GREAT OLD BROADS FOR WILDERNESS

aka Broads   |   Durango, CO   |  http://www.greatoldbroads.org

Mission

Great Old Broads for Wilderness is a national grassroots organization, led by women, that engages activism to preserve and protect wilderness and wild lands.

Ruling year info

1998

Executive Director

Ms. Shelley Silbert

Main address

555 Rivergate Ln B1-110

Durango, CO 81301 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

87-0479828

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

Land Resources Conservation (C34)

Energy Resources Conservation and Development (C35)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Working Towards Wilderness Designation. Broads collaborate with conservation partners to urge Congress to designate new Wilderness areas. We are not afraid to challenge when conservation vision falls short. We also monitor management of areas already designated as Wilderness to ensure these places remain an enduring legacy of wilderness, “untrammeled by man".

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Wilderness Advocacy and Education

As a grassroots organization, Broads relies on its membership, partner organizations, and citizen activism to protect valuable ecosystems, natural landscapes, and vibrant wildlife habitats. Through advocacy and collaboration, Broads:
• Offers leadership training to its membership to advocate for natural resource protection issues in their local communities;
• Provides training to document concerns and problems on public lands using photos and data collection;
• Connects people with on-the-ground actions via service projects, exploratory hikes, and inventory of wilderness characteristics;
• Assesses the threat of habitat loss and ecosystem damage from unmanaged recreation, abuse of natural resources, and invasive species;
• Increases awareness of the value of solitude and open space;
• Contributes resources and strengths for proactive solutions with other conservation advocates.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Grassroots Leadership Program trains, guides, and supports our 40+ local chapters, called Broadbands. Broadbands are member run regional or local chapters across the country formed around Broads’ mission to preserve and protect Wilderness and wild lands.
These chapters, led by volunteer leaders and co-leader teams, are made up of passionate and dedicated Broads and Bros of diverse backgrounds and ages, with a fire for change and a love for the land. Focused on education, advocacy, outreach, and collaborative stewardship projects—humor and joy play a fundamental role in our work. Broadband members share stories, experiences, and passions; creating deep connections to each other and the earth that lead to stronger Broadbands and stronger advocacy.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Activists

Where we work

Awards

Global Environmental Challenge Award 2017

Walden Woods Project

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Great Old Broads for Wilderness is a national grassroots organization, led by women, that engages and inspires activism to preserve and protect wilderness and wild lands. Conceived by older women who love wilderness, Broads gives voice to the millions of Americans who want to protect their public lands as Wilderness for this and future generations. We bring knowledge, commitment, and humor to the movement to protect our last wild places on earth.Great Old Broads for Wilderness advocates for protection of these places and sensible management that protects their wild character and values. Our actions are guided by what is best for the land; what is best for Mother Earth.

Broads works with decision makers to ensure wild public lands stay wild while awaiting Wilderness designation or other protective measures.

This includes Wilderness Study Areas and Inventoried Roadless Areas identified as eligible for protection, as well as the millions of acres that citizens have inventoried and identified as having wilderness character that have not yet been endorsed for protection.

Broads always have something going on. Our national Broadwalks and Broadworks are scheduled spring through fall. Regional Broadband 'Walks & 'Works happen pretty much year round. Local Broadband activities including day hikes, stewardship projects, films, lectures, advocacy activities, and more. Broadwalks are events where attendees get to know the landscape and learn about protection issues specific to where the Broadwalk is held. There's plenty of on-the-ground exploration and discussion with folks who know the place and the concerns. This gives attendees first-hand experience so they have a better understanding of why these landscapes warrant protection. Broadwork events are stewardship-focused projects coordinated with partner organizations and land managers. Activities range from training and botanic field observations and monitoring of land health to all-out river restorations and invasive plant removal. No experience is necessary. Broads and Bros are trained and schooled in the “whats" and “whys" behind the Broadwork activity. Conversations and learning continue throughout the week. Employees at our national office in Durango, CO, along with our amazing local volunteer Broadband leaders of chapters throughout the U.S. afford us the infrastructure to advocate and help preserve our wild wilderness' and public lands.

Our core competencies include engaging volunteers in on-the-ground action and collaborating with other organizations in pursuit of protection for our wild public lands. Through advocacy and technology Broads is always extending its capacity to effect change by expanding partnerships and technology of the Healthy Lands Project and providing resources and leadership training to Broadbands, our name for local chapters. A "sample" of some of the accomplishments by Great Old Broads include:
• Broadening of Broads' leadership and organizational capacity with Broadband Boot Camp, development of nearly 40 chapters in 15 states, national media interest, and communication technology;
• Expansion of Healthy Lands Project, an innovative program and resource documenting land health conditions used by partners and public, easily accessible and available 24/7 on the internet; and
• Recapture, Utah! Campaign – Broads' diligence and hard-working volunteers resulted in closures to motorized vehicles on illegally constructed trails outside of Blanding, Utah, where canyons rich in archaeology and biodiversity have been subjected to vandalism and resource damage. Recapture Utah! work includes active participation in livestock grazing collaborations in San Juan and Beaver Counties in southern Utah.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Americans who wish to preserve and protect wilderness and wild public lands and waters for future generation.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    One of our annual activities is to survey our volunteer Broadband chapter leaders to find out where we can provide additional training and guidance. We have developed several trainings based on this feedback including seminars on lobbying, building diversity and inclusion, the National Environmental Policy Act, and our litigation process.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our organization has become more responsive to our constituents' educational needs--what they want to learn more about, updates on issues, and how to take action as activists.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

GREAT OLD BROADS FOR WILDERNESS
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

GREAT OLD BROADS FOR WILDERNESS

Board of directors
as of 4/13/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Rynda Clark


Board co-chair

Micky Ryan

Pip Coe

Suez Jacobson

Antonia Daly

Mary O'Brien

Anne Heikkila

Rynda Clark

Micky Ryan

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/15/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data