UNITED WAY OF WHATCOM COUNTY

LIVE UNITED

Bellingham, WA   |  www.unitedwaywhatcom.org

Mission

To unite with a network of non-profits, local businesses, and community stakeholders to enable financial stability for every person in Whatcom County.

Ruling year info

1953

Interim CEO

Kara Irvin

Main address

1500 Cornwall Ave., Suite 203

Bellingham, WA 98225 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-0570788

NTEE code info

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We focus on helping individuals and families who are struggling financially, with a specific focus on the ALICE population. ALICE stands for Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed and refers to hardworking people in our community who, despite having one or more jobs, still don't earn enough to make ends meet. Many people think the Federal Poverty Level is a measure of who’s getting by and who isn’t, but this number is outdated and incredibly low. The Federal Poverty Level for a family of four is just over $26,000 a year. The ALICE data shows us that a family of four in Whatcom County would need to earn approximately $60,000 annually to afford basic needs like food, housing, transportation, healthcare, technology, and child care in our community. By funding a wide range of programs working to provide access to basic needs, increase economic mobility, and break the cycle of poverty in our community, we are helping local individuals and families become financially stable.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Impact Fund

Our Community Impact Fund grants support more than 20 local non-profit programs working to provide basic needs, increase economic mobility, and break the cycle of poverty. By partnering with programs that assist families and individuals who struggle financially, we work to create a stronger, more resilient, and sustainable Whatcom County.

Population(s) Served

Emergency Recovery Fund grants help local non-profit agencies meet increasing demands and address emerging issues due to the COVID-19 crisis. Funds have also been granted to help organizations transform their service delivery methods to meet social distancing requirements. This fund was set up to make sure our local nonprofits are equipped to provide vital services to help our community survive and recover from COVID-19.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Families
Health
Adults
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Families
Health

Where we work

Awards

Extraordinary Dedication and Commitment as an Early Learning Champion 2012

NW Early Learning & the Whatcom Early Learning Alliance

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students who exhibit kindergarten readiness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers

Related Program

Community Impact Fund

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In our 2019 -2020 fiscal year, 1,602 kids gained crucial early learning skills and became prepared for school.

Number of youth who demonstrate that their school attendance has improved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Community Impact Fund

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

In our 2019-2020 fiscal year, 1,448 youth increased their academic success, improved their grades, and were put on track to graduate from high school.

Number of students who demonstrate the desire to succeed in the academic setting

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Community Impact Fund

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

In our 2019-2020 fiscal year, 1,448 youth increased their academic success, improved their grades, and were put on track to graduate from high school.

Number of people in the area with access to affordable housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In our 2019-2020 fiscal year, 407 individuals and families achieved safe, stable, and affordable housing.

Individuals received skills, food, or necessities to offset their monthly bills and increase financial stability

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Community Impact Fund

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

In our 2018-2019 fiscal year, 19,621 individuals received skills, food, or necessities to offset their monthly bills and increase financial stability.

People achieved healthier lifestyles through exercise, nutrition, and overall better life choices

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Community Impact Fund

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

In our 20198-2020 fiscal year, 8,175 people achieved healthier lifestyles through exercise, nutrition, and overall better life choices.

Individuals and families received support to recover from or prevent violence or abuse

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Community Impact Fund

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

In our 2019-2020 fiscal year, 5,727 individuals and families received support to recover from or prevent violence or abuse.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We fight to ensure that all Whatcom County residents have the tools and opportunities they need to become financially independent. We support a wide variety of programs designed to provide access to basic needs, increase economic mobility, and break the cycle of poverty in our community.

Together, with a network of non-profits, local businesses, and community stakeholders, we work to enable financial stability for every person in Whatcom County.

We fund 20+ local non-profit programs working to tackle the issue of financial stability from a variety of angles:

BASIC NEEDS:
- food security
- stable, attainable, affordable housing
- healthcare access

ECONOMIC MOBILITY:
- financial literacy training
- vocational readiness training
-adult education programs

BREAKING THE CYCLE OF POVERTY:
- affordable childcare and early learning programs
- academic programs to increase student attendance and achievement
- parenting support
- addiction treatment and recovery
- abuse prevention

United Way is the largest non-profit in America and each United Way plays an important role in building a stronger nation for us all.

United Way of Whatcom County is in a very strong and unique position to lead the charge in changing community conditions. We bridge the private sector, public sector, and non-profit sector. We currently have:
•6 permanent and highly dedicated staff members
•50 member volunteer Community Impact Panel to oversee our Community Impact Fund and ensure it is being invested in programs that are advancing Education, Income, and Health
•20+ Non-Profit Partner Agencies
•100+ participating work-places in our annual campaign
•100+ volunteers who help run their work-place campaigns

We collaborate with local nonprofits and funders to support critical work and services in Whatcom County. We support local school districts and child care organizations to support early learning programs. Working closely with our local hospital and health department we have been part of community-wide assessments to dig deeper in to the issues affecting all of us in Whatcom County. We are also part of the greater network of the United Way system, working closely with our statewide United Way organization and attending webinars and conference sessions with a variety of individuals from United Way Worldwide. This network builds our skills, strengthens our knowledge and helps us build a stronger community.

Each year our support and collaborations directly affect 50,000+ people in our community and the effects ripple out to touch all of us. Recent outcomes during the 2018-2019 fiscal year include:

- 398 individuals and families achieved safe, stable, and affordable housing
- 8,323 people achieved healthier lifestyles through exercise, nutrition, and overall better life choices
- 2,390 youth increased their academic success, improved their grades and were put on track to graduate from high school
- 1,873 kids gained crucial early learning skills and became prepared for school
- 34,902 individuals received food, necessities, or vocational skills to offset their monthly bills or increase their income
- 4,503 individuals received supports to better access healthcare services
- 2,154 parents and children received supports to build strong families
- 6,539 individuals and families received support to recover from or prevent violence or abuse

Financials

UNITED WAY OF WHATCOM COUNTY
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

UNITED WAY OF WHATCOM COUNTY

Board of directors
as of 8/11/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Kara Irvin

US Bank

Term: 2021 -

Tony Bon

Community Volunteer

Patricia Boteler

Samson Rope

Lindsey Cerise

BP Cherry Point

Gurpreet Dhillon

PeaceHealth

Kara Irvin

US Bank

Jeremy Jordan

Samson Rope

Cezar Mesquita

Western Washington University

Heather Milligan

Phillips 66

Andy Thom

Industrial Credit Union

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 08/11/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.