Community Action Services And Food Bank Inc

aka Community Action Services   |   Provo, UT   |  communityactionuc.org

Mission

Community Action Services and Food Bank works to stabilize families and then rebuild their lives. We help meet their basic needs (food, shelter, housing) while providing the long-term solutions needed to rebuild their financial and social self sufficiency, enabling them to break out of poverty.
Vision Statement:
We envision vibrant, sustainable communities throughout Utah, Wasatch and Summit Counties where everyone has
• Safe and affordable housing;
• Adequate economic opportunities; and
• People in their life they can count on.

Ruling year info

1992

Executive Director

Ms. Karen McCandless

Main address

815 South Freedom Blvd., #100

Provo, UT 84601 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

87-0491952

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (S01)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Since 1967, Community Action Services and Food Bank (CASFB) has been working to eliminate poverty in Utah, Summit, and Wasatch counties, Utah. CASFB recognizes poverty can be situational (caused by job loss, death, divorce, domestic violence, etc.) or inter-generational (two or more generations have lived in poverty).

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Action Food Bank

Community Action Food Bank alleviates hunger by providing food/basic needs packages, counseling, budgeting and referrals to other community services.  Community Action Food Bank operates six food pantries and provides food and other items to 26+ other community organizations including the local soup kitchen, spouse abuse center, senior centers, Boys and Girls Club, small church food pantries and many others.  The stated food bank budget includes the value of the donated food which is almost $9 million).  The cash budget was $752,751 in FY 2013.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The Family Development Program empowers families and individuals to become more self-reliant by providing short-term assistance and long-term support and case management to help families to meet goals unique to their own situation.  Services may include shelter, emergency rent help, food help, utility assistance, negotiation with landlords, hygiene items and more.  The Program stabilized 750 homeless or at-risk homeless families and individuals in 2013 and helped more than 6,500 families with food assistance.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The Home Buyer and Mortgage Counseling Program provides a full range of housing counseling services including: foreclosure prevention, reverse mortgage, pre-purchase, first time home buyer education, post-purchase, refinance, and predatory lending counseling.  The goal of the program is to promote stable home ownership through first time home buyer education and through the variety of mortgage counseling services.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The Circles® Initiative is a transformational approach that partners volunteers and community leaders with families wanting to make the journey out of poverty. Operating in communities around the country, each Circles® initiative consists of families working to get out of poverty and several middle and upper income Allies who befriend them and lend support. The family is the Circle Leader, setting direction for activities. With the help and friendship of their allies, each family sets and achieves goals unique to their own needs.
Rather than targeting a surface need of at-risk communities such as housing or food provision, Circles® seeks to expand social capital by fostering relationships across racial and economic lines. It engages the community as a whole and encourages growth from people of all financial classes. Circles® is designed to assist families in creating their own personal paths out of poverty while at the same time expanding opportunities, connections and eliminating barriers in the community that make it difficult for families to thrive.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Low-income people who are starting or growing their own food preparation business use our commercial kitchen to prepare their foods for sale.  Over the last couple of years more than 60 people have become employed through the food businesses utilizing the commercial kitchen.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Established in 1967, Community Action Services and Food Bank (CASFB) works to build self-reliance in individuals, families, and communities in Utah, Summit, and Wasatch Counties. It accomplishes this through a variety of means, including direct-service programs such as home buyer mortgage counseling and food distribution. It also works to remove barriers to self-reliance and is implementing a community strategies effort to develop long-term, innovative, and permanent solutions to issues contributing to poverty. By working through both direct-service and system-changing means, CASFB intends to achieve its vision of vibrant, sustainable communities throughout its service area where everyone has safe and affordable housing, adequate employment, and people in their lives they can count on.
We help meet their basic needs (food, shelter, housing) while providing the long-term solutions needed to rebuild their financial and social self sufficiency, enabling them to break out of poverty. Our five year strategic goal is to move 1,000 families out of poverty and stabilize thousands more. We will do this by growing our legacy (core) programs; diversifying and building financial resources; and engaging volunteers, donors, and community leaders as advocates in ending poverty.

Our five year strategic goal is to move 1,000 families out of poverty and stabilize thousands more. We will do this by growing our legacy (core) programs; diversifying and building financial resources; and engaging volunteers, donors, and community leaders as advocates in ending poverty.
Our specific program strategies are to alleviate hunger through the Food Bank, stabilize homeless and at risk homeless families and individuals in affordable housing through the Family Development Program; help families become homeowners and prevent foreclosures through our Home Buyer and Mortgage Counseling Program; help families from generational poverty to move out of poverty through the Circles Initiative; grow food businesses and create jobs through the commercial kitchen; and help families to grow their own produce through the community gardens.
Our specific core objectives are:
• Community Action is a client-centered organization;
• Community Action’s internal processes are effective, efficient, and client-centered;
• Community Action’s human capital is exceptional;
• Community Action becomes more financially secure; and
• Community Action’s donors and volunteers are champions of the vision.

Community Action has a highly trained and experienced staff and thousands of volunteers who work together in support of our mission to address poverty in our communities. We have adopted a five year strategic plan which describes our commitment to execute goals, strategies and tactics in order to improve our services and outcomes.
These targets include the following:
We are a client-centered organization;
We have internal processes are effective, efficient, and client-centered;
Our human capital is exceptional;
We will become more financially secure through diversification of funding and support; and
Our donors and volunteers are champions of the vision.

The following describes our progress in meeting our objectives in our strategic plan:
1. Being a client-centered organization. We have instituted an immediate feedback system which allows clients to complete a simple electronic survey which indicates their level of satisfaction with our services and how they are treated. We have found that 90% of those surveyed report that they are satisfied with services and feel respected.
2. Internal processes are effective, efficient, and client-centered. We have begun the process to regularly assess program and service processes and will make improvements as needed. We have changed the way we serve people in our food pantries - families now choose the food items they most need rather than receiving a pre-made food order. This approach is client choice.
3. Human capital is exceptional. We have instituted a more formal process for recruiting, and training highly qualified persons.
4. We become more financially secure. We have instituted a more formal process for engaging and informing donors about the outcomes of our services and the difference they are making. We have recruited community members to assist us in identifying and engaging additional potential private and corporate foundations.
5. Donors and volunteers are champions of our vision. We have increased our efforts to recruit more consistent community volunteers. We have established regular tours and events to engage existing and potential donors.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The vast majority of those who benefit from our mission are below 100% of the Federal Poverty Level. We also serve the community at-large with: 1. Poverty related workshops. 2. Financial learning training. 3. Commercial kitchen incubator. 4. Bridges Out of Poverty trainings for the community. 5. Poverty simulations.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    1. We constantly monitor pantry hours in rural areas to ensure food accessibility. 2. We are going to be providing bags for clients to carry their food home. 3. Implementing smaller partner pantries (through schools, senior centers, churches, etc.) to increase accessibility to food. 4. During a time of high rental assistance demand, we implemented an application status hotline to assist clients in learning the status of their rent assistance applications.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Community Action agencies are required to have at least 1/3 of their boards be those of low-income. This means the people we serve have always had a voice at the highest level in the organization. Community Action agencies have also been required to conduct needs assessments every three years. This means a formal assessment of those we serve is conducted every three years.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Community Action Services And Food Bank Inc

Board of directors
as of 10/14/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Margaret Black

Representing City of Orem

Term: 2018 - 2018

Kendall Crittenden

Wasatch County

Melissa George

Represents families with low-income

Jack Holmes

Change for Good

Kye Barnett

Brigham Young University

Margaret Black

Orem City

Sofia Waterman

Represents low-income persons

Kerry Newman

Zions Bank

Tara Riddle

Provo City

Richard Moore

Payson City

Helen Anderson

DoTerra

Amy Antioquia

Represents Low-income persons

Aaron Newman

Summit County

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/14/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/20/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.