TUCSON WILDLIFE CENTER

aka TWC   |   Tucson, AZ   |  www.tucsonwildlife.com

Mission

Tucson Wildlife Center is dedicated to the rescue, emergency medical care, rehabilitation and release of sick, injured and orphaned wildlife while promoting habitat protection and coexistence through education.

Notes from the nonprofit

We are also listed and reviewed on Best NonProfits Also a member of the Sonoran Desert Coalition which has 40 members including Sierra Club, Defenders of Wildlife, and Center for Biodiversity.

Ruling year info

2002

Executive Director

Ms. Lisa Bates

Main address

P O Box 18320

Tucson, AZ 85731 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

86-1001344

NTEE code info

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

Wildlife Sanctuary/Refuge (D34)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Southern Arizona has multitudes of different wildlife and currently, we are the only full-service wildlife hospital serving 8 counties. We respond to injured, ill, and orphaned wildlife by rescuing, rehabilitating and releasing back to their habitat whenever possible. The increasing loss of habitat and poisoning up the food chain through pesticides and herbicides are all cause for an increase in animals needing our services.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Wildlife Films

Volunteer Filmmaker, Marcus De Leon writes, directs and produces high quality, professional short films depicting wildlife rescues and releases, along with several public service announcements for Tucson Wildlife Center.

Population(s) Served

Tucson Wildlife Center's Education Coordinator, Angeline Fahey, provides vital information in her presentations regarding wild animal safety and coexistence. Tucson Wildlife Center offers educational outreach programs for community groups, schools, and events. Programs focus on our mission of rescue, rehab, and release, but are tailored to needs and interests. On-site educational tours are scheduled are offered October thru April and must be scheduled in advance.

Population(s) Served

Volunteers , animal care specialists and student interns in veterinary sciences and other treatment fields are offered training, shadowing and apprenticeship opportunities

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of free participants of guided tours

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of guided tours given

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This includes both on-site and off-site education programs

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Tucson Wildlife Center, founded in 1998, is the only wildlife hospital in Southern Arizona. The nonprofit center is dedicated to the rescue, emergency medical care and rehabilitation of sick, injured and orphaned wildlife before return to the wild while promoting education, habitat protection and peaceful coexistence with wildlife. TWC rescues wildlife big and small, from hummingbirds and hawks to baby bunnies and bobcats. TWC also offers educational programs to schools and community organizations.

We have education programs that reach out to the community through schools, clubs, and libraries, teaching the importance of peacefully coexisting with wildlife. We have been providing a series of educational books on wildlife to the local libraries through grants and donations, and we plan to branch out to the Tucson school districts.
We have rescuers that are trained to respond to injured wildlife calls, enabling us to treat them if needed here at our center. There is a constant influx of new volunteers and training provided.
We have enclosures for animals that have previously been imprinted or injured rendering them unable to survive in the wild.
There are two full-time wildlife veterinarians on staff and a Wildlife Rehabilitation Specialist who lives on-site as the center is open for emergency wildlife care 24/7, 365 days a year.

There are two full-time wildlife veterinarians on staff and a Wildlife Rehabilitation Specialist who lives on-site as the center is open for emergency wildlife care 24/7, 365 days a year. We have a full-time staff including an Education Coordinator, Grant Administrator, Development Associate, Accountant, Director, Associate Director, Animal Care Specialist, and Part-Time Volunteer Coordinator in addition to an army of 170 volunteers during our busy season and over 100 at any given time. Our emergency hospital has a full surgery, triage, laundry, kitchen, and Raptor ICU. We also have an additional songbird ICU and a separate building containing our busy season nursery. Our ambassador animals reside in ample space throughout our property. We have a rescue vehicle and two golf carts for transport on the property.

This year we have had over 3,000 animals come through the center so we are on track to have the most animals ever. We are looking to further develop our education program by bringing wildlife books to local libraries and schools, and by presenting to the Tucson Boys & Girls Clubs.

Financials

TUCSON WILDLIFE CENTER
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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TUCSON WILDLIFE CENTER

Board of directors
as of 9/11/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Lisa Bates

Tucson Wildlife Center

Edward Laber

Pete Lininger

Brad Sowers

Lisa Bates

Dr. William Follows

M.D.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes