Phoenix Rescue Mission

Transforming lives. Transforming the Valley.

aka Transforming Lives Center, Changing Lives Center, and Hope for Hunger Food Bank   |   Phoenix, AZ   |  phoenixrescuemission.org

Mission

We provide Christ-centered, life-transforming solutions to persons facing hunger, homelessness, addiction, and trauma.

Ruling year info

1960

CEO

Mr. Ken Brissa

Main address

1540 W Van Buren St

Phoenix, AZ 85007 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

86-6057771

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Christian (X20)

Alcohol, Drug and Substance Abuse, Dependency Prevention and Treatment (F20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Last year, almost 18,000 people in Maricopa County were homeless . . . 40% of them in families. The Phoenix Rescue Mission offers a number of Christ-centered programs and services to help men, women, and children escape hunger and homelessness.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Street Outreach

Service to the poor is the foundation upon which Phoenix Rescue Mission was built. Nearly every day of the year, the Mission’s Hope Coach vehicles travel the streets of the Valley, offering water, hygiene kits, socks, and other items to homeless men, women, and families without shelter. The Hope Coach is often the only help they receive. This vital program is important for reaching those on the streets with prayer, hope, and practical steps to get off the streets for good. Teams of case managers, interns, and volunteers canvass the Valley searching out men and women experiencing homelessness, hand out life-saving Hope Totes of water, hygiene items, and socks, and provide individualized care to remove the barriers that are keeping people stuck in a life on the streets.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

Phoenix Rescue Mission assists families and individuals throughout the community with basic needs every week. Food boxes, clothing, and disposable diapers are among the items given away to the poor. We operate the Hope for Hunger Food Bank in Glendale, AZ, which provides food, case management, and practical life skills to those in need in the city of Glendale. The ministry to working poor families also includes an annual Easter event, Back to School event, Thanksgiving food box giveaway and the Christmas Adopt-a-Family program. Phoenix Rescue Mission is there to help provide a solution, whenever possible, to those in need.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The Changing Lives Center provides long-term residential recovery programs for women and for women with children. Transformations is our total person recovery program for homeless, or near homeless women and women with children. It offers a blend of discipleship, recovery services, group therapy, and vocational and educational services. We house up to 180 women and children, whether battling addiction, escaping domestic violence, or suffering trauma. They live in a secure, apartment-style housing with access to childcare as they receive counseling, life skills education, and career assistance. It is the largest facility providing long-term residential recovery programming for women in Arizona.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Victims and oppressed people

The Transforming Lives Center (TLC) serves homeless men and men in poverty. Currently, it houses up to 360 men from life-controlling problems throughout various stages of recovery. The TLC offers both long-term, as well as short-term solutions. Clients participate in discipleship including class work, recovery meetings, work therapy, mentoring, group and individual counseling, and vocational development. This 12-month program consists of counseling, educational evaluation and advancement, Bible studies, and job search at the end of the program. Upon completion, the graduates have the tools to hold a job, re-entering society as a contributing member in the local community and church. The program focuses on healing the total person.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Men and boys

Every day, Hope for Hunger Food Bank, the largest food bank in Glendale, Arizona, provides emergency food and more for roughly 130 families in Glendale and parts of Phoenix and Peoria. The food bank is a true beacon of hope to the community — a place where caring volunteers come together as the hands and feet of Jesus — creating healthier, stronger futures and lives transformed.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Accreditations

Citygate Network 1964

Excellence in Giving - Certified Transparent 2020

Awards

Certification of Exellence 2014

Citygate Network

Affiliations & memberships

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability - Member 2000

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Homeless Street Outreach Rescues (placed in housing or services)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people

Related Program

Street Outreach

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2017 is a higher year because we still operated our emergency shelter, which did not require commitment to a solution-based program like our programs do now.

Non-Residential Food Boxes Distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Families

Related Program

Hope for Hunger Food Bank

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Non-Residential refers to food distributed to individuals and families not residing in our facilities as part of our addiction recovery programs. This focuses on our food bank and other food efforts.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1) Provide an excellent quality residential continuum of care that engages men, women, and families at their point of need, guides them through the recovery process, equips them for successful Christian living, and develops leaders to grow rescue and recovery ministry.

2) Build community engagement programs to mobilize volunteers and strategic partners to collaboratively develop and deliver high impact community-based solutions while leveraging our residential programs.

3) Develop program integrated social enterprise that generates revenue, provides vocational development for program clients, employment opportunities for qualified graduates, while leveraging collaborative partnerships.

4) Develop a high performance team and culture that align with strategic objectives and maximize the use of available time, talent, and treasures.

5) Achieve sustainable revenue growth through diversifying funding sources, increasing donor retention, and improving our stewardship and accountability to donors.

Financial
F1: Increase Topline Donor Revenue
F2: Increase Net Yield to Program
F3: Inc Operating Reserve to 90 days
F4: Eliminate Debt
F5: Financial Soundness

Clients / Services
S1: Reduce Hunger & Homelessness
IC1: Increase Touches
IC1: Increase Reach
IC2: Increase Rescue
IC3: Increase & Improve Recovery

Volunteers
IV1: Grow Volunteer Engagement
IV2: Grow High-Impact Partners
S3: "Raving Fans" Volunteers

Donors
S2: Pursue Donor Delight
ID2: Increase Second Gift Conversion
ID3: Improve Retention

The Phoenix Rescue Mission's capabilities are numerous, as would be expected for an organization providing services locally since 1952. However, the capabilities really can be "boiled down" to three critical assets:

Staff and Leadership: The Phoenix Rescue Mission currently has 100+ full-time employees / paid staff and over 2,500 part-time volunteer staff. Each paid staff person and each volunteer brings unique and vital contributions to the organization's overall capability to carry out its mission. The executive leadership team members, consisting of the chief executive officer, the chief development officer, and the chief program officer, bring decades of professional experience to their roles.

Donors: The Phoenix Rescue Mission's financial revenues and support come almost entirely from private contributions by individuals, churches, businesses and organizations. The organization is not reliant on government or public funds for its operating expenses. Currently over 34,000 households support the Phoenix Rescue Mission annually. The breadth and diversity of this support base is key to the capability of the organization to provide stable, high-quality and sustainable program services.

Board and Ambassadors: The Phoenix Rescue Mission's governing board of directors currently consists of 14 members, with a goal of growing to 22 members in the future. In addition, over 20 additional individuals serve as Ambassadors on behalf of the Phoenix Rescue Mission and actively provide volunteer leadership in different aspects of the organization's work.

We monitor progress against strategic goals through an established set of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). KPIs are establishing on a three-year rolling basis, and progress is monitored monthly against KPI peformance for that particular fiscal year. KPI performance is updated monthly during each specific fiscal year. KPI goals, and specific KPIs to be measured, are adjusted and updated in each annual planning cycle with specific goals / measures established for the upcoming fiscal year and the following two years after that, in order to maintain a three-year rolling plan.

KPIs include specific strategic objectives in the following categories: Financial; Clients; Volunteers and Donors.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Phoenix Rescue Mission serves people experiencing food insecurity, homelessness, substance use disorder, mental health challenges, and other life-controlling problems.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We're expanding our licensed childcare facility in response to feedback from mothers in the recovery program at the Changing Lives Center. Clients with active cases w/the Department of Child Safety (DCS) can only have their children watched by people who have received a background check and are approved by DCS. This forces clients to miss class time and counseling sessions when their children are unable to attend school for any reason, as the mothers must stay with their children 24/7. Expanding the childcare facility from 2 rooms to 5 and staffing it appropriately gives these mothers a DCS-approved option for their children, allowing them to attend class, counseling, and get a job. Furthermore, this enables the CLC to care for children up to age 12, instead of just up to age 5.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has given our clients legitimate influence over the activities and content of the programs instead of just concentrating this power with staff. Examples of this shift include the class schedule, chore assignments, roommate placements, counselor assignments, better ADA accommodations, and ensuring we have appropriate clothing on site for people of all shapes and sizes.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Phoenix Rescue Mission
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Phoenix Rescue Mission

Board of directors
as of 08/09/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ted Guy

Ted Guy & Associates

Term: 2022 - 2024

Jim Watkins

Principle, Lee & Associates

Kay Ekstrom

Retired

Brad Richardson

CEO, Legacy Gallery

Mary Kostrivas

Owner, ZDI LLC (Commercial Real Estate Development)

Chris Schoenleb

Retired Marketing CEO / Executive

Carl Johnson

Retired President & CEO, Mattrix

Ron Eriksson

Retired VP Dial Corporation

Tony Muller

Retired

Ted Guy

Ted Guy & Associates

Matthew Brinkman

Burns & McDonnell

Paul Reichert

Principal, AMS Health Clinic, LLC

Andy Warren

Retired, President Maracay Homes

Nathaniel Spatz

VP, Parkway Bank & Trust Company

Mary O'Hanlon

Retired Owner Barclay Communications

Amilyn Pierce

VP Government Affairs, AZ Diamondbacks

Kathy Murphy

Consultant, Kathryn Murphy & Assoc.

Paul Senseman

Policy Development Group

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/4/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data