THE CHILD CARE ACTION COUNCIL OF THURSTON COUNTY

aka Child Care Action Council   |   Olympia, WA   |  www.ccacwa.org

Mission

The mission of Child Care Action Council is to promote and nurture early learning communities where families and children thrive.

Ruling year info

1988

Executive Director

Gary Burris

Main address

3729 Griffin Lane SE

Olympia, WA 98501 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-1373181

NTEE code info

Kindergarten, Nursery Schools, Preschool, Early Admissions (B21)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Raising A Reader

Raising A Reader is an evidence-based early literacy program that helps families of young children (birth through age five) develop, practice, and maintain habits of reading together at home. Our core program model, which both increases access to books and offers support for strengthening the culture of reading at home, is driven by 25 years of research that shows that one of the most significant factors impacting a child’s academic success is being regularly read to by a parent or other primary adult caregiver before starting kindergarten.

Population(s) Served

Free Kaleidoscope Play & Learn group for parents and caregivers with children birth to 5 years of age! Bring your children with you and stay to play, read, sing and have snack together!
This stimulating program is free and offers fun activities that also help young children prepare for success in school and life. Activities include:
Music
Arts and crafts
Storytelling
Block play
And lots of playing!

Population(s) Served

Safe Kids Thurston County is a network of organizations providing injury prevention information, safety devices, activities and events in an effort to empower local communities in preventing accidental injuries in children 0 - 14 years of age.

Population(s) Served

Early Achievers, Washington’s quality rating and improvement system (QRIS), is voluntary for licensed child care providers and helps early learning programs offer high-quality care. Early Achievers:
-Connects families to child care and early learning programs with the help of an easy-to-understand rating system.
-Offers coaching and resources for child care providers to support each child’s learning and development. Research shows this kind of assistance helps providers improve the quality of their programs. And when more young children are ready for school, we all benefit.

Population(s) Served

BLOCK Fest is an interactive exhibit that individuals or groups can reserve through CCAC to create their own special event. It is a proven tool which provides families with young children under the age of 8 with a rich, hands-on math and science learning opportunity.

Population(s) Served

Many families lack a support network because they are new to the area, their network is unhealthy or abusive, or friends and family aren’t in a position to help. For these families, Margie’s Crisis Nursery opens the door to a support network by providing emergency child care during a crisis and guiding families toward long-term solutions.

Population(s) Served

We offer a variety of classes to support child care providers in meeting STARS requirements and professional development goals. Our professional development program includes classes in all of Washington's Core Competency areas, as well as classes to support those working toward a Child Development Associate (CDA) credential. Most classes are $10 per hour and vary in length and location.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of young children enrolled in weekly rotation of Raising A Reader books

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Raising A Reader

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

We partner with child care centers, and recently, organizations operating them have consolidated and changed which represents a dip in numbers. Currently, we are working to create new partnerships.

Number of families participating in in playgroups.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Kaleidoscope Play and Learn Group

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of low-income families with children who received safety equipment.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Safe Kids

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of low-income families with children who received safety equipment.

Number of families participating in the Parents as Teachers home visition program.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of families served. This is a new program which started in 2018.

Number of child care providers receiving Early Achievers coaching support.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Early Achievers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Estimated number of child care centers and family centers we serve throughout the year (estimation because centers open and close throughout the year).

Number of job skills training courses/workshops conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Professional Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of professional development classes held each year for our 6-county service area.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

GOAL 1: Families: Enhance the ability of all families in Clallam, Jefferson, Kitsap, Mason, Grays Harbor, and Thurston Counties to access quality child care and early learning opportunities.

GOAL 2: Build the Professional Development System throughout Clallam, Jefferson, Kitsap, Mason, Grays Harbor, and Thurston Counties.

GOAL 3: Strengthen Organizational Capacity and Infrastructure

GOAL 4: Advocate for systemic changes to support effective child care and early learning program and policies.

Strategy 1A: Reach out to parents and families with innovative ways of connecting them to quality child care, especially underserved populations, including non-English speakers.

Strategy 1B: Help families keep their children safe by promoting child health, safety and prevention of child abuse and neglect.

Strategy 1C: Provide early learning opportunities for families and children to encourage school readiness.

Strategy 1D: Develop and regularly update a comprehensive Family Engagement Plan (with Board approval).

Strategy 2A: Align all professional development and consultation efforts with statewide quality improvement policy and practice initiatives.

Strategy 2B: Develop professional development infrastructure region wide.

Strategy 2C: Offer high quality professional development programs to help providers understand child development and offer safe, enriched learning environments.

Strategy 2D: Provide on-site consultation services as needed and funding allows.

Strategy 2E: Create additional networking opportunities among providers for mentoring and support.

Strategy 2F: Develop and regularly update a comprehensive Professional Development Plan (with Board approval).

Strategy 3A: Maintain strong Board capacity and functions.

Strategy 3B: Resource Development – Diversify and strengthen funding base to assure the long-term sustainability of Child Care Action Council.

Strategy 3C: Develop agency infrastructure throughout six-county region.

Strategy 3D: Strengthen CCAC's data capacity to support service planning, evaluation, and advocacy.

Strategy 4A: Lead and participate in advocacy activities.

Strategy 4B: Maintain current community partnerships and look for additional collaborative opportunities to optimize services and sustain funding.

Strategy 4C: Establish mutual partnerships with local businesses and community leaders.

Strategy 4D: Collaborate with Child Care Aware Washington (state network) to develop and regularly update a comprehensive Annual Advocacy Plan (with Board approval).

Help families keep children safe by promoting child health, safety and prevention of child abuse and
neglect:
-Provide access to crisis child care with regional phone line and contracts with child care facilities for
emergency child care
-Ensure kids are safe by providing Safe Kids information at local fairs and during provider classes;
expanding partnerships and funding opportunitiesProvide early learning opportunities for families and children to support school readiness:
-Early literacy training to parents and providers including rotation home of books and book bags through
Raising a Reader
-Events to connect parents with child care and early learning services, tailoring outreach to under-served
and diverse populations
-Offer parent education and support opportunities by offering Play and Learn groups to promote early
childhood development and stimulating care environments among Family, Friends, and Neighbor caregivers
-Partnering with agencies and coalitions to plan and implement activities promoting early learning,
parent education, and support

Diversify and strengthen funding base to assure the long-term sustainability of CCAC:
-Improve donor cultivation and stewardship
-Develop a strategy for identifying and engaging potential, especially young, donors, improve our social
network capacity
-Solicit and increase contributions from Board and staff
-Foster community building to promote awareness and fund development
-Participate in United Way and Combined Fund Drive campaigns throughout service area
-Seek private and corporate foundation grants to support current programs and enable expansion
-Increase use of social media for messaging
-Engage donors through website

Play & Learn year-end survey, participants reported increased frequency of positive behaviorial
interaction with children as a result of things they learned, including:

-understanding what to expect from children at different ages
-noticing times they could help the child in their care throughout the day
-understanding the relationships between play and school readiness and their role as caregiver in helping
-children be ready for kindergarten
-talking about numbers, shapes and sizes with children

Raising a Reader:

Thirty percent of participating families completed a questionnaire about their literacy activities at home
at the end of the program year:
-89% reported a great likelihood of having a reading routine at home
-Parents also reported their children read more often (87%) and read longer (91%)
-84% of parents indicated they were a little or a lot more interested in reading with their child
-68% of parents said their children asked questions about the books they are reading

Early Educator Training:

-Between 89% to 100% of feedback surveys agreed or strongly agreed: that they had increased their
knowledge and/or skills as a result of attending the workshop; and that they could think of ways to enhance
their work with children and families as a result of attending the workshop
-90% to 100% agreed or strongly agreed that they could apply the information they learned to the
diversity of families they serve

Early Achievers - Quality Improvement:

-74% of providers in the region enrolled
-1476 trainings completed
-93 out of 94 rated level 3 or better (the standard of quality)

Financials

THE CHILD CARE ACTION COUNCIL OF THURSTON COUNTY
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

THE CHILD CARE ACTION COUNCIL OF THURSTON COUNTY

Board of directors
as of 4/30/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Lindsey Bamba

Project Manager

Term: 2019 - 2021

Larry Geri

Evergreen State College Faculty

Lori Bame

Project Manager, Independent Consultant

Lindsey Bamba

Olympia Federal Savings Branch Manager

Christine Schaller

Thurston County Superior Court Judge

Todd Shobert

WA State Employees Credit Union - V.P. of Investments and Insurance

Neil Woody

McSwain and Company

Burcu Bryan

St. Martin's University

Paul Knox

Knoxworks Consulting

Tess Faughn

Timberland Bank

Hannah Mechler

Grays Harbor Community College

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes