PLATINUM2024

Diabetes Research Connection

It takes a community to connect for a cure

Mission

The Diabetes Research Connection facilitates rapid funding of peer-reviewed, discovery-stage investigations, giving promising early-career scientists the opportunity to challenge the frontiers of type 1 diabetes research. Donors are empowered to support research projects of their choice, and interact with young researchers whose curiosity and vision will help define the future of diabetes research.

Ruling year info

2012

President and Chair

Eric Zwisler

Chief Financial Officer

David Winkler

Main address

1400 Maiden Lane

Del Mar, CA 92014 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

90-0815395

NTEE code info

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (G12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

One out of every hundred Americans has type 1 diabetes. Millions of children and adults struggle with this autoimmune disease. Despite these numbers, funding for diabetes research has declined. Of the funding available, 97% goes to established scientists. Scientific breakthroughs often emerge due to the inventiveness of early-career scientists. Albert Einstein revealed his theory of general relativity at 26. Banting & Best discovered insulin before they turned 33. Imagine our world today if these scientists had not received funding for their research? These young scientists have exciting new ideas however, mainstream funding rarely supports them, so their ideas simply can’t off the ground…until now.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Grant administration

The DRC provides funding for early-career scientists to perform innovative research in type 1 diabetes

Population(s) Served
Adults

The DRC connects donors and research scientists in the mutual pursuit of answers about diabetes

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Live Well San Diego 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

Grant administration

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of organizations applying for grants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

Grant administration

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Scientists from across the country submit their projects through our website. Members of our panel of more than 80 of the leading diabetes experts review each proposal.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with diseases and illnesses

Related Program

Grant administration

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

DRC funds early-career scientists ' vetted research projects for up to $50,000.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our mission is to connect donors with early-career scientists enabling them to perform peer-reviewed, novel research designed to prevent and cure type 1 diabetes, minimize its complications and improve the quality of life for those living with the disease.

DRC utilizes the online mechanism called “crowdfunding” because it connects scientists just starting out in their research career directly to the crowd of people seeking solutions to diabetes.

The seed money supporters provide through DRC’s website will help ensure that innovative ideas can be pursued. Without this source of funding, the number of researchers in diabetes is certain to decline and a cure will be that more difficult to find.

Scientists from across the country submit their projects through our website. Members of our panel of more than 80 of the leading diabetes experts review each proposal for innovation, value and feasibility. These established scientists donate their time and expertise to encourage the next generation of diabetes investigators.

- $2M has been distributed directly to early-career scientists to perform new Type One Diabetes research.

- 44 research projects have been funded since 2015.

-First to use crowdfunding to support a specific disease and is helping other disease-focused nonprofits, like the American Brain Foundation, emulate our platform to raise funds for their research.

-The only organization that can provide researchers with funds in as few as six months.

- 3 of DRC's supported early-career scientists have gone on to establish their own labs and 3 have had their research project's results published.

- $8.4M has been secured in follow-on funding from 7 of our DRC supported projects

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently

Financials

Diabetes Research Connection
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Diabetes Research Connection

Board of directors
as of 02/06/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Eric Zwisler

Nigel Calcutt

University of California, San Diego

Charles King

Pediatric Diabetes Research Center, UCSD

Alberto Hayek

University of California, San Diego

Vincenzo Cirulli

University of Washington

Matthias VonHerrath

La Jolla Institute

Ron Leibow

David Winkler

Del Mar Partnership

Steve Korniczky

Sheppard Mullen

Amy Adams

Tarson Investments

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/6/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/10/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.