PLATINUM2024

R.O.S.E. Resources/Outreach To Safeguard the Elderly

Phoenix, AZ   |  https://www.roseadvocacy.org

Mission

Mission: To prevent the financial exploitation and defrauding of the older adults (seniors) through advocacy and education. R.O.S.E. was founded to lead the effort in delivering effective, concise, and face-to-face educational programs to the seniors, with a focus on those age 60 and over, (and their families) in Arizona. Goal: To reduce the number of victims of financial scams and the related financial losses through educational tools and resources on prevalent and dangerous scams targeting the senior population. Prevention skills and resources will be provided through educational workshops.

Ruling year info

2021

Board President

Joyce Petrowski

Board Treasurer

Cindy Creed

Main address

PO Box 50280

Phoenix, AZ 85076 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

87-2478349

NTEE code info

Adult, Continuing Education (B60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023 and 2022.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Older adults (seniors) are huge targets for scammers because of their philanthropic and trusting nature. In 2023, older adults (seniors) in the U.S. reported losing $3.4 Billion to the despicable scammers. It is estimated that about 15 to 20% of older adults (seniors) actually report when they are a victim of a scam, therefore, the actual losses are exponentially more! This population grew up without technology, no cell phones or computers. When you bring this along with trusting and philanthropic nature into today's technologically advanced world, it is a perfect storm. According to the Federal Trade Commission, in the United States, older adults are more likely to experience monetary losses due to scams. Scams can lead to emotional distress, anxiety, and a sense of violation among older adults. Victims often experience shame, embarrassment, and a loss of self-esteem as a result of falling for scams.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Preventing elderly financial defrauding and exploitation

Our goal is to reduce the number of victims of financial frauds and the monetary loss, with a focus on those age 60 and over. R.O.S.E. seeks to create change by educating and providing awareness of financial scams that typically target the older/elderly population, with a focus on those age 60 and over. We have seen a drastic increase in the number of victims over the age of 60 and monetary loss and we aim to reduce the number of victims through effective, concise, and face-to-face educational programs geared to the elderly population and their families.

Population(s) Served
Older adults
Seniors

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Preventing elderly financial defrauding and exploitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people on the organization's email list

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Preventing elderly financial defrauding and exploitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of audience members with favorable attitudes towards the issue or interest

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Preventing elderly financial defrauding and exploitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Preventing elderly financial defrauding and exploitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

R.O.S.E. started in August 2021 and began educational presentation in early 2022. We were able to educate over 300 attendees during 2022, all with 4 or 5 out of 5 on our surveys.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to reduce the number of victims of scams and the related financial losses.

A study published in the International Psychogeriatrics Journal found that older adults who fell victim to scams had higher levels of psychological distress and reported a decline in their overall mental well being. Older adults are particularly susceptible to scams due to factors such as cognitive decline, social isolation, and a higher level of trust. Scammers exploit these vulnerabilities to gain access to the older adult's financial resources. The National Council on Aging estimates that around one in ten Americans aged 60 and above have experienced some form of elder financial abuse, which includes scams and other forms of exploitation.

The stress and financial strain caused by scams can have detrimental effects on the physical health of older adults. Studies have shown that victims of financial fraud have higher rates of hypertension, depression, and other stress-related health conditions. Financial losses can also result in reduced access to healthcare, medication, and other necessary resources, leading to further health complications for older adults.

In a study in the American Journal of Public Health in 2017 (Prevalence of Financial Fraud and Scams Among Older Adults in the United States: A Systematic Review and Meta Analysis) found the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention recognized financial exploitation of older adults as a serious public health problem. Elder financial exploitation victimization is associated with mortality, hospitalization, and poor physical and mental health. Without effective primary prevention strategies, the absolute scope of this problem will escalate with the growing population of older adults.

This is exactly what we have seen over the last five years. Older adults in the United States reported losing over $500 Million in 2018 to an astronomical $3.4 Billion in 2023.

R.O.S.E. has the effective primary prevention strategy with our Fraud Awareness and Protection Program designed specifically for the older adults.

1. R.O.S.E.'s Fraud Awareness and Protection Program - comprehensive, educational program designed specifically for the older adults on a recurring basis. We all know we need to hear the message many times in order for the message to become a habit, to become second nature. We want every older adult to develop a healthy skepticism when it comes to unexpected contact, which is usually from a scammer. Our program delivers the statistics of scams in order to emphasize the drastic problem. We also discuss specific scams that have a tendency to target the older adults so they can better understand the scam. We developed "Anatomy of a Scam" and have a federal copyright. This helps the older adults understand scams in general and falling victim to a scam is an emotional reaction not a rational one. The most important part of our program is the take-home resources, tips, and tools we discuss so the older adults know how to protect themselves and their hard-earned assets.

2. A new program we are launching is and interactive workshop where we show the older adults how to implement the many resources, tips, and tools we discuss in our Fraud Awareness and Protection program.

3. Monthly emailed and mailed newsletter - this helps to reinforce knowledge, bring new information and resources. We recognize that not every older adult prefers to received and read their information via email. This is why we developed our mailed newsletter.

4. Biweekly "Let's Talk About Scams" podcast - in this biweekly podcast we discuss scams, how to protect yourself, interview people who have fallen victim or almost fell victim to learn through their experiences. Each person has a unique experience that we can all learn from.

5. Social media - we are on Facebook and LinkedIn and stay active posting about 4 to 5 times a week with a variety of information, some of which we curate from other reliable sources. Our social media links are on our home page of our website at https://www.roseadvocacy.org

6. We are developing a program for the adult children of the older adults or the sandwich generation. This program will have some of the same information as our Fraud Awareness and Protection program and it will also include how to start and continue the scam conversation with your loved ones. You can be their trusted person. What to do/say when you find out that your loved one fell victim to a scam.

You can sign up for our newsletters on the home page of our website, https://www.roseadvocacy.org and also on the website under resources, then Podcasts, you can subscribe to our podcast.

Contact us at info@roseadvocacy to discuss how we can bring one or more of our programs to your loved ones.

We have a very diverse board of directors and advisory board members with backgrounds in a variety of cybersecurity areas. Our Director of Program Services has an extensive background of working with the older adults in a variety of different senior communities.

In addition we have relationships with the FBI, FTC, and Assistant U.S. Attorney's Office where we are able to garner valuable information on cases they are seeing especially ones where scammers have evolved and changed their techniques. This assists us getting current information out on a more timely basis.

We participated in the Stop Senior Scams, Scams Against Older Adults Advisory Group; specifically with the Consumer Outreach and Guiding Principles Committees. The was a year-long (2023) process of developing the best practices with getting scam information out to the older adults along with up to date verbiage to use when communicating with older adults.

We began delivering our Fraud Awareness and Protection educational program to the older adults in Arizona in January 2022 and have served over 2,800 older adults. We have noticed a large increase in the number of older adults served just in the first four months of 2024. We anticipate a large increase in the number of older adults served in 2024 alone.

Each attendee is given a survey at the end of every presentation. Here are some of the responses to the question "How are you better prepared to respond when you are contacted by a scammer?"

"Hang up or delete. Verify with my son before I do anything"
"Check my emotions first and verify, verify, verify"
"Much more aware that people wanting to friend me of Facebook are most likely scammers"
"Now well equipped as to how to respond, due to the imperative information I received today"
"Don't answer unknown calls"
"More informed and prepared"

We have also learned from our attendees and have made changes to our presentation to adapt to their suggestions.

We heard the attendees would like a program geared towards implementing the resources, tips, and tools so we have created this program.

We changed the font color on some of the power point pages in order to help them read/see the information.

We are adding new slides to our power point presentation based on what information the attendees are asking for.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

R.O.S.E. Resources/Outreach To Safeguard the Elderly
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

R.O.S.E. Resources/Outreach To Safeguard the Elderly

Board of directors
as of 06/20/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Joyce Petrowski

Tom Plachecki

Eamonn Ahearne

Cindy Creed

Robert Guthrie

Mike Maunu

John Penman

Eric Briggs

Erin Elliott

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/29/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data