United Way of Pierce County

aka UWPC   |   Tacoma, WA   |  http://www.uwpc.org

Mission

United Way of Pierce County works from the heart to united caring people to tackle our community's toughest challenges. Along with our community partners, which include business, government and nonprofits, we are a contributor and a catalyst in the effort to break the cycle of poverty for families living in Pierce County Washington. Our ten year goal is to increase economic self sufficiency for 15,000 families and their children.

Ruling year info

1953

President

Ms. Dona Ponepinto

Main address

PO Box 2215

Tacoma, WA 98401 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-0650669

NTEE code info

Fund Raising Organizations That Cross Categories includes Community Funds/Trusts and Federated Giving Programs) e.g. United Way (T70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our Mission Critical Goal: United, we will lift 15,000 Pierce County households out of poverty by 2028, one family at a time.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Impact

Our annual community campaign provides a significant share of funding for more than 120 local programs from child abuse prevention to food banks to senior services. Funding decisions are made by volunteers, guided by outcome measures developed through annual site visits and tailored to meet community needs which are assessed by grassroots process.

Population(s) Served
Adults

211 is an information and referral center that connects approximately 75,000 people each year via web and phone to agencies that may be able to offer assistance in areas such as rental assistance, food and utility assistance.

Population(s) Served
Adults

United Way coordinates a collaboration of agencies who are experts in the food system supporting low income individuals and families with the purpose of improving the food distribution system.

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

Where we work

Accreditations

2-1-1 AIRS Accreditation 2019

2-1-1 AIRS Accreditation 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of policymakers or candidates reached

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of donations made by board members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We are committed to helping families in crisis today, helping them become self-sufficient tomorrow and advocating for policies that contribute to ensuring the future of a thriving Pierce County.

No single organization can solve poverty. That’s why our unique role as a community convener brings local organizations, schools, businesses, government and philanthropists together around public problem- solving that is people-centered, innovative and scalable --and that addresses the policies, practices and systems around poverty, rather than a single-program approach. When individuals gain stability, families are stronger, our children are more successful and our community thrives.

Our 3-pronged approach incorporates Prevention, Intervention and Empowerment.
-- Create a solid foundation for Basic Needs: By ensuring basic needs like food, health care, childcare and shelter are met, families can move out of crisis, prevent future crisis and toward greater stability.
-- Break down barriers to self-sufficiency: Through early intervention with supportive services through our community partners and South Sound 2-1-1, we connect individuals to resources and provide navigation services for behavioral health, housing, transportation and employment.
-- Build Strong Families: Our Centers for Strong Families provide the education, 1:1 financial coaching and mentoring to help struggling families improve their financial situation and empower them to become self-sufficient.

We have experienced staff that lead our organization and oversee our work in meeting basic needs for 124,000+ people, stabilizing individuals annually through South Sound 211 and overseeing the expansion of our Center for Strong Families partnerships that includes tracking the success of clients, since program inception in 2016.

South Sound 2-1-1 is the only one of its kind in Washington State to provide navigation services. We provide navigation in the areas of behavioral health, housing, workforce development and transportation. In fact, we have received federal funding for transportation navigation since 2016 and in 2019, we were selected along with 23 other United Way organizations to participate in Ride United, a partnership with Lyft to provide transportation for people who have no other means to get to medical, employment or public benefits appointments.

Centers for Strong Families: Since July 2016 seven centers have opened in Pierce County that have served 1,367 clients as of November 2019. 238 people have increased their credit score; 448 people have new or better paying jobs; 605 are enrolled in an education and training program;358 people achieved a financial goal and 335 people were approved for public benefits.

2-1-1 Since 2006 with the start of the Transportation Navigation program we have added four new navigation services for employment, mental health, basic food and housing. Our housing navigators have placed 109 families who were once homeless into housing from January of 2018 through October of 2019. Last year, our transportation services connected 2,926 to a transportation provider

Our third annual poverty summit, from Poverty to Possibilities focused on affordable housing and we broad cross-sectors together to put forth an action plan. Nearly 250 individuals from cross-sectors attended the summit and each year attendance and our profile in the community as a convener has further established our work as a leader in fighting poverty.

Our historic building which we purchased and renovated in 1992, continues to be a model for social enterprise hub in the center of Tacoma by housing seven non-profit tenants at below market rates so they can spend more resources on their missions.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

United Way of Pierce County
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

United Way of Pierce County

Board of directors
as of 5/6/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr Steve Harlow

Bank of America

Term: 2021 - 2022


Board co-chair

Sebrena Chambers

Tacoma Pierce County Health Department

Term: 2021 - 2022

Bill Berry

Tacoma Public Utilities

Elizabeth Bailey

Corner Capital

Linda Nguyen

Matt Levi

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/06/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/06/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.