The Rescue Mission

Help | Hope | Healing

aka Tacoma Rescue Mission   |   Tacoma, WA   |  www.trm.org

Mission

The Mission exists to offer God's help, hope and healing to the most vulnerable and impoverished members of our Community.

Notes from the nonprofit

We are grateful to our community for their sincere concern for those who are experiencing homelessness. Thank you.

Ruling year info

1940

Executive Director

Mr. DUke Paulson

Main address

P.O. Box 1912

Tacoma, WA 98401 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Tacoma Rescue Mission

City Rescue Mission

Tacoma Commons Mission

EIN

91-0565014

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Alcohol, Drug and Substance Abuse, Dependency Prevention and Treatment (F20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adams Street Family Shelter (homeless women & families)

Emergency shelter for unaccompanied women and families with children.  Clients residing in emergency shelter receive case management to help them establish goals for their shelter stay and create action plans that include specific steps for them to take to reach their goals.
 
The shelter is housed in a beautiful newly constructed facility located in a peaceful, healing environment.  Our goal is to treat clients with respect and to impart to them they are of value and have something to contribute to society.

Population(s) Served

The New Life Program is a free-of-charge ten month residential alcohol/drug addiction recovery program for men, women, and families.  The program is faith-based.  Clients do not need to be Christian, but they have to understand that this is the program orientation and must be willing to participate in studying the Bible. Clients are also expected to become involved in a church or synagogue of their choice so that they will be developing natural supports in the community for when they exit the program.
 
While in the program, clients participate in a Christian-based emotional healing curriculum known as the "Genesis Process."  They also study the Bible, meet with a mentor, and do work therapy.  Those who do not have high school diplomas participate in adult basic education or study to obtain their GED (high school equivalency) diplomas.  
 
No government funding is accepted for this program so that it can remain faith-based.  The Mission believes that the spiritual component of this program is vital.  Clients who graduate from the program often have very moving testimonies of the way their lives have been transformed.

Population(s) Served

The Good Neighbor Cafe serves breakfast and supper every day of the year to anyone in need of food.  People eat anonymously, and we try to help them feel valued and respected.  The Cafe often serves as an entry point for our other programs, because people come for food and find out about our addiction recovery program, or our shelters and transitional housing programs.

Population(s) Served

The Downtown Campus houses our shelter for single men, free laundry facilities, a place to receive mail, and lockers to store things.  The same facility houses other programs that help the homeless transition to self-sufficiency, so our shelter often serves as an entry point for the other programs.

Population(s) Served

The Child-Youth Program serves the children of homeless families residing in Rescue Mission facilities. 
 
*Preschool children 2-5 years old who live with their parents in Rescue Mission transitional housing. 
 
*Elementary school children participate in after school homework help and tutoring that takes place every weekday during the school year.
 
*The Youth Program also includes field trips and other fun learning and self-esteem building activities for children, including individual mentoring. 
 
*Special teen nights engage teens and demonstrate that fun can be healthy and safe. Individual tutoring is also available to teens.

Population(s) Served

Adult Basic Education/ GED test preparation; Open to the community. free of charge.

Population(s) Served

Tyler Street Family Campus has 27 apartments ranging from 2-4 bedrooms. The program is for homeless families with children. The goal of the program is to help homeless families transition to self-sufficient and productive lives in the community. The program includes case management, adult education, career coaching, life skills classes including budgeting, parenting, and computer literacy.

Population(s) Served

The Veteran's Resource Center offers case management and information and referral to veterans who are homeless. The center is located in the same facility as the Rescue Mission's emergency shelter for men. Ten beds are reserved for homeless veterans.

Population(s) Served

We create scalable small businesses to provide on-the-job training, support, leadership developing to adults experiencing homelessness

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

Community Partner of the Year 2006

United Way Pierce County

Best Christian Workplace 2010

Best Christian Workplaces Institute

Best Nonprofit Workplace 2009

Business Examiner

Best Nonprofit Workplace 2010

Business Examiner

Best Christian Workplace 2011

Best Christian Workplaces Institute

Affiliations & memberships

United Way Member Agency 2013

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Good Neighbor Cafe (hospitality kitchen - breakfast and supper daily)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Includes all meals provided through our Good Neighbor Cafe to clients served at any TRM location

Number of people in the area with access to affordable housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number of clients left the Mission and entered directly into stable, long-term housing.

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

By receiving support through TRM's case managers and career navigators, this number of individuals left the Rescue Mission with gainful employment

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of children and youth who were served by the Mission's youth program, receiving care, mentoring and educational support.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goals of the Rescue Mission are to meet homeless people's immediate needs for food and shelter and help them move from homelessness to self-sufficient and productive lives in the community.

1) Strategies to provide for homeless people's immediate needs for food and shelter
a) Emergency shelter for unaccompanied men
b) Emergency shelter for unaccompanied women and families with children
c) Hospitality kitchen that provides free breakfast and supper every day of the year to anyone in need
d) Clothing and other items available free of charge to people in need

2) Strategies to help people transition from homelessness to self-sufficient and productive lives in the community.
a) Veteran's Resource Center that provides case management to homeless veterans and connects them with their entitlements
b) Transitional Housing apartments with case management, career coaching, adult education, and life skills classes
c) Free, faith-based, year-long residential addiction recovery for men, women, and families with children
d) Adult Basic Education (adult literacy, math) and GED (high school equivalency diploma) preparation
e) Career Coaching and help accessing post-secondary vocational training, college programs, or internships
f) Child/Youth Program that engages children and youth through developmentally appropriate and enrichment programming to increase self-esteem, emotional health, social and academic skills.

RESCUE MISSION RESOURCES:

*Active and diligent Board of Trustees.

*Fiscally responsible Chief Executive Officer.

*Dedicated staff.

*Numerous eager and helpful volunteers.

*Valuable community partnerships with other agencies.

*Contracts with local government entities.

*Generous funding from foundations and corporations.

*Vital donations (small and large) from individuals in the community who are concerned about people in need.

*Gifts-in-kind including food, clothing, household, baby, and hygiene items that help leverage financial donations

*More than 100 years of agency experience serving the homeless (agency established in 1912).

*Beautiful facilities.

*Targeted programming.

*Clients who want to become their best.

FY 2014-15 OUTPUTS:

* Number of unduplicated clients served: 2,445 known because they have accessed services that require IDs, and hundreds more not counted who eat anonymously in our hospitality kitchen.

* Number of nights of shelter: 154,028 (average of 421 clients per night)

* Number of meals served: 311,334 (an average of 850 per day).

FY 2014-15 OUTCOMES:

* Shelter for Women and Families Outcome- Improved Family Stability: 44.3% of all clients; 83.6% of case managed clients.

* Good Neighbor Cafe (hospitality kitchen) Outcome- Immediate Need for Food Met: 89.5%.

* Emergency Services Men's Shelter Outcome- Immediate Need for Shelter Met: 77.5%

THE DATA BELOW IS FROM 2013-14 and needs updated....sorry I did not get to this yet!

* Transitional housing at Tyler Street Family Campus
Exiting into permanent housing: 82%
Becoming employed by exit: 50%
Receiving TANF at exit: 41% (compared to 82% at entry) - half were able to exit TANF
Increased income at exit: 32%

* The New Life Program (addiction recovery)- Persistence in Residential Program to Graduation (a period of about nine months): 33%

BEYOND DATA:

Outputs measure the number of clients served and the numbers of units of service they receive (nights of shelter, meals, hours of case management, etc.)

Outcomes measure the percentage of clients who achieve the changes that services are designed to produce.

Hidden in all these numbers are real human beings. The changes in their lives do not seem adequately reflected when they are reduced to statistics. For this reason, whenever possible, we include photos and stories of clients. Stories and pictures, too, are just reflections of reality, but they flesh out data a bit, helping readers imagine how life changes feel from the standpoint of clients.

However, changes in client lives are important not only to clients themselves, their families, and their friends. Personalities, experiences, goals, and achievements combine to make each of us unique and valuable to the rest of humanity. We are all in this together: when one falls we all falter, and when he/she stands up again, we all walk lighter. When a client leaves homelessness for a self-sufficient and productive life in the community, the immediate community benefits, and ripples proceed outward that affect the rest us. no matter where we are located.

Financials

The Rescue Mission
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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The Rescue Mission

Board of directors
as of 6/18/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Katie Bering

Katie Bering

Toby Jackson

TZ Jackson CPA, PLLC

Tilton Sugi

Department of Parks & Recreations, County of Hawaii, Retired

Gary Viers

Unviersity of Washington

John Gaines

Tacoma Public Utilities

Amy Welch

Auburn Volkswagen

Tim Walter

King County Housing Authority

Austin Miller

Theory Real Estate

Ryan Knicely

Windermere Abode Real Estate

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No