FLYING HOUSE PRODUCTIONS

aka Seattle Men's Chorus | Seattle Women's Chorus   |   Seattle, WA   |  www.seattlechoruses.org

Mission

Our Mission: Our voices transform society through innovative and entertaining programs that build community, illuminate the experiences of LGBTQ people and their allies, expand inclusion, and inspire justice.

Our Vision: A more harmonious world that celebrates the unique identities and talents of all people.

Ruling year info

1982

Executive Director

Karen J Lane

Artistic Director

Mr. Paul Caldwell

Main address

319 12TH Ave

Seattle, WA 98122 USA

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EIN

91-1183859

NTEE code info

Singing Choral (A6B)

Performing Arts (A60)

Music (A68)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Youth Ticket Outreach Program

Since it began in 1994, Flying House Productions’ highly successful Youth Ticket Program has provided cultural and personal enrichment opportunities for self-identified gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender youth through thousands of donor-sponsored tickets. In addition, we have recently added complimentary motor coach transportation for youth from outlying areas, so they can attend the shows. The bus program, implemented in spring of 2013, started with half a dozen youth. In just one year it has grown to over 70 participants per production.

Because of your generous gifts, youth who face daily discrimination have a place to call home when they attend a chorus concert. For many, it’s a life-changing and positive experience, and it’s an opportunity for us to tell them we love them just the way they are.

Population(s) Served
LGBTQ people

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Chorus America 2014

American Choral Directors Association 2014

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Flying House Productions dba Seattle Men's Chorus & Seattle Women's Chorus. Our mission is to use our voices to transform society through innovative and entertaining programs that build community, illuminate the experiences of LGBTQ+ people and their allies, expand inclusion, and inspire justice.

Our choral performances are full-scale productions that combine the region’s leading professional talents with nationally-known guest artists to create events that expand the possibilities of choral performances and have enormous popular appeal.

We present a five-concert series each season mostly using Benaroya Hall, McCaw Hall, Cornish Playhouse at Seattle Center, and Saint Mark’s Cathedral.

Collaborations with major guest artists from a variety of performance media have included jazz great Diane Schuur, Metropolitan Opera star Tatiana Troyanos, dancer/choreographer Mark Morris, recording artist Marni Nixon, Michael Feinstein, comedian Leslie Jordan, nationally acclaimed a cappella group Chanticleer, Grammy Award winners Bobby McFerrin and Natalie Cole, openly gay country music star Chely Wright, Tony Award-winning playwright and actor Harvey Fierstein, and 1993 Inaugural Poet Dr. Maya Angelou. Other talented performers include Megan Mullally, Kristin Chenoweth, Megan Hilty, Ana Gasteyer, Kathy Najimy, Megan Hilty, Vicci Martinez, and many more.

An active commissioning program has included premieres from some of the leading composers in the world, including Gian Carlo Menotti, John Corigliano, Ned Rorem, Alice Parker, William Hawley, David Conte, Samuel Adler, and David Diamond. In 2011, Seattle Men’s Chorus commissioned For a Look or a Touch, with music by Jake Heggie and libretto by Gene Scheer. Seattle Women’s Chorus recently commissioned a new show by Eric Lane Barnes portraying the lives of all “Rosie the Riveters” in our country, which was performed in February 2014.

Flying House Productions is home to two of the largest community choruses in America: Seattle Men’s Chorus, founded in 1979, which is also the largest gay men’s chorus in the world with over 350 singing members; and Seattle Women’s Chorus, which made its premiere on stage in 2002 and has quickly grown to over 300 singers. Each Chorus currently has a small ensemble of 9 to 11 members each (Captain Smartypants and Sensible Shoes), which further the mission of the organization by performing throughout the Pacific Northwest.

In addition to the 650 singing members, Flying House Productions has a base of over 50 volunteers and associate members who support both Choruses. A leading voice for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community, FHP offers 30 outreach events and mainstage concert performances annually. Concerts, often including nationally-known guest artists along with our region’s professional talents, receive critical acclaim for their combination of high musical quality, wit, and celebration of people of all sexual orientations and identities. Over 30,000 people attend Flying House Production performances each year at Benaroya Hall, McCaw Hall, Cornish Playhouse at the Seattle Center, and Saint Mark’s Cathedral, with thousands more seeing each Chorus in other local performances throughout Washington every year.

Flying House Productions cannot be considered as simply a local arts organization. In addition to the high level of performances it produces, Flying House Productions is also a “voice for acceptance” in the community and across the nation.

Together with the Seattle Symphony, Seattle Men’s Chorus co-hosted the national Chorus America Conference in 1995 in Seattle. Seattle Men’s Chorus hosted a regional convention of Chorus America, the leading national service organization for choruses, in 1990. Artistic director Dennis Coleman served on the National Board of Chorus America for 7 years. Staff has conducted management workshops for community choruses from across the United States and Canada, covering such topics as administration, fundraising, marketing & public relations, ticket management, non-profit tax law, and volunteer management.

In 1993, Seattle Men’s Chorus and local PBS affiliate KCTS joined together for a second time to produce "Swellegant Elegance", a celebration of the music of popular American composer Cole Porter. This Emmy award-winning program was seen in 78 major markets across the country and viewed by an estimated 2.5 million people. Seattle Men’s Chorus’ 1990 Radio Craze telecast on KCTS generated the most pledges and had the second highest ratings of any locally produced show in their history. One out of every six households in Western Washington and British Columbia was tuned in to the broadcast.

Statewide tours are a standard feature of both Seattle Men’s Chorus and Seattle Women’s Chorus performance seasons and have included performances in cities such as Bellingham, Bremerton, Coupeville, Everett, Olympia, Spokane, Tacoma, and Walla Walla.

National tours have included performances in some of the nation’s most prestigious halls including New York’s Carnegie Hall, Avery Fisher Hall and Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center, Symphony Hall in Boston, Meyerson Symphony Hall in Dallas, Davies Symphony Hall in San Francisco, and Boettcher Hall in Denver. More recently, in the summer of 2012 both Choruses toured performed in Denver during the GALA Choruses Festival.

Seattle Men’s Chorus has also toured internationally. In August, 1998, SMC traveled to Europe, where they performed in Barcelona, at the Gay Games’ closing ceremony and two other concerts in Amsterdam, and in London. In March of 2003 SMC traveled to New Zealand and Australia, performing in Auckland, Melbourne, and Sydney, as well as marching in the 25th anniversary of Sydney’s internally renowned Gay Mardi Gras Parade. In June of 2014, SMC toured throughout Germany and participated in the Pride Festival in Berlin.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Members and former members of Seattle Men's Chorus & Seattle Women's Chorus, concert attendees, musicians, dancers, actors, artists, Teen Tix users, chorus students and teachers from Washington Middle School, and their families, and Seattle Choruses YouTube followers. We welcome all people from all socio-economic backgrounds, races, cultures, ethnicities, LGTBQIA+ individuals and their allies. During the pandemic, we offered free music video tickets to the unemployed, first responders, healthcare workers, veterans, and anyone in need.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In September 2020, a group of staff, singers, and Board members embarked on a year-long education project with Of, By, For All Change Network to develop inclusive plans to build relationships and partnerships with individuals and community organizations of interest in our ongoing work to become an anti-racist organization.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Still a work in process.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

FLYING HOUSE PRODUCTIONS
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

FLYING HOUSE PRODUCTIONS

Board of directors
as of 7/14/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Kevin Maifeld

Seattle University

Term: 2019 - 2021

April Cook

Ed Darr

Mitchell Hunter

Zhenya Lavy

Wendy Norcross

Bill Sechter

Brick George

Angela Forsa

Brooks Glenn

James Murtaugh

Gretchen Olsen-Jacobson

Tara Street

Kevin Maifeld

Jackson Cooper

Ron Douglas

Bill Freeberg

Marie Hutchins

Meisha Wangerin

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/14/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person with a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/13/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.