SOCIETY OF ST VINCENT DE PAUL COUNCIL OF Seattle/King County

We'll Be There.

aka St. Vincent de Paul of Seattle/King County, SVDP   |   Seattle, WA   |  https://www.svdpseattle.org

Mission

Compelled to action by the convictions of our founders, St. Vincent de Paul of Seattle|King County joins the community to listen, engage, and build relationships that assist and advocate for individuals and families to meet basic needs and achieve stability and self-sufficiency.

Ruling year info

2019

Executive Director

Ms. Mirya Munoz-Roach

Main address

5950 4TH Ave S

Seattle, WA 98108 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-0583891

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Housing Expense Reduction Support, Rent Assistance (L82)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Society of St. Vincent de Paul Seattle-King County (SVdP) has provided basic needs and survival assistance to millions of families and individuals in neighborhoods throughout the county since 1920. The 2016 American Communities Survey found 2,079,550 people reside in King County and 10.7% of them, more than 222,500, live under the Federal poverty threshold; 11,643 people are experiencing homelessness, according to King County’s 2017 Point in Time count. Already burdened by poverty, race and ethnicity also impose disproportionate impacts on these populations. SVdP provides access to healthy foods, clothing, emergency financial assistance, and other services for people who are most vulnerable and possess high personal and social barriers. SVdP programs and services particularly care for people who are homeless, low income, recently incarcerated, veterans, and seniors. Centro Rendu, a program of SVdP, exists to protect, defend and empower Latino families.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Basic Needs Assistance and Local Outreach by Vincentian Volunteers

Basic Needs Assistance Program. 53 all-volunteer St. Vincent de Paul groups make home visits to prevent eviction, hunger, utility shut-off and related needs facing neighbors in need.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

Centro Rendu of St. Vincent de Paul exists to create support systems for Hispanic immigrant families through education, leadership development and opportunities that promote and strengthen healthier communities and future generations.

Population(s) Served
Families
Infants and toddlers
Adults
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

SVdP Social Service Case Managers and Parish Advocates Case Managers collaboratively assess, plan, implement, coordinate, monitor, and evaluate the options and services required to meet our neighbor’s health and human services needs. Our services are characterized by advocacy, communication, resource management to promote quality and cost-effective interventions and outcomes to neighbors who have received a home visit from one of our 53 Catholic Parish Conferences.
SVdP Case Managers meet with clients in the community at multiple locations and at offices at four of SVDP's five thrift stores: Seattle, Burien, Renton, Kenmore and Kent. We have offices at the local Catholic Parishes and in our SVdP's Georgetown Food Bank and Community Center.
SVdP Case Managers use a person/family centered approach when conducting one of the two Community-based case management models: Standard Case Management and Assertive Community Treatment. Given the population we work with, our focus is to improve housing stability, meet basic needs, reduce substance use, and remove employment barriers for our diverse neighbors.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

The Food Bank seeks to increase access to healthy foods for people at the greatest risk of food insecurity, with a focus upon people who are homeless, low-income people of color, and seniors. In response to growing demand, SVdP expanded the food bank’s days and hours of operation, from three days a week to four and with longer hours for homeless clients on Fridays. The food bank provides fruits, vegetables, staples, cereals, meats, dairy products and hygiene items such as diapers to approximately 1,300 low income people each week; with over 60,000 unique visits each year. The GFB is a point of access for not only healthy foods, but also free clothing, health assessments, hygiene kits for homeless individuals, benefits access and case management. SVdP’s strategy is to meet clients’ immediate needs in one location. King County Medical Reserve Corps nurses provide free blood pressure checks, flu shots, diabetes assessments, and make referrals.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of eligible clients who report having access to an adequate array of services and supports

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Unemployed people

Related Program

Basic Needs Assistance and Local Outreach by Vincentian Volunteers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric represents the aggregated total of services delivered by SVDP Seattle/King County in the years specified.

Number of families assisted with rent or mortgage to avoid eviction

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Basic Needs Assistance and Local Outreach by Vincentian Volunteers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric represents the number of households the SVDP Seattle/King County helped avoid evictions and homelessness by providing rent assistance.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our over-arching goal is to assist individuals in a way that is respectful and compassionate, so they can leave high-risk, unstable living situations and start rebuilding their lives.

We articulated the following goals in our most recent strategic plan:

1. Strengthen and increase the effectiveness of the conferences
2. Expand Fundraising Activities
3. Expand Case Management Capacity
4. Sustain Current Efforts of the Council (Programs, best practices and public awareness)
5. Support Other Council Efforts (Working on housing projects with the Archdiocese of Seattle, capital projects at
current SVdP properties and stores)

Ensure that all of King County is served by a SVDP conference by annually reviewing conference development in parishes, supporting new conferences and growing the reach of established conferences.
Implement a plan to increase Vincentian recruitment, with emphasis on younger and minority members, and evaluate results.

Develop a broader donor base, including corporate donors and Planned Giving, and evaluate results annually.

Expand the number and locations of case managers overall.

Continue to implement programs and services that are performing well and assess performance annually.

Identify & fill needs unable to be met by conferences (medical, translations, jobs) through an annual needs assessment process .

We support over 1,100 volunteer Vincentians through our parish-based Conferences in King County. Vincentians make upwards of 17,400 home visits to people in need each year.

St. Vincent de Paul provides direct services in four locations in King County:
• South Seattle (Georgetown): Food & Clothing Bank, Case Management, Helpline, Direct Assistance Program and Community Connectors Program funded by City of Seattle
• North Seattle (SVdP’s Aurora Community Service Center, located inside the Aurora SVdP thrift store): NeighborCare Health clinic and Case Management.
• Kent: (located inside the Kent SVdP thrift store) Centro Rendu offering Education Programs, Case Management (Family and Youth) and Legal Services
• Renton (located inside the Renton SVdP thrift store): Centro Rendu offering Education Programs Case Management and Leadership opportunities.

At the end of fiscal year 2018, 45,354 households were served by St. Vincent de Paul of Seattle/King County programs and services. In total, SVdP provided people in need with 952,500 pounds of food, $2.3 million in financial assistance, and $2.4 million in “in kind” food, free clothing, and furniture.

During FY 18 Vincentian made 16,707 visits that included home, hospitals, eldercares, prison and other in-person visits. Vincentians provide over $2.4 million in financial and in-kind assistance to help people avoid eviction, get their heat turned back on, and to feed and clothe their families.

Our Case Management program served 241 unduplicated households, delivering a total of 6662 separate instances of service in fiscal year 2018.

Centro Rendu’s all-Latino staff served 1,122 unduplicated individuals in FY 2018.

Next steps include expanding case management to prevent homelessness, expanding SVDP education programs, and adding additional services for Latino families, including workforce development and leadership training.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We are in the process of launching a dedicated resource line for Latinx families with young children based on requests from this community.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people,

Financials

SOCIETY OF ST VINCENT DE PAUL COUNCIL OF Seattle/King County
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

SOCIETY OF ST VINCENT DE PAUL COUNCIL OF Seattle/King County

Board of directors
as of 2/8/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Mary Jo Shannon

Organizer - Retired

Term: 2019 - 2022

Sandra McGowan

Univ. of Wash. Technology Officer--Retired

Adelfa Moreno

Clerk, King County Goverment

Sr. Charlotte VanDyke

Retired CEO--Health Services Provider

Kevin Chan

Microsoft Executive

Ed Sarausad

Go Daddy Executive

Jim Jordan

Retired Elementary School Principal

Mary Kay Snedden

Retired Speech Pathologist & Special Needs Educator

Dennis West

Financial Consultant, Valspresso Investment Management

Dave Cullen

Chief Financial Officer

Betsy Pierce

Mary Sweeney

Harry Oestreich

Tricia Wittman-Todd

Gina Howell

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/08/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/08/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.