NORTHWEST HARVEST E M M

aka Northwest Harvest   |   Seattle, WA   |  www.northwestharvest.org

Mission

Vision: Ending hunger in Washington State.

Mission: Leading the fight for hungry people statewide to have access to nutritious food while respecting their dignity and promoting good health.

Ruling year info

1975

CEO

Mr. Thomas Reynolds

Main address

PO Box 12272

Seattle, WA 98102 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-0826037

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Northwest Harvest is Washington’s leading hunger relief agency –supporting a statewide network of 375 food banks, meal programs, and high-need schools. Focused on improving equity in our food system, Northwest Harvest believes everyone in Washington should have consistent access to nutritious food that nourishes the body, mind, and spirit. In addition to making sure those who suffer from hunger have increased access to healthy food, Northwest Harvest aims to shift public opinion, as well as impact institutional policies and societal practices that perpetuate hunger, poverty, and disparities in our state.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Statewide Food Distribution - cash & donated food

Statewide Food Distribution: Last year we distributed over 34 million pounds of food, with fruits and vegetables making up 2/3 of that distribution,  to a statewide network of more than 380 food banks, meal programs and high-needs schools. The agency purchased about one quarter of this food, emphasizing shelf-stable proteins, produce and staples like rice and beans.

Population(s) Served

This schoolchildren's food backpack program provides nutritious take-home meals to at-risk children attending high-need schools in King, Pierce, Grays Harbor, Spokane and Yakima Counties.

Population(s) Served

Our food bank near downtown Seattle serves up to 5,000 people weekly, including our Baby Day and Meals-in-a-Bag Programs. Baby Day (Thursdays) provides families with children through 5 years of  age with baby, toddler and pre-school foods. Meals-in-a-Bag (MWF) distributes take-out lunches for clients needing a meal rather than groceries.

Population(s) Served

This program organizes meetings with food bank clients each year in different regions of the state, to listen to those in need of emergency food; to build awareness of hunger in Washington with the general public, elected officials, food program administrators and hunger advocates; and to develop policy recommendations for fighting hunger.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2012

Charity Navigator 2012

Awards

Community Leader (have received several End Hunger Awards since 2000) 2009

Seattle - Office of the Mayor - End Hunger Awards

Associate's Choice Award 2012

Walmart

World Record for 24-Hour Food Collection 2010

Guinness

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Statewide Food Distribution - cash & donated food

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This includes all the food we distributed statewide plus foods packaged as meals for our children’s programs and all food distributed at our new SODO Community Market, a no-cost grocery in Seattle.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Statewide Food Distribution - cash & donated food

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This estimate is based on the number of infants, children, adults, seniors and households that we and each of our 375 partner programs report having served through the year.

Number of communities served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Statewide Food Distribution - cash & donated food

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We track the number of communities served to monitor the breadth and depth of our statewide reach, and ensure there are no significant gaps in our coverage.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our primary purpose is to distribute a highly nutritious variety of foods that fights hunger and improves the health and well-being of everyone served by the food bank system in Washington. In FY2014, we plan to distribute 28 million pounds of food to more than 360 partner food banks, meal programs and high-need schools that altogether, assist over a million people every year throughout Washington State. Based on the Northwest Harvest (NWH) strategic plan for fiscal years 2014-2016, our goals for the next three years prioritize significant change in the areas listed below, while continuing to focus on our core business: distributing food and fighting hunger.

1. Statewide Engagement: Engage the community in order to broaden and deepen statewide presence, and better serve the entire state of Washington.
2. Greater Capacity: Work collaboratively to enhance the capacity and infrastructure of the hunger response system in Washington.
3. Grower Relationships: Expand partnerships with food producers to increase the flow of nutritious food.

1. Statewide Engagement: Increase statewide engagement in the fight against hunger.
• Assess NWH services and identify opportunities in distribution, community engagement, partner programs, and donor outreach.
• Raise the awareness of hunger and the role of NWH and our network in fighting it statewide.
• Strengthen Western WA relationships with volunteers and donors for continued sustainability.
• Expand volunteer engagement opportunities in Yakima and Spokane.
• Recruit additional board members from Eastern/Central WA.
• Increase donor engagement in Eastern/Central WA.
• Develop statewide recognition plan for donors, volunteers and other partners.

2. Greater Capacity: Support the statewide hunger response system by addressing capacity needs.
• Analyze the current capacity of the hunger response system in Washington.
• Identify and prioritize capacity-building needs for NWH and our program partners.
• Develop a strategy to secure the necessary resources.
• Engage both our network and our funding partners in infrastructure building, based on documented need.

3. Grower Relationships: Ensure nutritious food reaches our neighbors in need.
• Engage at least three new major growers to donate produce.
• Develop an Eastern WA Advisory Committee.
• Work with partners to increase sourcing and distribution of food.
• Cultivate relationships with out-of-state and regional food producers.
• Explore new options for food purchasing.

Northwest Harvest is capable of progressing toward our long terms goals because our agency"

• is the only statewide nonprofit food distributor, with warehouse facilities and fleet in coastal, western, central and eastern Washington.
• is able to take advantage of regional diversity and harvest seasons, and understand regional hunger relief issues.
• partners with a network of more than 360 partner food banks, meal programs, and high-need schools, plus 15 other regional food distributors throughout Washington.
• has broad coverage that reaches food banks in isolated communities and regions of our state that are otherwise underserved.
• provides food to all who present themselves in need and therefore, even in well-served communities, we reach people unable to access food or meals due to lack of documentation or other restrictions.
• has a highly engaged Board of Directors, dedicated staff, and a continually growing Volunteer Program that in FY2013 donated over 111,000 hours to us, 20% more hours than the previous year.
• was founded in 1967, and therefore has decades of experience understanding and promoting food bank nutrition.
• purchases much more food proportionally than other Washington food bank distributors, giving us more flexibility to meet changing needs and maintain high nutritional standards.

As we are just starting our Fiscal Year 2014, here are several recent examples of our accomplishments from FY 2013:

1. Despite six years of unusually great need, we are working with more partner agencies, and serving more people than ever before. We track the number of people served by counting the number of services to people from food banks and meal programs in our network. Prior to the recession, our network provided an average of about 500,000 such services every month. Today we are serving many more clients in need. During the previous 12 months, the average number of services to people by in our network has ranged from 664,000 per month (July-Sept 2012) to 733,000 per month (Nov 2012-Jan 2013). With many publicly supported nutritious programs suffering budget cuts, we expect to continue serving high numbers of people.

2. NWH has always emphasized nutrition but a healthy variety of food is ever more important when so many families are relying heavily on the hunger relief system for daily meals. We are also responding to widespread concern over high rates of obesity, diabetes, and other diet-related illness, plus recognition that many low-income neighborhoods and remote rural areas are “food deserts” with limit access to nutritious groceries. In response to numerous client and partner agency requests, we aim to distribute more fruits and vegetables and especially the fresh produce that is expensive but essential for good health. On average we aim for fruits and vegetables to make up 60% of our total distribution (this past year, 61% or 16.2 million pounds). Protein, equally important, is also expensive and scarce on food bank shelves. This past year we distributed over 2 million pounds, with the majority consisting of lean, healthy protein like fish, chicken or turkey, and dry beans.

3. Volunteers are the heart of NWH. Our Volunteer Program has more than doubled since the recession began, from 46,000 hours in 2008 to 110, 700 in 2013. This is equivalent to an additional 53 full-time employees, a significant addition to a statewide staff of 64. Volunteerism is up across all of our locations: at our warehouses in Kent, Spokane and Yakima, and at Cherry Street Food Bank, as well as volunteer assistance with office help, special events and our Speakers Bureau.

Financials

NORTHWEST HARVEST E M M
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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NORTHWEST HARVEST E M M

Board of directors
as of 11/4/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Diana Axness

Community Volunteer


Board co-chair

Kathy Brown

Sterling Bank

Term: 2011 - 2013

Dan Harkins

Triple H Development LLC

Irene Ward

Catholic Community Services of Western Washington

James Halfaker

Sr. Development Consultant

Kathy Brown

Sterling Bank

Diana Axness

The Boeing Company

Dick Grader

National Frozen Foods

SaSa Kirkpatrick

Community Volunteer

Mindy Kornberg

University of Washington

Kay Bassett

Heritage University, Toppenish

Eileen Takeuchi

eFinancial

Mike Hargreaves

Stadium Thriftway

Naomi Lule

First Fruits Marketing of Washington

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/04/2019

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not Transgender (Cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/04/2019

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.