Children's Alliance

A Voice for Washington's Children, Youth & Families

Seattle, WA   |  www.childrensalliance.org

Mission

The Children's Alliance mission is to improve the well being of children by effecting positive changes in public policies, priorities, and programs. Please visit www.childrensalliance.org

Ruling year info

1977

Executive Director

Dr. Stephan Blanford

Main address

113 Cherry St, Box 87190

Seattle, WA 98104 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-0982879

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (P01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (E01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (K01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Statewide Advocacy

The Children's Alliance is a a statewide advocacy organization with 128 organizational and more than 6,500 individual members. We bring the power of all these voices together to advocate for children in Olympia, organize and train child advocates, and expand programs that help children. The Children's Alliance also acts as a watchdog for programs and policies that impact kids, raising public awareness through the media and promoting change through the legislature and other state policy makers.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Learning begins at birth. Every experience children have, from their earliest months, shapes the basic structure of their brains.

Our goal is to create an early learning system in Washington that supports families by making sure they have high-quality options for their children’s early care and learning—whether their children spend their days at home, in formal child care, or with family and friends.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Every child should have health coverage. As a state we’ve made tremendous progress. In early 2007 Governor Gregoire signed the Cover All Kids law. It phases in comprehensive health insurance options under the umbrella of Apple Health for Kids.

The Children’s Alliance and our partners in the Health Coalition for Children and Youth are working every step of the way to make sure the Cover All Kids law fulfills its promise. We’ll continue to pursue policies that will create equal access to care for all children in Washington State.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

A Partnership between Children's Alliance and Washington State Budget & Policy Center - kidscountwa.org

We gather and analyze the best emerging data on how kids are doing in our state, then turn that information into action on issues like poverty, hunger, health care, and education.

Too often, the data points to an alarming truth echoed by parents, teachers and other leaders in communities of color: Washington isn’t a place where every child has an equal chance to thrive.

Information is power. Equipped with facts, people can make a huge difference. That’s why we seek a dialogue between what the data says and what communities know about kids – a dialogue particularly about the disparate life prospects for kids in diverse communities.

By pairing hard data with personal stories, we can give policymakers and the public the knowledge they need to remove the barriers kids face to brighter, freer, more equal futures

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Other programmatic activities include child nutrition, community outreach and training; smaller child focused programs with varying emphases year to year

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Because a key organizational value is that we advocate WITH the children, families and communities that we support, and not FOR them, we value and prioritize authentic involvement in all of our agenda setting and engagement with policymakers. This means that we work to identify parents and community members who represent their communities and prepare them to engage with legislators and policymakers and we amplify their voices through our communications and mobilization activities. We annually survey our more than 6,000 individual and organizational members to understand the challenges that they face, which then become our legislative agenda. We are guided by a Public Policy Council, which consists of experts and practitioners as well as people with lived experience.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We advocated in the state legislature and amongst administrative agencies for sustained opportunities for online testimony during legislative and administrative hearings. This practice eliminates barriers for low income and underrepresented people to participate in the policymaking processes that directly affect their lives and those of community members.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    They are much more likely to provide authentic feedback when our members and communities know what we learn and what we're going to do with their feedback.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Children's Alliance
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Children's Alliance

Board of directors
as of 10/21/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sarah Alexander

Community Volunteer

Term: 2021 - 2023

Sarah Alexander

Community Member

Stephanie Thorpe

King County

Anne Gienapp

King County Metro

Sheely Mauck

School's Out Washington

Emily Van Dyke

Community Member

Heather Gingerich

College Spark Washington

Minu Ranna-Stewart

Puget Sound ESD

Bruce Lamb

Highline College

Sherri Wolson

Community Member

Trevor Greene

Yakima School District

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/21/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/26/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.