FAMILY PROMISE-GREATER PHOENIX

Scottsdale, AZ   |  www.familypromiseaz.org

Mission

To reduce family homelessness in Greater Phoenix by empowering a network of interfaith volunteers and community services, to provide shelter, compassion, assistance, and life skills training to return families to self sufficiency and sustainable housing.

Ruling year info

1999

Principal Officer

Mr. Ted D. Taylor

Main address

7447 E. Earll Dr.

Scottsdale, AZ 85251 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

86-0914408

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Family Promise - Greater Phoenix exists to quickly rescue families with children (and their pets) experiencing homelessness, and through a community-based solution, surround them with love, hope and resources to return them sustainable housing and lasting independence.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency Shelter Program

This program serves families with children who are experiencing homelessness in Maricopa County. There are four sites across the Valley plus a fifth one serving shelter graduates. Shelter services include lodging, food, hospitality, and social services. Family Promise Day Centers are hubs for daily living and case management.

Parents receive weekly Cash Flow and life skills trainings plus basic resources. They pursue goals of employment, savings, and next-step housing within 60 days. Children receive support for daycare and school enrollment. After school care is through Boys & Girls Clubs partnerships that lengthen the window parents can job search or work.

After a long, but productive day, families cherish being together and pampered. A large hosting network provides family-style meals, activities, and bedrooms for each family. In times of crisis, leaning on one another and newfound friendships gives families the strength that leads to success.

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

Now in its 10th year, the Pets With A Promise Program ensures no family member is separated just because they have to enter shelter. Family Promise-Greater Phoenix remains the only family shelter in Arizona to allow pets. Two of its four sites are pet-friendly.

Pets have their own kennel and families enjoy living room space and private outdoor space. Volunteers, donors, and special partnerships provide food, toys, treats, blankets, and beds, so the animals remain comfortable. It means the world to a child in need to know that not only are they being given a safe place to stay for the night (and for the next 60 nights), but they need not be separated from their furry best friend! Pets comfort the whole family. Many families would rather sleep in their car with their pet than be split up by the shelter system.

Family Promise welcomes them both. Its Pets With A Promise Program has sheltered cats, dogs, reptiles, birds, and all menagerie of animals.

Population(s) Served
Families

Since its inception, the Graduate Program, affectionately titled "Connections," has increased Family Promise's ability to serve even more families after their graduation from Emergency Shelter. Members have access to classes on budgeting, cash flow importance, parenting skills, stress and self care, and supplemental income. They also get special love through gifts and food boxes for major holidays.

This additional 24 months of connectivity allows staff to walk alongside the families as they continue in their journey to remain housed and self-sufficient. A continued community and support system extends compassion to each family's early months of next-step housing. It also reminds alumni guests that they are always considered Family.

Population(s) Served
Families

Helping at-risks families with past rent, utilities, or deposit assistance so parents and children can remain in a home together and never have to experience homelessness.

Population(s) Served
Families

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Mesa Chamber of Commerce 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of bed nights (nights spent in shelter)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Emergency Shelter Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of shelter nights provided by the faith community. Numbers will vary year to year due to size of family and length of stay.

Number of families served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Emergency Shelter Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of families with children served in Emergency Shelter.

Number of children and youth who have received access to stable housing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Emergency Shelter Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the number of children under the age of 18 served at Family Promise.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Emergency Shelter Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Volunteer hours are somewhat tricky to track...but we are blessed by our over 50 congregations who provide nearly 3,300 volunteers!

Number of sheltered animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Pets With A Promise Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Family Promise is the only family emergency shelter in the Valley that welcomes the "entire" family!

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Every child deserves a home. Sadly 1/3 of all homeless families will either surrender their children to foster care or have them removed from their custody. Our goal: keep families together as they go through this journey at Family Promise.

Family Promise is expanding our capacity to serve more families each year. We are also testing out a small shared housing program for graduate families to give them additional time, support, and padding before returning to independent living.

It is our desire to redefine family homelessness here in Maricopa County. We must focus on the kids and how we can impact their lives, forever changing the course of their future.

Lastly, Family Promise not only impacts the lives of the families we serve...we provide a way for the community to live out their desire to help others.

Family Promise - Greater Phoenix has a proven and efficient model of partnering with the faith community. Over 50 congregations (all faiths/Valley-wide) open their hearts and their doors to welcome our families into their places of worship for overnight hospitality.

Passionate volunteers prepare an evening meal and break bread with our families and their children. A special, private area has been prepared for each family, as they will be provided safe overnight shelter...right their at the congregation.

All food and shelter is provided by the community...along with hope and healing.

Our dedicated Social Work Team provides case management and resources to assist our families in attaining employment, housing and financial self-sufficiency.

In order to meet the growing need for family shelter, Family Promise has expanded to offer four staffed sites across the Valley. Our Graduate Program journeys with families another two years to further help them out of poverty.

Family Promise treasures the over 50 congregations who nightly host our families, as well as the nearly 3,300 volunteers who lend their time, talents and treasures to serve our families. We have a dedicated team who recruit, train and steward new congregations and volunteers.

The organization has a diverse fundraising strategy including: individual donors, tax credits, grant writing, events, and foundation and corporate support.

We also have an active Board of Directors who are also some of our largest donors.

Family Promise served 37 families with children from one site in 2000. In 2021, it served 170 families out of four sites.

The definition of "family" expanded in 2012 to include pets. All it took was seeing one family refuse shelter in order to not have to surrender their pet. The on-site pet sanctuary has since sheltered over 175 pets with their owners maintaining care and cleanup of their furry, feathery, or scaly family member.

Family Promise doubled its capacity in 2011 and opened a new Family Day Center in Glendale in early 2019. Headquarters moved to a second south Scottsdale facility later that year. This also opened up additional shelter space.

A fourth Family Day Center opened in Mesa late in 2020 with annual capacity for another 38 families. The Glendale Family Day Center moved to expand capacity in 2021. That free up its original space to pilot a shared housing program for shelter graduates. It will give families additional time to build savings while balancing light rent and a budget before transitioning to independent living.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Homeless families with children and families on the verge of homelessness

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Seeing that it is hard for shelter graduates to secure permanent housing -- due to low savings and the housing affordability market -- Family Promise opened the Promise House. It offers two families shared housing and case management for three months. It requires a small "rental" fee to help restore good tenancy habits. Deposit refunds and matching funds are available upon move out.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Clients have a very important role in providing insights about behavioral influences that impact their families. Our work is about understanding their challenges, history, stengths and opportunities to maximize their potential to return to self-sufficiency.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

FAMILY PROMISE-GREATER PHOENIX
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

FAMILY PROMISE-GREATER PHOENIX

Board of directors
as of 07/26/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Tim McGough

LPL Financial

Neil Sutton

Leader One Financial

Gabrielle Lawrence

Psychologiist

Phyllis Banucci

HR Professional - Retired

Michael Redivo

Clinical Psychologist

Tim McGough

LPL Financial

Chris Woodard

Valley Presbyterian Church

Don Henninger

SCOTT

Joanne Mizell

Banner/Aetna

Kevin Maxwell

State Farm

Tim Nichols

AZ Bank & Trust

Daniel Pike

Five Palms Consulting, LLC

Julie Cieniawski

Arizona Education Association

Tamara Shelman

AGIA Affinity

Jo Ellen McNamara

Larry Hewitrt

Genuine Parts Company

Jackie Johnson

City of Scottsdale

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/26/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/01/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.