Parent Trust for Washington Children

Babies Can't Wait. Kids Can't Wait. Families Can't Wait.

aka Parent Trust   |   Seattle, WA   |  http://www.parenttrust.org

Mission

Parent Trust for Washington Children is a child abuse prevention agency. We create lasting change and hope for the future by promoting safe, healthy families and communities. We work to end the generational cycle of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). We specialize in reaching parents recovering from substance addiction, parents with low income, and parents who lived through child abuse and neglect as children. We create strong families and keep kids out of foster care. We work with parents to keep stress and adversity from becoming tragedy.

Notes from the nonprofit

Over and over, studies show that children who experience Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) are more likely to suffer from life-long mental and physical health problems, problems with drug addiction, homelessness, and early death. And they are more likely to transmit their own ACEs to their children. ACEs research also points us to the answer – parent education and support. Researchers have identified five Protective Factors – parent knowledge of child development, family bonding, positive parenting skills, stress management, and decreasing isolation – that change everything. Increasing these factors changes the parent-child dynamic in a way that gives kids more resilience in the face of pre-existing ACEs – and prevents further abuse and neglect. Parent Trust's research-based programs focus on ending the generational transmission of ACEs. Your investment in ACE prevention has the power to change the world!

Ruling year info

1979

Executive Director

Linda McDaniels MSW

State Parent Program Manager

Sarah Mace

Main address

2200 Rainier Avenue South

Seattle, WA 98144 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Parents Anonymous Washington State

EIN

91-1036940

NTEE code info

Family Services (P40)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Personal Social Services (P50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

80,000 Babies are born every year in Washington state. 1.5 million children live here. Parent Trust is a statewide nonprofit dedicated to ensuring that every parent has the knowledge and skills they need to raise healthy, thriving children. Last year, there were more than 49,000 investigations into child abuse and neglect in Washington. Together we can change that. Our research-based programs prevent child abuse and neglect while ending the generational cycle of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). We help families build better futures – and keep kids out of foster care. Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) in the United States result in more than $100 billion dollars in yearly medical and service costs. ACEs significantly increase a person’s risk of health, social, and economic problems throughout their lives. And there is no way to measure the suffering of each child, either in the moment, or across their lives. ACE Prevention has the power to change the world.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Parent Trust for Washington Children

Parent Trust’s research-based programs train parents how to bond with their children from birth, learn positive parenting skills, create safe family environments conducive to school success, and develop positive social support networks. Through our SMART (Stress Management and Relaxation Training), Family Help Line, Great Starts, Conscious Fathering, and Circle of Parents® programs, more than 15,000 family members receive services each year from Parent Trust. While these programs are open to all Washington families, we focus on high-risk, underserved families with a variety of risk factors that include poverty, mental illness, single and teen parenthood, drug and/or alcohol addiction, social isolation, and histories of family violence.

We passionately believe that parents do not intend to be abusive and/neglectful. Many parents lack resources, education, and support – and when under stress many cannot break the behavior patterns that were ingrained during their own childhoods.

Population(s) Served
Family relationships
Social and economic status
Age groups

Where we work

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Parent Trust for Washington Children
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Parent Trust for Washington Children

Board of directors
as of 1/13/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. John Wittgenstein

KPMG US

Term: 2021 - 2022

John Curley

John Curley Auctions

Dorothy Miller

Merck

Will Cheung

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Blythe Keller

Aetna

Kate Hinley

Community Volunteer

Konrad Miernowski

Lasher Holzapfel Sperry & Ebberson

Rachel Mikulec

Matrix Medical Network

Andrew Repanich

King County

Craig Braugg

Emerald Investment Group

Demarcus Luckett

KMPG US

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/18/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data