Utah Humanities Council

Ideas in Action

aka Utah Humanities   |   Salt Lake City, UT   |  www.utahhumanities.org

Mission

We empower individuals and groups in Utah to improve their communities through active engagement in the humanities.

Ruling year info

1988

Executive Director

Jodi Graham

Main address

202 West 300 North

Salt Lake City, UT 84103 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

87-0307076

NTEE code info

Humanities Organizations (A70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Utah Humanities aims to improve Utah communities through the humanities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Center for the Book ~ Annual Book Festival and Monthly Programming

The Center for the Book supports programs that foster a love of reading and of books as well as the exploration of contemporary issues through literature.

The Center focuses on the following programs:

*Utah Humanities Book Festival ~ A statewide celebration during National Book Month (October). The annual Book Festival is Utah’s oldest and only statewide book festival and has become Utah’s signature literary event. Each year, the festival is a chance for book lovers of all types to enjoy some great, free-of-charge literary events at locations throughout Utah.

* Monthly Programming ~ A collaborative effort with libraries, schools, and community organizations around the state to host all kinds of literary programming. From authors and editors, to book artists and illustrators, we want to examine books and publishing from all angles.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Center for Community Heritage encourages Utahns to explore, preserve, and share their unique local history, culture, and traditions.

The Center focuses on the following programs:

* Museum on Main Street Traveling Exhibitions ~ A partnership with the Smithsonian Institution’s Museum on Main Street (MoMS) traveling exhibition service to bring their content together with UH resources to serve cultural organizations and residents in Utah’s underserved areas through community-based programming. The national exhibition is complemented by local exhibits tying Utah stories to the larger theme, school-based and public programming created by host communities, as well as broader multimedia content produced by UH and its partners.

* Heritage Workshops ~ Offers assistance for Utah’s museums and cultural organizations to be robust stewards and proponents of their important community heritage. The aim is to strengthen the fabric of Utah’s collective heritage by supporting the sector of small organizations that are - in large part - responsible for sustaining it. These free regional workshops provide hands-on training in best practice history research, collection stewardship, exhibition development, and interpretation techniques. Onsite mentored projects give participants the opportunity to apply their new knowledge and skills.

* Beehive Archive ~ Our award-winning radio program that provides a two-minute look at some of the most pivotal—and peculiar—events in Utah history! Its three main goals: (1) to educate Utahns about the state's complex history and encourage them to think more critically about that history; (2) provide an opportunity for communities to discover and share their stories about people, events, and ideas from Utah's past, and 3) disseminate this information widely through radio broadcast, newspapers, streaming, and iTunes.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Center for Educational Access supports programs that use the humanities to expand educational opportunities for underserved people of all ages.

The Center focuses on the following programs:

* Clemente Course ~ An accredited interdisciplinary humanities course for underserved 10th and 11th grade students at East High in Salt Lake City. Made possible through partnerships with the University of Utah's Honors College, Westminster College's Honors Program, faculty from East High, and University Neighborhood Partners.

The course taught by college faculty is intellectually rigorous, focusing on significant multicultural works using primary documents, group discussion, writing, and group projects as the basis for learning, and is consistent with Utah’s new Common Core curriculum.

* Venture Course ~ A free, accredited interdisciplinary humanities course offered to adults "of modest means who dare to dream.” Made possible through partnerships with Weber State University in Ogden, Westminster College in the City of South Salt Lake, and Southern Utah University in Cedar City, Venture introduces students living on low incomes to philosophy, art history, literature, American history, and critical writing/thinking.

This evening course is taught by college faculty and gives students new ways of thinking about their lives and their world, developing their ability to think critically and empowering them to take more control of their future. Using discussion and writing to learn and primary sources as texts, Venture uses the liberal arts to help liberate the mind.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The Center for Local Initiatives supports grassroots humanities projects throughout the state of Utah. Communities identify important issues and use the humanities to address them.

The Center offers the following program and grant opportunities:

* Community Conversations ~ This program empowers local residents to bring together key players to identify the issues most important to them, and to discuss them through a humanities lens.

* Competitive Grants ~ Grants of up to $5,000 are awarded once a year for large-scale public humanities projects around the state. These projects demonstrate a wide variety of humanities disciplines and formats and address important community issues.

* Oral History Grants ~ Grants of $2,000 are awarded for the collection and transcription of oral histories in Utah. Transcripts and recordings are deposited at the Utah State Historical Society Library and other deposition sites (such as local libraries), and the content of the collected oral histories is made available to the general public through a live public program. These grants are offered in partnership with the Utah Department of State History, and are awarded quarterly.

* Quick Grants ~ A simplified and expedited application process for smaller public humanities projects, up to $1,500. Successful applications address a community issue and actively engage audiences with humanities topics and themes. Quick Grants may also be used for humanities scholars to assist in planning projects and/or preparing a competitive grant application (max $500). Awards are made on a rolling basis, and applications must be received 8 weeks prior to the start of the project.

*Research Fellowships ~ The Albert J. Colton Fellowship for Projects of National or International Scope and the Delmont R. Oswald Fellowship for Utah Studies—provide financial support for scholars doing research or applied projects in the humanities. The $3,500 fellowships are made possible by endowment funds established in memory of Albert J. Colton, a former UH board member, and Delmont R. Oswald, UH's founding director. Applications are reviewed and awarded annually.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

The Schwartz Prize 2014

Federation of State Humanities Councils

National Humanities Medal 2015

President Barack Obama/White House

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average grant amount

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average number of dollars given by new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We believe that the humanities can affect society and improve lives. To meet our mission, we partner with individuals and groups who want to put humanities ideas into actions that have a positive impact on their communities. UH's programs and services provide opportunities for open discussions of important community issues, build capacity among cultural and educational organizations, and provide seed money for local initiatives.

An important goal of Utah Humanities is that all Utahns come to understand and appreciate the value of the humanities in daily life. To achieve this, we are committed to creating communities in which the meaning of the humanities is explored; to serving all Utahns, particularly those not traditionally served by other cultural and educational institutions; to achieving broad citizen participation; to fostering a humanities network linking scholars and organizations; and to advocating for the humanities among policymakers and the public. We respond to a diversity of needs through program delivery, grants, advisory support, and dissemination of information.

To ensure success with our programs, we partner and collaborate with many types of organizations: libraries, historical societies, museums, schools and colleges, civic and service organizations, public radio and television stations, local and state government agencies, arts and humanities councils, ad hoc groups, and others.

• Prioritize resources to maintain and grow the core programs that are yielding the strongest results in accomplishing our mission of enriching the lives of Utahns through thought-provoking opportunities to explore and engage with the humanities.

• Continue to build and increase our development efforts.

• Increase awareness of Utah Humanities and its programs among current partners and underserved audiences.

• Maintain organization continuity plans, policy & procedures manuals, technology capabilities, and responsible fiscal management.


• Annually evaluate program impact and areas of need.

For 43 years, we have a solid track record and sterling reputation as a leader in Utah's cultural and educational sectors. UH has strong support from both private and public sectors. Current and former board members represent all areas of the state and diverse professional backgrounds.

Utah Humanities has a talented and dedicated board and staff and a broad network of relationships with cultural, educational, and civic institutions and people throughout the state.

Utah Humanities has a forty three year track record of serving geographic, ethnic, professional, and other communities throughout the state. We see our organization evolving over the next three to five years toward a more focused version of what it is today, demonstrating real and lasting community impact.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    UH programs aim to engage people of all ages, religions, cultures, genders, disabilities, and socio-economic backgrounds. We focus efforts to increase attendance with Utah’s minority, youth, and rural populations with the help of our partners. We collaborate and partner with organizations that help us plan and implement diverse cultural activities that allow our programs to grow and reach a variety of targeted audiences across the state,

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Utah Humanities Council
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Utah Humanities Council

Board of directors
as of 4/29/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Janice Brooks

Owner, JBS Unlimited

Term: 2021 - 2020


Board co-chair

Phyllis Hockett

Co-Founder, Pathway Associates

Term: 2020 - 2021

Sumiko Martinez

U of U College of Nursing

Phyllis Hockett

Pathway Associates

Janice Brooks

JBS Unlimited

Julie Hartley

Utah State University

Randy Williams

Utah State University

Simon Cantarero

Boart Longyear

Joni Crane

Vernal City

Don Gomes

Entrada Institute

Matthew Lawyer

Cove Bio

Don Montoya

Retired BLM

Danielle Dubrasky

English Professor, SUU

Christopher Gonzalez

English Professor, Utah State Univ.

Inoke Hafoka

Ph. D Candidate, UCLA

Kathryn MacKay

History Professor, Weber State Univ.

Barry Scholl

Attorney, Richards Brandt Miller Nelson

Erica Walz

Owner/Publisher, The Wayne & Garfield County Insider

Paul Winward

CPA & Audit Partner, Squire

Ronee Wopsock Pawwinnee

Education Director/Superindependent, Uintah River HS

Ze Min Xiao

Director, Mayor's Office of New Americans

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/08/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/08/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.