Utah Food Bank

Fighting Hunger Statewide

Salt Lake City, UT   |  www.utahfoodbank.org

Mission

Founded in 1904, Utah Food Bank has operated under various names but remains true to its mission of Fighting Hunger Statewide by providing food to a statewide network of 216 emergency food pantries and agencies. Last fiscal year, Utah Food Bank distributed 70.2 million pounds of food and goods, the equivalent of approximately 58.5 million meals, to families and individuals in need.

Ruling year info

1959

President & CEO

Ms. Ginette Bott

Main address

3150 South 900 West

Salt Lake City, UT 84119 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Utah Food Bank Services

Community Services Council

Salt Lake Charity Association

EIN

87-0212453

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Everything about hunger hurts. For Utah’s children, hunger means struggling to focus—and learn—in school. It means not having the energy, health, or developmental ability to play with other children. It means taking on the worry and responsibility of adult life while you’re a child. It means carrying that hunger into adulthood, where you struggle against the increased likelihood of a broad range of mental and physical illnesses and unemployment. Hunger continues to hurt at every life stage. For seniors, hunger means significantly lower cognitive functioning and activity levels. It means feeling well less often and being sick—and hospitalized—more. It means losing your independence earlier than you should have. For all of us, hunger means billions of dollars in healthcare, lost wages, and education costs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency Food Assistance

Last year, Utah Food Bank distributed 70.2 million pounds of food, the equivalent of 58.5 million meals, via our statewide network of 216 partner agencies who reach Utahns facing hunger in each of Utah’s 29 counties. Because many of Utah Food Bank’s partners could not survive if they had to pay for the food they receive, Utah Food Bank is one of a handful of food banks in the country that distributes food free of charge.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Through this program, Utah Food Bank provides over 2,000 healthy evening meals each weekday for Utah children facing hunger. Clinical studies have found that children who experience inadequate nutrition are more likely to develop cognitive, physical, and social challenges than their better-fed counterparts. Meals are prepared on-site at Utah Food Bank by Kids Cafe kitchen staff, then immediately packed and transported to after-school sites where at least 50% of the children qualify for reduced-price or free lunches. Participating children receive Kids Cafe meals on weeknights, which often serve as their last meal of the evening. Last year, we distributed 405,215 Kids Cafe meals to children at 109 after-school and summer sites, including Boys & Girls Clubs, community centers and schools.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

CSFP makes food boxes available to seniors, pregnant women and small children living in metropolitan areas of Utah as well as outlying, more rural areas. This is a program of the United States Department of Agriculture that is administered by state government, in partnership with agencies like Utah Food Bank. This program offers approximately one week’s worth of non-perishable food, along with milk, bread and fresh produce when available, much of which is hand-delivered by caring volunteers. Last year, Utah Food Bank delivered 35,228 CSFP boxes to seniors and women in need.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

Utah Food Bank's food box program is designed to meet the needs of homebound seniors living in poverty and persons with disabilities, and offers additional opportunities that our CSFP program does not. We also deliver boxes to individuals and families quarantining because of COVID-19. These programs offer approximately one week’s worth of non-perishable food, along with milk, bread and fresh produce when available, much of which is hand-delivered by caring volunteers. For many recipients, this regular visit by a concerned volunteer is often one of the few visitors they receive, offering a bright spot in their difficult lives. Last year, Utah Food Bank distributed 24,051 UFB food boxes in addition to the 35,228 CSFP boxes for a total of 59,279 food boxes between the two programs. The seniors and people with disabilities that this program reaches often forego meals in order to pay prescription costs, utility bills and other expenses.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

Mobile Pantries provide additional support to individuals facing hunger with culturally suitable staples, including as much fresh food as available, in communities that are underserved by traditional brick-and-mortar pantries. Areas may be underserved because there is no local pantry, the local pantry is too small to store enough food to support the number of people in need, or the pantry lacks enough refrigeration to provide adequate fresh foods. Mobile Pantries also bring food to areas where clients lack sufficient transportation to access the nearest food pantry.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Alliances with local grocery retailers provide a donation outlet for food that is nearing its expiration date, but is still safe and healthy to eat. These donations primarily consist of perishable food items, including fresh produce, dairy and meats that would otherwise be thrown away. This process provides much needed nutritious food items while reducing food waste. Refrigerated trucks operate six days a week throughout the entire state, collecting this food from local retailers, which is then taken directly to partner agencies and is often in the hands of clients within 24 hours or less of pickup. Last year, this program’s partnerships with 288 grocery retailers across the state provided 19 million pounds of food for Utahns facing hunger, in addition to diverting wholesome food products from landfills.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The Mobile School Pantry program offers a cost-effective means of providing emergency food assistance to struggling families who might not otherwise seek help. It approaches childhood hunger in a more holistic way than other childhood hunger programs. The program began serving schools during the 2015-2016 school year where at least 50 percent of the students qualify for free or reduced-cost school lunches. Once each month (at a pre-determined date and time), Utah Food Bank’s Mobile School Pantry truck arrives at a designated place on school property. Participants are provided bags and move around the truck as volunteers offer them a choice of different food items. The amount of food distributed varies by family size and food availability. This program is free to participating schools’ student body and their families. Last year we served 60 schools with 500 distributions.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator

External assessments

Evaluated via the Impact Genome Project (2019)

Affiliations & memberships

Feeding America 2006

Better Business Bureau

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Utah Food Bank is the major hub for food collection and distribution in Utah, providing 43.3 million pounds of food across all 29 counties in Fiscal Year 2018 alone. We fight hunger through two primary routes: first by providing food to local agency partners and food pantries across the state, free of any charges or fees, to ensure that all Utahns have a local emergency food assistance partner if they need it. Second, we provide direct-service programs for school-aged children, families, seniors, and persons with disabilities. Utah Food Bank is the only organization committed to ensuring that every person facing hunger in Utah has access to emergency food assistance; that’s approximately 382,000 children, adults, and seniors throughout 84,899 square miles of challenging terrain.

To accomplish our goal of Fighting Hunger Statewide, last year alone we partnered with 150 food pantries and agency partners, provided food through programs in partnership with over 200 schools, libraries, after-school programs, and senior services, and traveled 479,224 miles last year alone. Unlike most food banks, and any food bank our size, we provide this service without fees of any kind to our partners.

We also fight hunger through direct service programs: Kids Cafe prepares and delivers nutritious meals to children in after-school programs; BackPack Program distributes child-friendly food packs to at-risk children to ensure hunger-free weekends; and the Mobile School Pantry program provides brick-and-mortar pantry services for students and their families right at their neighborhood school. The Food Box program delivers monthly supplemental food boxes to the homes of low-income seniors and people with disabilities, and our Mobile Pantry Program provides isolated, under-served communities with access to food pantries where none exist. Nearly all the food used in these programs comes from community food drives, commercial donations, and our Grocery Rescue Program, which picks up fresh food from retail food outlets and distributes it to local pantries. Last year alone, we distributed 43,298,602 pounds of food—the equivalent of nearly 36.1 million meals—to adults and children facing hunger throughout our state. Utah Food Bank depends heavily on volunteer support; last year, we benefited from 101,022 donated volunteer hours—the equivalent work of 49 full-time employees. Every dollar donated is leveraged into $7.84 of goods and services and only 4% of our budget went to administrative and fundraising costs.

Utah Food Bank’s approach to ensure sustainability of all programs over time is comprehensive and multifaceted. In order to continue delivery of services at the current standard, or to grow a program due to increased need, a variety of funding sources are required--corporate, government, foundation, and general public contributions. Utah Food Bank seeks funding for programs such as the Mobile School Pantry program through grant writing, direct mail campaigns, special events, and corporate sponsorship. The entire staff at Utah Food Bank, and more specifically the Development team, is dedicated and active in seeking support from this variety of sources.

Over the last three years, the number of individuals, foundations, corporations and government organizations that have made yearly gifts to Utah Food Bank is up by seven percent. This increased support has allowed Utah Food Bank to grow its programs while providing them with increased financial stability. With the continued support of Utah’s private and business communities and a carefully planned development approach, Utah Food Bank is confident of securing ample funds to support the future of its programs.

Utah Food Bank Fights Hunger Statewide by collecting, purchasing, and distributing food to hungry Utahns through 149 food pantries and agency partners. We also fight hunger through direct service programs: Kids Cafe prepares and delivers nutritious meals to children in after-school programs; BackPack Program distributes child-friendly food packs to at-risk children to ensure hunger-free weekends; and the Mobile School Pantry program provides brick-and-mortar pantry services for students and their families right at their neighborhood school. The Food Box program delivers monthly supplemental food boxes to the homes of low-income seniors and people with disabilities, and our Mobile Pantry Program provides isolated, under-served communities with access to food pantries where none exist. Nearly all the food used in these programs comes from community food drives, commercial donations, and our Grocery Rescue Program, which picks up fresh food from retail food outlets and distributes it to local pantries. Last year alone, we distributed 43,298,602 opunds of food—the equivalent of nearly 36.1 million meals—to adults and children facing hunger throughout our state. Utah Food Bank depends heavily on volunteer support; last year, we benefited from 101,022 donated volunteer hours—the equivalent work of 49 full-time employees. Every dollar donated is leveraged into $7.84 of goods and services and only 4% of our budget went to administrative and fundraising costs.

Financials

Utah Food Bank
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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Utah Food Bank

Board of directors
as of 01/25/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Zach England

CR England

Term: 2022 - 2021

Michael Anglin

UPS

Ron Jorgensen

Questar Pipeline Company

Katelyn Thompson

University of Utah Health Care

Linda Ashton

Abacus Investments

Shaysee Dennis

Sallie Mae Bank

Don Ipson

DATS Trucking/Utah State Senate

Genevieve Spackman

O. C. Tanner Company

Howard Stoker

EY

Zach England

CR England

Rick Foster

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Jarrod Hunt

Colliers International

Mark Ludwig

Sorenson Capital

Aubriana Martindale

Smith's Food and Drug

Mat Thomas

Walmart

Nathan Wilkey

3M Health Care

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/25/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability