GOLD2022

Conservation Through Poverty Alleviation International, Inc.

aka CPALI   |   Walla Walla, WA   |  www.cpali.org

Mission

CPALI is an international NGO dedicated to a community-centered approach to conservation. The CPALI mission is to contribute to natural resource conservation by developing integrated, small-scale enterprise systems that link the livelihoods of farm families to maintaining natural ecosystems.

Ruling year info

2004

President, CEO

Dr. Catherine Craig

Main address

712 S. Palouse St.

Walla Walla, WA 99362 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

87-0713649

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Management & Technical Assistance (C02)

Science, General (includes Interdisciplinary Scientific Activities) (U20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Over the past 15 years CPALI have been working with SEPALI Madagascar to explore a new approach to conservation that focuses on identifying the economic value of previously unrecognized endemic products and their transformation into marketable goods. While biological hotspots around the world are an integral part of our environment, the protection of these areas has often been at the expense of local people. CPALI identifies and implements a network of interconnected natural products that allows rural farmers to directly benefit from conserving the protected areas from which they were excluded. Instead of building boundaries, CPALI focuses on people and strengthens the existing relationship between local people and their environment through the development of sustainable livelihoods.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Silkworm Rearing Training

Our silkworm training program is a step-by-step process. Although CPALI members learn about the silk continuously from the moment they join our program, we also have a formal, three step process to assist our breeders.
The first step includes an overview of the silk process, rearing manual in the local dialect, and a hands-on demonstration in a small group.
In step two, farmers receive one-on-one attention and are walked through the process step by step on their own land. During this phase, local trainers take over and assist individuals as they begin to experiment with the rearing process.
Once a farmer becomes an experienced novice, the program enters step three. A silkworm expert from the CPALI team returns to that community and stays for the duration of a month-long rearing cycle to answer any specific questions each breeder may have and work side-by-side with our new breeders.
Throughout this process, a local leadership network is provided for support and the CPALI team continues to meet with farmer groups on a monthly basis to troubleshoot problems and answer questions.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Summary:
In the past year, our donors helped us train skilled artisans and grow wild silk production from a trickle into a stream, transforming Malagasy lives, empowering women and inspiring a community. This year, CPALI is setting the bar even higher and increasing livelihood accessibility for the most vulnerable communities with raffia weaving.CPALI is transforming the lives of rural artisans in Madagascar by supporting technical skills and training for wild silk production and raffia weaving.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Development Marketplace Finalist 2008

World Bank

SEED Award SEPALI Madagascar 2012

UN, UNDP IUCN

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

-Identify native products that can be sustainably produced and sold to provide added income to subsistence farmers
-Provide jobs for women to support childhood education
-Implement mixed crop farming that enhances nutrition and contributes to ecosystem health.

CPALI identifies and implements a network of interconnected natural products that can add value to farmers' lives and support protected areas from which farmers have been economically displaced. The project in Madagascar, led by a local team, is building silk production to meet international market demands. As they work towards self-sufficiency, CPALI is working to link SEPAL Madagascar to international markets through both wholesale and retail approaches. We aim to leave a functional and sustainable silk and raffia business the ads income to support subsistence farmers and their families. Utilizing local leadership, endemic resources, and community strengths, CPALI aims to share its unique approach to conservation with people around the world.

CPALI's greatest strength is that it utilizes resources that are already present: endemic species, local leadership, community networks and cultural knowledge. In Madagascar, our Malagasy staff manages the entire project and hires lead farmers in each community to serve as local liaisons, trainers, and model farmers. Women's groups organized by local women provide leadership opportunities and a chance to earn additional income by weaving the silkworm rearing baskets used by farmers to process the wild silk. They also weave raffia belts and make cocoon-silk textiles. Valuing native products that surround communities and helping villagers to cultivate them helps people experience the value of conservation for both immediate and future returns.

Our second strategy is our workshop led by women who are trained by experienced designers to make products for first economy markets. We designed a unique, no-kill silk, cocoon -silk textile to introduce a new, non-commodity products. Our unique silk textiles are suitable for wall decor, art hangings, table top placemats and runners, art materials, and jewelry products, curtains and shades. Hence we are accessing new markets to develop strong partnerships for the Malagasy to continue.

CPALI's greatest strength is that it utilizes resources that are already present: native species, local leadership, community networks, and cultural traditions. In Madagascar, our exclusively Malagasy staff manage the entire project and hire lead farmers in each community to serve as our local liaisons, trainers, and model farmers. Women's groups provide women leadership opportunities and a chance to earn additional income by weaving the rearing equipment used by each farmer, processing the wild silk, and making textiles. The native ecosystems cultivated by the farmers allow local people to see and realize both immediate and future returns from conservation. Together with local communities, CPALI is designing a better way to work with nature.

CPALI needs strategic expertise from new staff to help us move forward with the intensive development work and fundraising necessary for expanding to new sites. This development will require assistance in biology, tropical agriculture, social media, product design, and marketing. Building our US staff would enable us to expand CPALI's conservation program faster by enhancing our educational initiatives as well as the introduction of additional endemic resources that farmers can produce for food and cash. These in turn support protected area plant and animal diversity by lessoning non-sustainabl, natural resource harvesting.

During the first phase of the program CPALI identified native resource farming as a new means of income-generation where few other opportunities are available before. We designed new products with the help of the Malagasy team. Our 13 farmer networks, representing more than 300 famers, have planted over 30,000 trees, produced over 40,000 cocoons and reforested more than 75,000 meters of buffer forest edging Makira Natural Park. Our greatest accomplishment, although less tangible, is the foundation of trust we have developed with our farmers and the shift in their perspective in terms of the availability and abundance of resources.

During the second phase of the program, we have extended the program to two new areas and have included up to 5 species of silk moth cocoons in product production. In addition we added locally sourced raffia to the endemic products the we we work with. Our agricultural program is now established in 3 different areas and we have a well-established an artisans workshop that employs a team of 15 individuals who are members of the farmers families.

The third phase of the program has been focused on scaling up our marketing program. We are establishing lasting partnerships with wholesale companies such as Faire, retailers that include IBU and our own retail, market site, www.Tanana silk.com.

Financials

Conservation Through Poverty Alleviation International, Inc.
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Conservation Through Poverty Alleviation International, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 11/25/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Catherine Craig

Leslie Brunetta

CPALI

Robert Weber

CPALI

Catherine Craig

CPALI

Tim Barclay

CPALI

Amelia Thrall

CPALI

Heidi MacLean

CPALI

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/9/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data