in the context of vibrant and revitalized neighborhoods has challenged the organization to integrate its neighborhood revitalization and community engagement activities. The strategy is to integrate community development and community engagement by strengthening resident leadership development and organizing across sectors with multiple community partners in targeted neighborhoods. We are also committed to integrating green components into the organization’s strategic and operational plans with measurable outcomes for all lines of business, including emergency services, transitional housing, workforce development, property and asset management, homeownership promotion, education, preservation, neighborhood revitalization, and community engagement. Primavera’s dedication to “Go Green” reflects its commitment to building a more sustainable organization, and a more sustainable city, county, and state.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

Motivated participants benefit from a variety of financial empowerment and asset-building services. These include incentive-based savings plans, credit restoration services, homebuyer education, and homeownership opportunities. Achieving long-term financial success is definitely within reach. The Her Family is a program that assists single, head-of-household mothers and their daughters with educational opportunities and strategies for saving, budgeting, building assets, and becoming first-time homeowners, while often breaking multi-generational cycles of poverty in the process. The Mis Abuelitos is a program that assists grandparents raising their grandchildren covering the same topics for the same purpose.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Families

We partner with the community to offer free and public workshops several times a year that can help individuals with Arizona and federal convictions to restore their Civil Rights and set aside their convictions, intended for those who have already completed their sentences. The workshops are hosted by the Pima County Clerk of the Superior Court, the Civil Rights Restoration Clinic of the James E. Rogers College of Law, University of Arizona, the Office of the Pima County Public Defender, and Second Chance.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

NeighborWorks America

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) Accreditation 2021

Awards

Exemplary Rating past nine years 2016

NeighborWorks America

First Net Zero award issued for energy efficiency 2015

Pima County

Green Organization Designation 2014

NeighborWorks America

Las Abuelitas Family Housing Community will be featured in the Cooper, Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum "By the People: Designing a Better America" exhibition 2016

Smithsonian Institute

For the sixth year in a row, secured a contract worth over $1 million. 2017

Federal Department of Veterans Affairs

Nonprofit of Excellence & Affordable Housing 2016

NeighborWorks America

Primavera Works was selected as a talented leader running an employment-focused social enterprise. 2018

Roberts Enterprise Development Fund (REDF) Accelerator Fellow

Affiliations & memberships

NeighborWorks America - Member

Arizona Charitable Tax Credit Coalition - Member 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

2019-2020 FY

Revenue generated from our Primavera Cooks! summer dining fundraising series (85% directly benefits programs)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

2019-2020 FY Substantially decreased revenue due to COVID and restrictions.

Number of individuals who had their immediate health & safety needs met, including U.S. mail, essential supplies, phone message services, & ID cards

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

2019-2020 FY

Number of veterans & their families secured safe, affordable housing & 63% exited Project Action for Veterans with sustainable housing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2019-2020 FY

Number of women who were provided with meals, showers, laundry, & housing assistance at our Casa Paloma Hospitality Center & Residence

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

2019-2020 FY

Number of individuals who secured safe, affordable housing through our Rapid Re-Housing & Primavera’s 11 owned rental properties

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Affordable Rental Housing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

2019-2020 FY

Number of individuals who participated in workforce development opportunities, including job readiness training, and temporary employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Primavera Works Employment Service (Social Enterprise)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

2019-2020 FY

Number of Primavera Works participants with major barriers to employment secured jobs outside the program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Primavera Works Employment Service (Social Enterprise)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2019-2020 FY

Number of individuals who completed financial empowerment, homebuyer, &/or post-homeownership education for long-term success

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Financial Education & Empowerment

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

2019-2020 FY

Number of families who purchased their first home through the homeownership program representing over $3.4 million of positive economic impact in the community

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Homebuyer Education & Homeownership

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

2019-2020 FY

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization valued at over $143,014 ($28.54/hr independent sector rate)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

2019-2020 FY

Percentage of families secured stable housing as they exited our family shelter program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

2019-2020 FY

Total dollars received in contributions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2019-2020 FY

The number of consecutive years that Primavera has earned the highest possible ranking of "Exemplary" in multiple, three-year independent organizational reviews by NeighborWorks® America*

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

*Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation, a national organization that creates opportunities for people to live in affordable homes, improve their lives, and strengthens their communities.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

All of Primavera's programs work together to facilitate progress toward individual economic independence, long-term financial security, neighborhood investment, and community and civic engagement, with the goal of empowering the disenfranchised of our community to affect long-term positive change for themselves, their families, and their communities.

The Organization carries out its mission through community education, advocacy and organizing while providing a continuum of services that address homelessness, poverty, and neighborhood destabilization. All of the Organization’s programs facilitate progress towards individual economic independence, long-term financial security, neighborhood investment, community engagement, and movement building with the goal of empowering the disenfranchised of our community to affect longterm positive change for themselves, their families and their communities. The Organization’s primary sources of revenue are government contracts, foundation grants, unrestricted donations, rent from affordable rental housing, and earned revenue from the workforce development program, home ownership services, and neighborhood revitalization.

Primavera has customized data platforms that measure input, outcome, and impact at the participant level, program level, and neighborhood level. Each line of business has its own financial report designed to measure profit and loss. Every three years, we receive an on-site independent review by NeighborWorks America. We strive to be a learning organization that responds to critical needs in the community and is able to adopt innovative strategies in order to achieve greater impact. Our diverse board of directors continually expand Primavera's capability, by regular training, and contributing each of their unique areas of career expertise to the organization. We also have a dedicated volunteer workforce, which expands the organization's capacity to serve and widen its footprint in the community. We often serve as a mentor organization in peer-to-peer organizational exchanges and have been chosen to pilot many programs because of its demonstrated capabilities and strengths.

With more than one in five people living below the poverty threshold in the City of Tucson and Pima County's total poverty rate at 20%, the need for Primavera's programs continues to grow. As public sector investment in emergency services, affordable housing, and workforce development services decreases at the federal, state, and local level, Primavera has been working to grow its philanthropy and earned revenues. Unfortunately, Primavera's growth in these areas has not kept up with the demand for services. Primavera will continue to grow its philanthropy and earned revenues so that these critical services are ensured for the most marginalized members of the community.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    People living in poverty, i.e. low-income, marginalized, long-oppressed members of our community, those needing second chances (formerly incarcerated, rights restoration, lapses in employment, those with evictions on their rental records, and more), single head of household mothers and their children (Her Family program), grandparents raising grandchildren, first time home buyers, veterans, people experiencing or at risk of experiencing homelessness, social enterprise/temp agency workers, those in need of rapid-rehousing (due to eviction) and safe affordable rental housing options, those needing emergency shelter, those living on the streets in need of essential services, those needing assistance to get official forms of identification and government benefits, and more.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The creation of our REDI (Race, Equity, De-colonization, and Inclusion) leadership team, trainings, newsletters, and active strategies.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    People feel more included in the mission and vision of the organization, participate more openly, and contribute to more positive outcomes as a result of feeling valued, heard, and involved.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

The Primavera Foundation, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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The Primavera Foundation, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 11/15/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Samuel Swift

(President) Advisor/Shareholder - TCI Wealth Advisors

Term: 2017 - 2022

Gordon Packard

(Co-Founder) - d. 2018

Susan Tarrence

(Emeritus) Retired

Leslie Hunter

(Emeritus) Retired - City of Tucson Community Services

Andy Silverman, JD

(Emeritus) Professor Emeritus - James E. Rogers College of Law, The University of Arizona

Debbie Wong

(Emeritus) Retired - Vice-President, JP Morgan Chase

Maritza Broce

(Secretary) Owner - PreLoved Chica Clothing

Manny Mejias

Re-Entry Coordinator - Pima County Administration

David Wohl

(Treasurer) President - Sabino Community Development Resources

Adela Licona

(Co-Vice President) Director - The Art of Change Agency / Associate Professor Emeritus - The University of Arizona

Sami Hamed

Business Development Manager - SAAVI Services for the Blind

Nancy Bissell

(Co-Founder)

Elizabeth Rollings Friman

Attorney - Fleming & Curti, PLC

Patrick Lopez

Attorney - Mesch Clark Rothschild

David Garcia, Ph.D., FACSM

Assistant Professor - Mel & Enid Zuckerman School of Public Health, The University of Arizona

Kimberley Hoffman

(Co-Vice President) Arizona Licensed Insurance Agent

Anna Griessel

Owner - Creatista Films, Video, & Photography

Andy Rouse

Director - Translational Bioimaging Resources, The University of Arizona

Stefanie Teller

VP - Corporate Communications, Sundt Construction

Antonio Ramirez

Communications Director, Ward 1 Office

Trayce Peterson

Co-Founder/Producer, SplitSeed

Paul Koss

MD

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/29/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/29/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.