YMCA of Northern Utah

For Youth Development. For Healthy Living. For Social Responsibility.

Salt Lake City, UT   |  www.ymcautah.org

Mission

To provide our communities with experiences that enhance healthy mind, body and spirit in which we strive to build strong kids, strong families, and strong communities.

Ruling year info

1959

CEO

Rich West

Main address

675 East 2100 South Suite 200

Salt Lake City, UT 84106 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

87-0212472

NTEE code info

YMCA, YWCA, YWHA, YMHA (P27)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Recreational and Sporting Camps (Day, Overnight, etc.) (N20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our mission is to provide our communities with experiences that enhance healthy mind, body, and spirit while building strong kids, strong families, and strong communities. Our vision is to be the leader in understanding and meeting our communities’ needs by creating and adapting quality programs and experiences that provide value to children, adults, and families.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Youth Development Programs

The YMCA serves all people, regardless of their ability to pay, with programs that develop the spirit, mind, and body. YMCA provides traditional daycare, an afterschool enrichment program, and day camp activities. YMCA also offers programs designed to develop the spirit, mind, and body through cardiovascular and muscular activity.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers

The YMCA Afterschool Program helps youth succeed academically, learn positive values and behaviors, explore new talents, and discover their full potential. At all of our program sites, the daily schedule includes at least 30 minutes of personalized academic support, at least 30 minutes of physical activity, a healthy snack or meal, and a variety of enrichment clubs that provide new learning opportunities and experiences for youth. Youth will also participate in at least clubs each day based on their individual interests and needs. We use the Project Based Learning (PBL) model from You for Youth in our Afterschool programs. PBL is shown to engage critical thinking skills, which in turn shows positive growth in social-emotional competencies. Our staff looks at several factors including grades, social-emotional development needs based on results from the DESSA (a nationally-recognized social-emotional development measurement tool) and needs and interests of youth when planning and designing clubs. We also encourage youth to design and lead clubs. Our program model addresses the academic achievement gap through a sequenced, active, focused and explicit (S.A.F.E.) framework which research has shown is associated with: 1) significant improvements in self-perceptions, school bonding, and positive social behaviors; 2) significant reductions in conduct problems and drug use; and 3) significant increases in test scores, grades, and school attendance.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

The YMCA overnight camps, Camp Roger and Camp Mill Hollow, have introduced thousands of children and teens to Utah’s amazing mountain landscape while engaging them in wilderness exploration and adventures, environmental stewardship, and leadership development. While away from the routine back home, youth have the chance to develop confidence and independence by taking on new responsibilities and challenges. Activities at Camp teach youth to live in a community, build self-esteem, and make lasting friendships. Our goal is to help kids stay active in mind and body during critical summer months. Through the week, campers participate in a range of activities that vary between the two camps and include: archery, arts and crafts, mountain biking, outdoor education, orienteering, horseback riding, leadership training, and more. Camp Roger has been in operation for over 65 years. Camp Roger operates weekly camp programs starting in June and concluding in August. Camp Mill Hollow has been in operation by Granite School District for nearly 55 years. The YMCA of Northern Utah took over operations of Camp Mill Hollow in 2017 and we are excited to continue growing Camp Mill Hollow in the years to come. Camp Mill Hollow operates weekly camp programs starting in June and concluding in August.

Camp gives kids the opportunity to learn, to belong, unplug, and connect. At Camp, kids learn about acceptance and tolerance. They stay with their cabin mates, share stories and life lessons, and learn to appreciate others for who they are. Camp is a place where kids feel they belong. Kids’ lives are filled with distractions like video games, social media, and TV. Camp gives kids the much-needed chance to disconnect from the technological world and re-learn how to connect face-to-face. We also teach kids how to make new friends and provide positive staff role models to help them be successful at Camp and connect with others. The “cabin group” structure gives kids an identity at Camp that helps them fit in and Camp staff work extremely hard to help kids connect with each other, make new friends, and form positive bonds with the staff.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

The YMCA's Summer Day Camp is a fun and unique experience that gives children and teens the opportunity to discover their full potential, play, meet new friends and create memories that last a lifetime. Y Camp is all about learning outside of school, exploring and appreciating the outdoors, developing new skills, making friends and showing leadership. Youth have a chance to develop confidence and independence by taking on new responsibilities and challenges.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of grants and research funding awarded to the institution

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Youth Development Programs

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

2018 -2019, there was a shift in the way that the state handed out some grants - instead of contracts to individual sites, they consolidated the application under one contract.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Related Program

Youth Development Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of links and collaborations with external organizations that support student learning and its priority tasks

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Parents

Related Program

Youth Development Programs

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Family relationships

Related Program

Youth Development Programs

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We are dedicated to the values of caring, honesty, respect, and responsibility in which ALL are welcome with an engaging, stimulating, and secure environment, which results in meaningful and rewarding work experience for our staff.

The YMCA’s unique approach rests on four organizational pillars:

I. The YMCA’s vision, mission, and values come alive not by whom we serve, but by how we serve them. The Y’s staff members strive to give the best of their abilities. Our well-trained and caring staff intentionally builds relationships with each person in our programs, which fosters friendships and exemplifies our core values. We value the approach of integrating “spirit” into everything we do, which allows us to have a stronger impact and meaningful results in each action.

II. The Y’s inclusiveness extends to all in which we strive to provide value to and serve everyone in the community despite socio-economic status, race, religion, age, gender, background, ability. We take pride in providing financial assistance for fee-based programs. This ensures that all youth, adults, and families can access a safe environment with high quality, enriching programs.

III. Best practices are purposely put to work to ensure that each program and curriculum component develops the whole person (socially, emotionally, physically, and academically).

IV. Utilizing a framework of evidence-based research and current community needs assessments allows the Y to not only customize programs and services that meet the needs of a particular individual and/or community, but allows us to put first-rate knowledge to work in the communities that need us most.

Today’s YMCA of Northern Utah was incorporated as a non-profit organization in 1946, but originally began in Salt Lake City in 1893. The Y is dedicated to building healthy, confidence, connected, and secure children, adults, families, and communities. The Y continually looks to provide value, to stay relevant, and to serve communities in the ways they need most. We offer programs, services, and initiatives focused on youth development, healthy living, and social responsibility, according to the unique needs of the communities we engage. Through School Year programs, Summer Camps, and community, adult, and family programs, services and events, we instill our values of caring, honesty, respect, and responsibility, and accomplish our vision and mission.

The YMCA will always be dedicated to building healthy, confidence, connected, and secure children, adults, families, and communities. Our focus is based upon continually looking to provide value, to stay relevant, and to serve communities in the ways they need most. Everything the Y does is in service of building a better youth, family, and community because we believe that every person and community deserves a chance to thrive. The Y offers programs, services, and initiatives focused on youth development, healthy living, and social responsibility, according to the unique needs of the communities we engage. Through school year programs, summer camps, and community engagement we instill the Y’s values of caring, honesty, respect, and responsibility, and accomplish our vision and mission.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

YMCA of Northern Utah
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

YMCA of Northern Utah

Board of directors
as of 10/26/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Andrea Barlow

Herman Miller

Term: 2020 -

Andrea Barlow

Herman Miller

Mark Adams

Ogden Regional Medical Center

Aaron Austad

The Boyer Company

John Davis

Retired (Holland & Hart)

Brady Fosmark

Bank of Utah

Patrick Green

Retired (Chevron)

Dr. Margit Lister

Intermountain Healthcare

Dennis Lloyd

Workers Compensation Fund

David Malone

Weber State University

Scott Parkinson

Retired (Bank of Utah)

Jessica Taylor

University of Utah

Jordan White

Public Service Commission of Utah

Teri Cooper

American Express

Jennifer Rigby

Cognizant Technology Solutions

Ryan Hammerschmidt

Method Studio Inc.

Tom Sayasith

Mountain American Credit Union

Colleen Bell

Retired (Dominion Energy)

Mike McMenomy

CBRE Global Investors

Eric White

GSBS Architects

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/28/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/28/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.