SNOHOMISH COUNTY MUSIC PROJECT

People thriving through music and relationships.

aka Northwest Music Hall   |   Everett, WA   |  https://scmusicproject.org/

Mission

Fostering individual and communal well-being through anti-oppressive and trauma-informed music therapy.

Ruling year info

1984

Executive Director

Vasheti Quiros

Main address

1702 Pacific Avenue

Everett, WA 98201 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Everett Symphony

EIN

91-1204042

NTEE code info

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Arts Service Activities/Organizations (A90)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Music Project seeks to address some of our community’s most complex needs on both individual and systemic levels, using music as an agent for individual coping, relational health, and social change.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Individual Sessions for Mental Wellness

Trauma, loss or mental health challenges can make it difficult to connect with others and cope with the challenges and uncertainties of life. Music therapy is a unique treatment modality that can help you gain self-awareness/insight, reduce anxiety, develop problem-solving skills, build tools for regulating mood, and more. You will work with a board-certified music therapist to create and use music in ways that are personally tailored to your specific needs and goals. No musical experience is required.

Population(s) Served
Adults
People with psychosocial disabilities

Growing older can often lead to increased feelings of isolation and unique physical and emotional challenges. Music therapy is an interactive, orienting, and engaging treatment modality that can help to reduce anxiety and agitation, maintain cognitive skills, reduce the sense of isolation, manage pain, and more! A board-certified music therapist works with clients to create and use music in ways that are personally tailored to their specific needs and goals. No musical experience is required.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
People with psychosocial disabilities

Music therapy is a unique way to build a sense of identity and learn more about yourself. Individual sessions with a music therapist can help individuals develop communication skills, understand and process their feelings, develop a sense of identity, build skills to connect with others, and more. In music therapy, clients learn instruments and music skills, listen to their favorite songs, and create music with a music mentor. No musical experience is required.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adolescents

A music therapist will conduct a consultation with the family member and/or caregiver to discuss ways music can support the client through major transitions including, but not limited to, building new routines, encouraging connections, regulating emotions, and providing a space for relaxation, play, or emotion processing.

Population(s) Served
Caregivers
Families

A safe space where neurodivergent adults (i.e. autistic, ADHD, dyslexic, etc.) can come together and support each other. No music experience needed.

Population(s) Served
Adults
People with disabilities

This support group music therapy model responds to a need for LGBTQ-centered mental health services. Self-disclosures within the Music YoU-BELONG group space indicate that at least 13% of our group members had attempted suicide before joining music therapy, and more than that have self-harmed. LGBTQ youth are in need of ongoing, queer-centered, accessible, and confidential mental-health care now more than ever. We believe that creating safe spaces for all youth to explore and own non-conforming gender and sexuality identities is an inherently anti-colonial act and will continue to approach Music YoU-BELONG as a program in which group members can live into the fullness of all their intersectional identities.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
LGBTQ people

Led by a board-certified music therapist, the PTSD Therapeutic Skills Group is open to veterans and individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Participants will have opportunities to process their trauma and develop healthy coping skills. The group includes music exploration, lyric analysis, and other DBT-related activities.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
People with psychosocial disabilities

Available to anyone! One episode is posted per week on the Music Project’s social media sites and all major podcast platforms. You can listen anywhere podcasts are found. Or, online at Anchor.Fm/TheFeelingIsMusical.

The Music Project uses The Feeling is Musical as a tool for community education about music therapy as an evidence-based practice. The podcast includes discussions that highlight the unique qualities of music therapy, unlike other traditional therapeutic practices. By developing this mutual understanding about music therapy with listeners, The Feeling is Musical creates a cooperative network that expands knowledge of the resources available to people seeking additional support.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of Infants/Toddlers who have received free music therapy.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children who have received free music therapy.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who have received free music therapy.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Vetarans who have received free music therapy.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans

Related Program

PTSD Therapeutic Skills Support Group for Veterans

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of elders who have received free music therapy.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors

Related Program

Individual Sessions for Older Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Music Therapy - To use the power of music to improve physical and mental health and develop pro-social and resiliency skills with evidence-based practices delivered by board certified music therapists.

Music Therapy – A wide breadth of music therapy interventions, techniques, research, and philosophies are used to meet the individual needs of our diverse client population. Working both ono-on-one and in group sessions, our clients work with board-certified music therapists through individually tailored, intentional experiences such as song writing, lyrical analysis, improvisation, and therapeutic drumming. Program activities are focused on developing coping skills, anger management, conflict resolution, reducing aggressive behaviors, improving social relationships, self-expression, reduction of traumatic symptoms, group cohesion, positive self-identity, self-esteem, impulse control, academic performance, and critical thinking and listening skills. The directed use of music and music therapy is highly effective in understanding and expressing feelings, supporting feelings of self-confidence and security, and providing a safe and neutral environment for self-expression. Additionally, because music is seen as a “fun" activity, this form of therapy is often disguised and can be particularly powerful in working with populations that are difficult to connect with otherwise. Music therapy is considered an allied health profession and, as such, music therapists also facilitate helping resistive client's access traditional mental health services.

Music Therapy – Our clients work with board-certified music therapists through individually tailored, intentional experiences like song-writing and lyrical analysis, improvisation, listening, instrument playing, therapeutic drumming, and singing. To address these needs within our community, we work with a variety of community partners encompassing government organizations, other nonprofit organizations and educational institutions. Program partners support program planning and implementation, provide referrals, and/or will host the provision of services at their facilities. The Snohomish County Music Project is currently the only known community-based organization providing evidence-based music therapy interventions delivered by board certified music therapists to vulnerable populations in Snohomish County. Therefore, we are in a unique position to provide music therapy services because of our internal resources and collaborations.

In 2019-20, the Music Project focused on enhancing our connections to achieve success. We know that our team’s relationships and commitment to our clients are key to their wellness. We also know that our connections to our partners and our community are essential to achieving our mission.

The Music Project successfully piloted a new program to strengthen connections between autistic children and their non-autistic parents. Participants benefit from working with a music therapist who shares their autistic identity. The program uses musical play to develop a better understanding of the child’s authentic way of self-expression and affirm their unique neurology.

The Music Project began providing music therapy to parents with active dependency cases and seeking reunification with their infants and toddlers through a partnership with United Way of Snohomish County. In music therapy, the parent bonds with their child through structured music experiences such as lap songs and child-directed play. Requests for music therapy services continued to increase throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Music Project implemented telehealth services for all clients at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. With great emphasis on reaching marginalized communities, the music therapists have provided 257 sessions to individuals and families. Additionally, due to generous community support, 98% of clients received services at no-cost.

In response to the need for connection and emotional support, the Music Project launched a music enrichment program, Music Live, through Facebook. A board certified music therapist facilitates the program with streams every Wednesday. Since its start, the videos have over 3,200 views.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Music therapists responded to feedback from students and therapeutic observations and radically shifted a music therapy model previously developed in 2015 to better align with current student interests and needs. Our music therapists modified goals and approaches from keyboard music instruction and expanded classes to include piano, guitar, ukulele and choir. Student’s motivation appeared to increase significantly when they were given the opportunity to choose from a variety of instruments what they wanted to learn most. These changes provided more opportunity for student input in program development and increased opportunity for social engagement with peers. As a result, we noticed increased signals of student motivation, including higher retention rates.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people,

Financials

SNOHOMISH COUNTY MUSIC PROJECT
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

SNOHOMISH COUNTY MUSIC PROJECT

Board of directors
as of 7/27/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Zachary Hoernlein

Fred Meyer

Term: 2022 - 2021


Board co-chair

Kathleen Goff

Private Voice Instructor

Term: 2021 - 2022

Debbie McBrayer

Pacific Treatment Alternatives

Corey Margolis

Spectra

Jacque Holowaty

Climate Pledge Arena

Amy Sheldon

Tulalip Tribes

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/09/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/18/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.