PLATINUM2023

FISH OF VANCOUVER

Feeding Families, Nourishing Children

Vancouver, WA   |  www.fishvancouver.org

Mission

Driven by compassion, dignity, and respect, and empowered by committed volunteers, we are a nonprofit organization that provides nutritious food for community members in need.

Ruling year info

1982

President, Board of Directors

Katlin Smith

Treasurer

Alice Davies

Main address

906 Harney St

Vancouver, WA 98660 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-1166344

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Food Insecurity in Clark County is a significant problem. According to Feeding America, just over 66,000 residents in Clark County have food insecurity. When children are considered alone, the percent of children who experience food insecurity jumps to nearly 1 in 4 children in our county (24.1%). Within a three-mile radius around FISH of Vancouver's Harney Street location, three of the public elementary schools have more than 85% of children on free and reduced lunch, an indication of the poverty level of the area FISH services. And the need is growing as Vancouver's housing costs skyrocket, forcing families and individuals to cut their food budgets. As one of the more than 40 partner agencies of the Clark County Food Bank, FISH of Vancouver is in a unique location to help hungry families in our community. Recently have seen a growing need for food in county areas with no grocery stores or pantries - high need to deliver food to these "food deserts".

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency Food Distribution

FISH distributes food, diapers and toiletries to families and individuals who are food insecure. FISH serves approximately 3,000 households per month and distributes more than 1.5 million pounds of food per year to people in need. Besides our "brick and mortar" pantry, we have a mobile pantry that delivers food to underserved populations who might not be able to drive to us - senior housing, and low income housing and medical clinics.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people
Retired people
Unemployed people
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children 0-18 receiving emergency food

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency Food Distribution

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Numbers include duplicated individuals who can access the food pantry weekly.

Number of elderly receiving emergency food

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Years are divided by July-June statistical years. Numbers include duplicated individuals who can access the food pantry weekly. Note: 2021 is estimate and will not be exact until end of June 2022.

Total number of people receiving emergency food

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency Food Distribution

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Since Covid and the decrease in SNAP benefits (food stamps), our client numbers have nearly doubled and are increasing every month.

Total Pounds of Food Distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency Food Distribution

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total Households Served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency Food Distribution

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Includes duplicated households, meaning people who come in weekly (for produce) as well as monthly (for staples).

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our Strategic Goals, as outlined in our 2022-2024 Strategic Plan are:
Goal 1: Maintain a facility that is safe, stable, accessible, and innovative for effective food distribution.
Goal 2: Enhance operations, systems, and programs to ensure they remain responsive to evolving client and community needs.
Goal 3: Professionalize fundraising strategies to sustain success and support a long-term vision for financial health.
Goal 4: Strategically cultivate and steward relationships, leadership, and initiatives to maximize community impact in addressing root causes of hunger for a food secure tomorrow.

1. Strengthen our core food distribution programs to maintain standards of quality, provide a choice-centered client experience and expand our geographic reach through strategic partnerships.
2. Diversify and expand our revenue streams to Invest in management and operations to support the steady growth of FISH.
3. Expand our management and support for volunteer recruitment, training, supervision, and appreciation.
4. Continue our ongoing and integrated communications campaign to build awareness of FISH and issues around poverty and hunger.
5. Facilitate a program planning process with the board, volunteers and community stakeholders to determine potential program and site-based planning.
6. Invest in management and operations training to support the growth of FISH.
7. Begin a mobile pantry program, to deliver food into underserved areas.

FISH has developed and is implementing capabilities in the following ways:
- Hiring of an experienced, professional Executive Director
- Recruitment of a hands on, working Board of Directors including professional expertise in the areas of law, accounting and financial management, human resources, communications, community involvement, building management and public health
- Hiring of an Operations Manager to oversee operations of the FISH pantry and warehouses
- Hiring a Volunteer Coordinator as a professional employee
- Financial stability through purchasing and retiring debt on a 10,000 sq ft commercial building that houses FISH and a commercial tenant
-Purchased mobile food truck, complete w/ refrigerator and freezer, to deliver food into the community.

- Addition of new coolers and freezers for safe food distribution
- Continuation of pick up of food from grocery stores, Clark County Food Bank and other sources
-Began mobile pantry program - take fresh produce and food to low income areas where people may not have access to transportation. Serving an additional 800 individuals per month.
- Implementation of new client data collection system
- Formalization of site tours
- Strengthening of Sustaining Circle program
- Addition of Volunteer Coordinator position and to staff
- Increased recruitment and training of volunteers
- Addition of new Board members
- Continuation and expansion of communication materials including newsletter, expanded website, social media presence
- Use of graphics design studio for web and print materials
- Addition of staff capacity
- Addition of new partners including food distribution to low-income housing projects and low-income medical clinics
- Addition of Business Friends of FISH (BFF) - to provide sustainability through monthly donations of funds and services
- Creation of a facilities reserve fund
- Addition of integrated software program for donor management
- Successful grantwriting for technology, equipment, operations and other funding
- Coordination with Clark Neighbors Food Project and various churches and businesses for food donation drives

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals, We talk to clients daily about what services they need

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded, Multiple interactions w/ clients to see what they need and how we're doing

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

FISH OF VANCOUVER
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

FISH OF VANCOUVER

Board of directors
as of 09/06/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Katlin Smith

UrbanWords Group

Term: 2017 -

Dr. John Greves

Vancouver Clinic

Alice Davies

Retired, Community Volunteer

George Laing

Retired, Clark PUD

Tom Lingo

Alcoa

Betty Sue Morris

Retired, County Commissioner

Bob Durgan

Retired, Construction Administration

Eddie Odoms

Business Owner

Bennett Brandenburg

Attorney at Law

Dr. Beth Lee

Retired, Family Physician

Katlin Smith

Retired, Public Relations Professional

Larry Smith

Retired, Vancouver City Council

Terry Murphy

Interior Design Firm Owner

Sandford Plant

Retired Medical Doctor

Bruce Paris

Retired Banking Executive

Syble Crow

Retired Vancouver Housing Authority, Community Advocate

Debra Bauman

Medical office manager, Community Advocate

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/26/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/26/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.