PLATINUM2024

California Commission On Sexual Exploitation

We Saw A Problem. We Became The Solution.

Sacramento, CA   |  www.CalCOSE.com

Mission

We aim to reduce criminal behavior by the application of evidence-based and trauma-informed services that address the culture and institutions that profit from, perpetrate, or promote sexual violence. Our services are proven to decrease the risk for recidivism by taking a risk-needs-responsivity approach. ​

Ruling year info

2022

President

Tiara King

Main address

3631 Truxel Rd # 1079

Sacramento, CA 95834 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

87-4596936

NTEE code info

Counseling Support Groups (F60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We saw a problem. We became the solution. Our program is dedicated to addressing sexual violence in all its forms, including sexual exploitation, sex trafficking, pornography, the purchase of commercial sex, and all other forms of sexually offensive behavior. Our organization recognizes the urgent need to employ rehabilitative mechanisms to prevent future harm. By providing evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), we are able to address the root causes of sexual violence, promote accountability, and create a society where individuals can reclaim their lives and contribute positively to their communities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Sex Trafficking Demand Reduction Exploiters Accountability Treatment Program

An intervention to decrease the demand for purchasing sex. Participants find accountability by confronting the harm and exploitation of those sold into prostitution.

Sex trafficking is fueled by the demand to buy sex.

Population(s) Served

The primary goal of the Sex Offender Treatment Program (SOTP) is to provide a higher level of community protection by assisting individuals who have engaged in illegal or deviant sexual behavior. Utilizing evidence-based therapeutic interventions, our therapist address inappropriate sexual behavior with the aim of preventing future victimization. Our services are tailored to a diverse clientele, including adult, adolescent, and developmentally delayed offenders, as well as victims and their families.
We work closely with the California Sex Offender Management Board (CASOMB), which is responsible for certifying treatment providers in the state. CASOMB ensures that programs like ours adhere to the highest standards of care and employ evidence-based practices to effectively rehabilitate offenders and protect the community.

Population(s) Served
Families
Parents
At-risk youth
Incarcerated people
Victims and oppressed people

Our program is designed to address the growing issue of problematic pornography consumption, which can lead to the exploitation and abuse of vulnerable individuals, including minors. We take a multi-faceted approach to prevention and treatment, drawing on the latest research and evidence-based practices.
At the core of our program is the recognition that pornography consumption is a complex issue, often rooted in underlying mental health challenges, trauma, or addictive behaviors. As such, our treatment model incorporates both individual and group therapy, as well as educational components to help clients develop healthy coping mechanisms and build resilience.
We also place a strong emphasis on prevention and community education. We collaborate with schools, youth organizations, and other stakeholders to raise awareness about the harms of problematic pornography consumption and to equip individuals with the knowledge and skills to make healthy choices.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
At-risk youth
Adults
Children and youth
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Religious groups

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric relates to the number of enrolled program participants on average.

Number of participants reporting no relapse 12 months post-program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Participants employ strategies to recognize, manage, and control their emotions effectively. Arrest records are an indicator of progress.

Number of clients who self-report increased skills/knowledge after educational program/intervention

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Interventions focus on building specific skills to manage triggers, cope with stress, communicate effectively, develop empathy, and practice healthy relationship behaviors.

Number of participants changing undesirable behavior, as reported by experts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

According to a meta-analysis conducted by Hanson, Bourgon, Helmus, and Hodgson in 2009, similar programs were associated with a 10%-13% reduction in recidivism rates compared to untreated individuals.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they avoid risky behaviors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Statistics are based on our comprehensive youth program aimed at preventing and addressing problematic sexual behavior.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The California Commission on Sexual Exploitation endeavors to address the root causes of sexual violence by providing evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy to those who perpetrate, promote, or profit from sexually problematic behavior. By tackling distorted beliefs, trauma, and socialization, our program aims to rehabilitate individuals, foster accountability, and prevent reoffending. Through collaboration with legal systems, continuous research, and a commitment to understanding and addressing multiple forms of sexual violence, we work towards creating a society where individuals can reclaim their lives, make amends, and contribute positively to building safer and more respectful communities.

We recognize the critical need to address this gap in intervention strategies. Our organization is working to:

Provide Evidence-Based Therapy: By offering evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy, we aim to address the root causes of harmful behaviors. Our program focuses on promoting empathy, accountability, and personal growth to prevent reoffending and break the cycle of violence.

Target Multiple Forms of Sexual Violence: We acknowledge that sexual violence encompasses various forms, our comprehensive approach ensures that our therapy addresses the underlying factors contributing to each form, tailoring interventions to meet the unique needs of individuals.

Address Underlying Factors: Perpetrators and offenders often have complex histories of trauma, distorted beliefs, and socialization that contribute to their harmful behaviors. We delve into these underlying factors and provide therapy that challenges distorted thinking, builds empathy, addresses power imbalances, and promotes healthy relationships.

Foster Accountability and Responsibility: Our program emphasizes the importance of accountability and personal responsibility in preventing sexual violence. Through therapy, participants are guided to understand the impact of their actions, take responsibility for their behavior, and actively work towards making amends and contributing positively to society.

Collaborate with Legal Systems: We recognize the significance of collaboration with legal systems to ensure appropriate referrals, monitoring, and support. By working closely with relevant criminal justice and law enforcement stakeholders, we are able to create a seamless integration of therapy within the criminal justice system, promoting rehabilitation as an essential component of the overall response to sexual violence.

Research and Continuous Improvement: California Commission on Sexual Exploitation is committed to conducting research to evaluate the effectiveness of our therapy interventions, identify best practices, and continually improve our programs. By basing our approaches on evidence-based practices, we strive to enhance outcomes and contribute to the wider field of behavioral and mental health.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

California Commission On Sexual Exploitation
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

California Commission On Sexual Exploitation

Board of directors
as of 03/30/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Tiara King

Tanisha Eddington

Aleigha West

Shirley Smith

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/30/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/30/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.