Adopt-A-Native-Elder

Salt Lake City, UT   |  http://www.anelder.org

Mission

Adopt-A-Native-Elder (ANE) program exists to create a bridge of hope between Native Americans and other cultures. It allows us to reach out to one another, share our gifts, and mend the broken circle of our relationship with the Land and the Native Americans who hold it in sacred trust. The Adopt-A-Native-Elder Program is a trusted humanitarian organization focused on delivering food, medical supplies, yarn for weaving, firewood, and food certificates to Elders living in poverty on the Navajo Reservation. Respecting the tradition and dignity of the Navajo Elders, we reach out to learn the culture, create relationships, and honor and serve the Elders.

Ruling year info

1993

Executive Director

Ms. Linda A. Myers

Assistant Director

CJ Robb

Main address

328 W Gregson Ave

Salt Lake City, UT 84115 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

87-0490211

NTEE code info

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Cultural, Ethnic Awareness (A23)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food Runs to 11 remote locations

Twice a year, 100,000 pounds of food and supplies are delivered to the Elders age 75+ on the Navajo reservation. Each Elder receives 2 boxes of food, flour, and fresh produce. Medical items are available for Elders needing incontinent supplies, mobility equipment, safety equipment, and general medical supplies. Elders may receive medical boxes, basic supplies such as hygiene and cleaning, clothing, firewood, and yarn.

Population(s) Served

Each spring and fall The Adopt-A-Native-Program delivers boxes of food, simple medicines, clothing, household items, bottled water, fresh produce, and yarn to Elders living in four areas of the Navajo reservation.

We typically deliver roughly 400,000 pounds of assistance to Elders in need, an amount that equals the capacity of seven semi-trucks to the Elders every Food Run. Most of the Elders are in their late 80’s to over 100 years of age and the food is much needed assistance.

These boxes are delivered to the Elders each spring and fall by volunteers who provide their own vehicles, gasoline and travel expenses to be of service to the Elders.

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples
Seniors
Economically disadvantaged people

The Elders need help beyond the twice a year food deliveries. The food certificates give the Elders the opportunity to purchase healthy food for management of diabetes and other illnesses. The certificates can be sent year round and are as donations allow.
Firewood is needed for heating and cooking in many remote locations. Elders need 10-14 loads of wood through a winter at about 150$ per load. This vital means of support helps the Elder endure long winters.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

4-star top rating for sound fiscal management 2021

Charity Navigator

Affiliations & memberships

CNN Hero 2017

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Adopt-A-Native-Elder (A.N.E.) incorporated in 1991 to take food to traditional Elders living below the poverty line in remote areas of the Navajo Reservation in Utah and Arizona.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    We communicate with Navajo Senior Coordinators regularly via phone and texts throughout the year.,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The economic and health impact due to the pandemic has caused much suffering throughout the Navajo Nation. Adopt-A-Native-Elder expanded program support to include the mailing of firewood vouchers and food assistance to 250 Elders not currently in the program. Additionally, the Board of Directors approved the establishment of an Emergency Fund to help families cover unexpected expenses such as funeral costs.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our relationship with the Navajo Elders we serve is based on trust. Throughout the years, Adopt-A-Native-Elder has increased this relationship of trust through listening and enacting program initiatives that best serve the Elders to the fullest of our capacity.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Adopt-A-Native-Elder
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Adopt-A-Native-Elder

Board of directors
as of 02/25/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

John Burrow

Sr. VP Manulife Financial

John Burrow

Sr V P Manulife Financial

Rodger Wiiliams

Indian Child Welfare ACt

Linda Myers

ANE

Shirley Silversmith

Retired Director, UT Division of Indian Affairs

Eileen Quintana

Program Manager, Indian Education

Doug Hollinger

Former President, Park City Clothing Co.

Anthony Morgan

Retired Professor Emeritus U of UT, retired

Mary Robertson Begay

Hardrock Council On Substance Abuse, Inc.

Judy O'Day

President Terra Diamond, Retired

CJ Robb

ANE

Jesselie Anderson

Calvin Norton

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/25/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/24/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.