PLATINUM2024

Utah Domestic Violence Advisory Council

Ending domestic violence in Utah through advocacy, education, collaboration, and leadership.

aka Utah Domestic Violence Coalition   |   Salt Lake City, UT   |  https://www.udvc.org/

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Mission

Our mission is to end domestic violence in Utah through advocacy, education, collaboration, and leadership. We envision a world where all individuals and families live free from violence, feel safe, empowered, and hopeful. Our core values are: Advocacy -advance public policy & statewide training that is trauma-informed. Collaboration -coordinate with partners & community stakeholders. Safety -promote genuine security for all people & support our members & partners who create safe communities. Empowerment -support our members & partners in serving those affected by violence. Dignity -treating everyone with the humanity they deserve. Social Change -social relationships, structures, & discourse are important sites of change. Intersectionality -promote inclusion & equity in all we do.

Ruling year info

1998

Executive Director

Jennifer Campbell

Main address

124 S 400 E, Ste 430

Salt Lake City, UT 84111 USA

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EIN

87-0524312

NTEE code info

Spouse Abuse, Prevention of (I71)

Sexual Abuse, Prevention of (I73)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (I01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our work is focused around these four essential areas: ADVOCATE: We propose, promote, and advise on policies and practices that enhance victim safety and empowerment while raising awareness of the need for prevention and intervention. COLLABORATE: We work closely with community-based victim service providers, key stakeholders, policy makers and community partners across Utah to provide comprehensive, trauma-informed, statewide services and responses. EDUCATE: We provide technical assistance and training to member programs, law enforcement and community partners, as well as work with media and others to raise awareness of domestic abuse and the need for prevention and intervention. CONNECT: We operate a 24-hour confidential hotline, known as the LINKLine: 1-800-897-LINK (5465), that offers trauma-informed support and connects survivors, friends, family, service providers and others to local resources.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Lethality Assessment Program (LAP)

The Lethality Assessment Program – Maryland Model (LAP) is a tool designed to reduce risks and save lives. Modeled after a similar program in Maryland, the LAP involves an assessment by law enforcement to determine risks and, if risks are identified, collaboration with community-based victim service providers. Working together, law enforcement officials and victim service providers are better able to support victims with a variety of processes to include, but not limited to, counseling, housing, medical, financial, legal and other needs.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Victims of crime and abuse
Families

UDVC's Core Advocacy Training or CAT is a 40-hour training that details the skills and knowledge necessary for advocates to support and empower survivors of domestic violence. We discuss dynamics of abuse, victim advocacy in practice, specialized topics like technological abuse, stalking, and sexual violence, and considerations for working with different marginalized populations.

We offer two options for completing the Core Advocacy Training: A 2-week course held over Zoom or training can be completed at your own pace through the recorded videos. Either option fulfills the state 40-hour victim advocacy training requirements.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Victims of crime and abuse
Families
Economically disadvantaged people
LGBTQ people

The LINKLine exists as a 24/7 free service to support anyone who has concerns about their own interpersonal relationship or the relationship of someone they care about. We accept calls from everyone: survivors, friends & family, coworkers, and even professional support persons like social workers, healthcare professionals, and clergy. The goal of the “LINK”Line is to link people to resources in their communities for ongoing support.

Every call to the LINKLine is anonymous and confidential, so you can trust that whatever is said stays between you and the advocate you talk to during the call. Each advocate is trained to answer calls in an empathetic, trauma-informed way. The advocates will listen to each caller without judgment, and offer support to meet the individual needs of each caller and their situation.

(If LINKLine advocates are experiencing an increased call volume, calls will be forwarded to the National Domestic Violence Hotline.)

Population(s) Served
Adults
Victims of crime and abuse
Families

UDVC's HomeSafe program is rooted in the Housing First model, which focuses on rapidly getting people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness into permanent housing.

The theory is that any issues that may have contributed to an individual or family becoming homeless can be best addressed after families are stably housed.

Focused on increasing survivors' access to and retention of stable housing, HomeSafe is guided by the safety and self-determination needs of domestic violence survivors and their children.

Population(s) Served

Survivors of domestic & intimate partner violence face a series of serious challenges. Many struggle to find a safe place to live, put food on the table, & create a lifestyle with financial stability. Protecting one’s money & other assets is a challenge that many survivors face because financial abuse is a tactic that many abusive partners use to hold power and control over their partners.

The Allstate Foundation curriculum was developed in partnership with the NNEDV & has been academically validated by Rutgers University. The information in the course is intended to be general advice for those in an abusive relationship.

The Allstate Foundation & UDVC have partnered since 2015; each year, UDVC partners with two domestic violence service providers across the state. The domestic violence service providers provide the Move Ahead curriculum throughout the year, plus provide one-on-one case management to survivors who chose to engage in the savings match & credit repair program.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Victims of crime and abuse

UDVC's policy & legislative work includes collaborating with elected and government officials, UDVC members, and other key stakeholders in the community and at the state level to advocate for the needs of domestic violence survivors and service providers.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Victims of crime and abuse
Families
LGBTQ people
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Victims of crime and abuse
Families
LGBTQ people

Where we work

External assessments

Evaluated via the Impact Genome Project (2019)

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of crisis hotline calls answered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

LINKLine 1-800-897-LINK (5465)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The LinkLine is a 24/7 statewide domestic violence hotline operated by UDVC. The LinkLine provides confidential trauma-informed support to anyone affected by domestic violence.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

LINKLine 1-800-897-LINK (5465)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The LinkLine is a 24/7 statewide domestic violence hotline operated by UDVC. The LinkLine provides confidential trauma-informed support to anyone affected by domestic violence.

Total number of LAPs implemented statewide

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Lethality Assessment Program (LAP)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The LAP is a tool designed to reduce risks and save lives through an assessment by law enforcement to determine risks and, if risks are identified, collaboration with victim service providers.

Number of hours of training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Core Advocacy Training (CATs)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

UDVC provides technical assistance and training to member programs, law enforcement, and community partners. We also strive to work collaboratively with media to raise awareness of DV and resources.

Number of total LAPs returning high danger scores

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Lethality Assessment Program (LAP)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

The LAP is a tool designed to reduce risks and save lives through an assessment by law enforcement to determine risks and, if risks are identified, collaboration with victim service providers.

Number of groups brought together in a coalition/alliance/partnership

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Home Safe Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

HomeSafe is a UDVC program rooted in the Domestic Violence Housing First approach, which focuses on rapidly getting people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness into permanent housing.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Inform Public Policy and Educate the Public through leveraging our unique position to inform elected leaders and the general public on effective approaches to assisting survivors.

2. Optimize Trainings and Technical Support to partners so that they can continue to provide excellent services and grow their capacity to help those in need

3. DEI work through strengthening relationships with a diverse set of like-minded organizations to enable an inclusive and culturally sensitive coordinated approach to end domestic violence.

4. Internal Improvements and Organizational Efficiency by implementing internal improvements to consistently and effectively serve our members and community partners.

1. a. Create a policy toolkit for member programs to help guide local representative talking points, how and when to approach elected officials, etc.
b. Leverage the policy committee to identify legislative priorities and coordinate policy efforts.
c. Continue to invest in public policy staff position to assist in advocacy efforts.
d. Launch and leverage awareness campaigns (awareness months, activities).
e. Create and distribute Annual impact reports to stakeholders.

2. a. Expand online accessibility to trainings.
b. Continue to diversify the topics and expertise levels of trainings provided to members and non-members alike.
c. Launch an online request system & create an internal procedure to respond to technical assistance queries.
d. Build out a Technical Assistance Library to ensure a continued legacy of knowledge.
e. Pursue funding for technical assistance coordinator position.

3. a. Create an advisory board to inform collaborative outreach and inclusion.
b. Increase engagement with rural programs.
c. Increase coordination efforts with community partners.
d. Evaluate and adjust as needed current marketing to ensure an inclusive and multi-culturally sensitive message.
e. Host regular meetings with the leaders of indigenous communities.
f. Secure funding for and recruit a lead communications position.
g. Continue board recruitment and expansion.

4. a. Professional staff development through internal trainings (technical trainings, advocates, onboarding, webinars, etc.).
b. Update internal policies and streamline process documents.
c. Optimize utilization of volunteer opportunities.
d. Create and leverage the intern program.
e. Expand Coalition technical capacity through software use (Coalition Manager, Tovuti, etc.).
f. Continue to update and improve website accessibility and user-interface.

UDVC engaged Tanner LLC to assist in the strategic planning process. As a first step in this process, Tanner performed community outreach to solicit feedback and identify opportunities to inform strategic priorities. The outreach included focus groups with staff, interviews with 20 different member and secondary programs, board surveys, and discussions with several service providers for indigenous communities. Participants in the process were open in sharing perceived strengths of the organizations, challenges they see, and opportunities for increasing impact.

After digesting the results of this outreach, the board and staff leadership identified high-level strategic priorities. The board then leveraged these priorities in the selection process of a new executive director to ensure that new leadership would share the same vision as identified by community outreach, helping build alignment and trust between the organization and its partners. Upon the selection and onboarding of a new Executive Director, a strategic planning document was developed and further refined through additional meetings with UDVC staff and the board. The document that follows was presented to the Board for final approval and adopted in April 2022.

This plan is intended to provide focus and allow each member of the team to see how they can impact UDVC’s most important priorities. UDVC fully expects that this will become a living document with periodic revisions as circumstances change. Detailed implementation plans have been developed that align with the priorities articulated in this plan.

1. a. The Take Action Tour helped inform our Top Concerns:
i. LAP referral increases/demand - capacity, complexity of cases, law enforcement training, system-based advocate collaboration.
ii. Housing.
iii. Direct financial assistance to survivors/families.
iv. Case management and therapy waitlists.
v. Staffing burn-out, turnover, and shortages.
vi. Stable and consistent funding - VOCA cuts.
b. In the 2023 General Session, UDVC actively monitored 125 bills and 8 funding requests with a DV impact, lending support to 32 of those bills and all 8 funding requests. We also engaged with legislators on 12 bills, with 4 classified as priority legislation. UDVC prioritized 4 bills and 1 significant funding request.
c. Exceeded our membership goal with 28 members and $29,801.73 collected in dues.
d. In October, we formed a formal partnership with ABC 4. Good Things Utah did morning interviews each week in the month.
e. Working on the template for this year will be completed by November. Will include DPS data on UIVLAP (LAP).

2. a. Conducted 20 online training events, 1312 individuals trained totaling 15,006 hours.
b. This year we:
i. Evaluated Series of Webinar Conversations that we held.
ii. Reviewed what core training we need and how we expand on that.
iii. Revamped looking at Core Advocacy Training CATS topics and how we strengthen that.
iv. Looked at ways to document workgroups.
v. Moved TA meetings to a monthly format.
c. Responded to 55 requests for technical assistance. Led 1 advanced training. Currently runs/supports 19 workgroups.
d. Identified models that won't fit our needs and are actively working on developing a better model.
e. Acquired funding and filled the position.

3. a. In 2023, we partnered with Community Organizing for Radical Empathy (CORE) that facilitated 16 focus groups and 71 assessments that engaged community partners, our dedicated staff, board members, and other vital contributors. As a result, we collaboratively formulated a five-year plan outlining strategies and actions to transform UDVC.
b. Our outreach team conducted 5 training sessions attended by 289 individuals.
c. Successfully increased membership costs, renewed all existing members, and added two new members.
d. Updated logos and marketing materials to be more inclusive, in line with DEI goals.
e. In process, but already conducted 2 training sessions with 44 individuals for 176 hours.
f. Acquired funding and filled the position.
g. Recruited 4 new board members.

4. a. Staff attended May training hosted by Children's Center and September Annual Conference.
b. Completed handbooks update for each program.
c. Started tracking the participation of all board members in our initiatives.
d. Focusing on securing program-specific interns with different universities.
e. Discontinued Coalition Manager and started a new, easier timesheet system.
f. Trained Communication Specialists on in-house website improvements with DEI focus.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

Utah Domestic Violence Advisory Council
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Utah Domestic Violence Advisory Council

Board of directors
as of 01/19/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sumit Shukla

Inunity

Term: 2023 - 2024

Debbie Comstock, LCSW

Private Practice, Training & Consultation

Sonia Salari, PhD

U of U, Dept of Family & Consumer Studies

Sumit Shukla

Inunity

Martha Burkett Fallis, LCSW

Amethyst Center for Healing

Annie Isabel Fukushima, PhD

U of U, Dept of Ethnic Studies, Transform, GBVC

Jana C Fulmer, CMHC, NCC

Amethyst Center for Healing

Leah Moses, CNM

Intermountain Healthcare

Brandon Merrill, JD

Utah Homicide Survivors

Ruth Hays

Goldman Sachs

Michael Jenny Scott

Utah Dept of Corrections - Adult Probation & Parole

Antonette Gray

Salt Lake Community College & Utah Valley University

Natalie Kirtley

BYU Counseling & Psychological Services

Sara Mejeur

Intermountain Health – McKay Dee Hospital

Tyler Woolstenhulme

Appfire

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/18/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/25/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.