Human Services

Hopelink

Redmond, WA   |  https://www.hopelink.org/

Mission

Hopelink's mission is to promote self-sufficiency for all members of our community; we help people make lasting change.

Ruling year info

1977

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Lauren Thomas

Chief Operations Officer

Mr. Geoff Crump

Main address

PO Box 3577

Redmond, WA 98073 USA

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EIN

91-0982116

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Since 1971, Hopelink has taken the lead in tackling the issues that prevent low-income families and individuals in north and east King County, WA from achieving stability and gaining the tools and skills they need to exit poverty. With a focus on lasting solutions, our unique approach to change addresses multiple needs that face individuals and families; weaving a tapestry of support that begins with the essential needs of food, shelter, heat and access to healthcare, and continues the journey from poverty through adult education, help finding a job, transportation, family development, and financial capability.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food Assistance

When a family doesn't have enough food, stability in other areas is impossible. Hopelink’s Food Assistance program offers a safe and welcoming environment where clients can obtain fresh, healthy food – including fresh produce, bread, soup, pasta, peanut butter, rice, canned fruits and vegetables, beans, tuna, and refrigerated dairy items. Once registered, clients may visit one of Hopelink’s five food banks twice a month. The amount of food received is based on family size.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Emergency Family Shelter:
 Hopelink’s Kenmore and Redmond shelters provide a short-term home for families in crisis. With a goal of finding stable, permanent housing, families in the Kenmore and Redmond shelters are able to stay on a month-to-month basis. Transitional & Long-Term Housing: Hopelink’s transitional and long-term housing programs in Bellevue, Bothell, Duvall, and Redmond include comprehensive support to help families move from crisis to stability. Transitional housing units provide a secure home for up to two years. Families in long-term housing are able to stay longer, as long as they meet their lease requirements.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

The goal of Hopelink’s energy program is to keep members of our community safe and warm, and to contribute to a stable home environment. We believe a household should never have to choose between heat and electricity or other necessities, such as food, health care, or shelter. Energy assistance funds enable our community members to devote their resources to other crucial expenses.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

When a family is in danger of losing its home in a crisis, Hopelink offers a program that can help to provide a portion of the funds needed to prevent eviction. Preventing homelessness costs at least five times less than helping a family regain stable housing after it is lost. Hopelink can help pay rent during a time of financial need. If a family is experiencing a short-term financial crisis due to unexpected expenses – such as medical bills, auto repair, or loss of income – Hopelink may be able to help pay one month’s rent so that the family can stay in their home.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Hopelink Transportation includes three programs: DART Transit, Medicaid Transportation, and Mobility Management. Hopelink provides public DART Transit through a contract with King County Metro. DART offers bus routes in some neighborhoods using mini buses that can go off regular routes to pick up and drop off passengers. DART operates on a fixed schedule, but one that has more flexibility than regular Metro Transit buses. Hopelink also provides Non-Emergency Medical Transportation in King and Snohomish counties for medical services covered by Medicaid. Hopelink’s Mobility Management team provides education and resources through three travel training programs in King County: Travel Ambassadors, Mobilize! Public Transit Orientation, and Getting Around Puget Sound (GAPS).

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Hopelink’s Employment Services program provides resources, tools, and individual coaching during the job search process. Whether a client is hoping to get back into the workforce or are contemplating a career change, Employment Specialists can help identify interests and skills and guide in developing a successful career path. An Employment Specialist also helps a client develop a high-quality resume and cover letter, as well as practice job interviews. Clients learn job search strategies, including how to network as a way of uncovering the hidden job market.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Hopelink Adult Education classes equip adults with the skills they need to succeed in school, find a job, achieve life goals, and thrive in our community. Classes prepare immigrants and refugees for the U.S. workplace and prepare people who did not graduate from high school to earn a GED or high school diploma.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Worrying about money can affect every part of our clients’ lives; adding stress and keeping them from moving ahead. Hopelink’s Financial Literacy program provides tools and services to help clients attain financial stability. Program options include: Meeting one-on-one with a trusted financial coach who cares about helping clients achieve their goals. Attending any of a number of workshops on such topics as budgeting, credit, banking, risk management and planning for times of financial uncertainty and hardship. Referral to additional online resources or other group workshops.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Hopelink’s Family Development Program helps struggling families create a long-term, step-by-step plan of action for the future. Working one-on-one with a Case Manager, family members discover their unique strengths, set goals, and work toward those goals. Families tailor their action plans to their unique needs, and these plans may include such areas as education, employment, health, housing stability, parenting, and financial management. Case Managers also are connected to many local resources and will offer referrals and advocate for families when necessary.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of unduplicated individuals served in our Food Assistance program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related Program

Food Assistance

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the count of individuals who received food from our food banks or our emergency food bags.

Number of unduplicated individuals served in all housing programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related Program

Housing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the count of individuals who lived in our housing and received 5,248 case management hours.

Number of unduplicated individuals served in all adult education programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related Program

Adult Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the count of individuals who took our GED or EFW programs.

Number of unduplicated individuals served in our Employment program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related Program

Employment Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the count of individuals who were counseled in our Employment program. There were 118 job placements.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Hopelink's mission is to promote self-sufficiency for all members of our community; we help people make lasting change. Our vision is a community free of poverty.

Hopelink's Theory of Change demonstrates the goals and objectives of our services within the community.<br/><br/>Hopelink addresses basic needs—such as food and shelter—in order to help people in crisis attain stability, while also ensuring that those at risk of losing stability have the support they need to remain secure. For families and individuals in crisis, eliminating the stresses of homelessness and hunger is an essential first step in easing the sometimes debilitating effects of poverty; enabling family members to focus on the next steps required to exit poverty. For those at risk of hunger or homelessness during times of financial hardship, providing for basic needs can prevent families and individuals from falling into crisis.<br/><br/>Hopelink helps clients acquire the tools, skills and knowledge that will help them exit poverty and permanently change their lives. Because those who turn to Hopelink for help are not earning a living wage (the amount of income necessary in order to live without any financial assistance), Hopelink programs are geared toward helping clients exit poverty by focusing on increasing their income, improving their employment potential, maintaining stable housing, and advancing their education.

Since 1971, Hopelink has established itself as a leader in tackling issues that prevent low-income families and individuals from achieving stability and gaining the tools and skills they need to exit poverty. The needs of the individuals we serve are often complicated, and our programs continually evolve to help address them. Our experience has taught us that there are no simple answers for ending poverty in our community - it requires a multi-faceted, coordinated approach and a focus on the key issues that affect each family with whom we work. We have helped more than one million people. Our region is diverse in culture, in faith, in geography and in opportunity. Hopelink is committed to being not only a service-provider for the marginalized communities in our region, but a staunch advocate to stand alongside and fight to close the opportunity gap. We demonstrate our commitment everyday by the services we offer and the causes for which we advocate.

Our results are backed-up by a complex data-collection system. Hopelink has a Client Data team that is dedicated to ensuring that our data collection, evaluation and analysis is efficient, effective, and secure. Through our annual Impact Report, quarterly dashboards and semi-annual agency data report, we are tracking our results both operationally and at the impact level. We utilize data to drive our decisions and improve our program offerings. Participant data is stored in a cloud-based system called Clienttrack.

Hopelink serves over 64,000 people annually through our transportation programs and our community services. We served over 20,000 in our stability programs and over 1,800 in our equipped to exit poverty. In 2019, from our stability programs:  Our Food Assistance program served 15,436 unduplicated individuals from 7,035 households with 2,359,458 meals.  Hopelink housed 483 people from 135 households.  88% of the exited households moved into more stable housing.  93% of shelter residents exited to more stable housing.  Hopelink provided 1,803 individuals from 1,041 families with $549,859 in total financial assistance.  8,634 individuals from 3,789 households stayed warm with $2,691,370 in energy assistance. In our longer-term programs designed to equip clients with the skills to exit poverty:  Adult Education taught 347 students in either our GED study and prep course or our job-focused English For Work class.  Our Employment program served 246 clients for whom there were  118 job placements and  86 clients received one or more job placements.  62 economically vulnerable clients received a total of 164 hours of Financial Coaching through our Financial Capability program.

Financials

Hopelink
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Hopelink

Board of directors
as of 2/27/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Geoff Deane

unknown


Board co-chair

Andrew Magill

Geoff Deane

N/A

Angela Birney

Andrew Magill

Terry Lukens

Chere Bautista

N/A

Racheal Chhong

N/A

Manka Dhingra

N/A

Cindy Dodge

N/A

Barbara El Naby

N/A

Chris Gehrke

N/A

Paul Graves

N/A

Doris McConnell

N/A

Jesse Navarro

N/A

Hortensia Nunez

N/A

Jesse Navarro

N/A

Hortensia Nunez

N/A

Tana Senn

N/A

Nickhath Sheriff

N/A

Byron Shutz

N/A

Vandana Slatter

Penny Sweet

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Keywords

poverty, hunger, homeless, food, shelter, housing, transportation, family, families, literacy, self-sufficiency, eviction prevention, financial assistance, adult education, energy assistance