PLATINUM2024

WHIDBEY ANIMALS IMPROVEMENT FOUNDATION

WAIF’s Vision is to provide a safe and loving home for every companion animal.

aka WAIF   |   Coupeville, WA   |  www.waifanimals.org

Mission

To protect companion animals, provide compassionate care, advocate for their welfare and positively promote the human-animal connection.

Ruling year info

1995

Executive Director

Cinnamon Hudgins

Main address

PO Box 1108 60 Rhododendron Park Rd

Coupeville, WA 98239 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-1488861

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

WAIF was founded in 1990 to respond to the homeless pet population on Whidbey Island in a humane manner. We practice a life saving philosophy in which no animal in shelter is euthanized for space or time constraints. We serve cats and dogs seeking loving, life-long homes on the island and beyond. We also seek to help low-income pet owners keep their pets by providing assistance with emergency medical needs and spay/neuter surgeries. We also provide pet food banks at several locations on Whidbey Island. Additionally, we have three programs to help reduce the overpopulation of community cats with vouchers with local veterinarians and free monthly spay/neuter surgeries.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Companion Animal Sheltering, Care, and Adoption

We serve as a managed intake animal shelter. We have two animal sheltering contracts on Whidbey Island. One with Island County, the other with the City of Oak Harbor. We take in strays from the public and owner surrenders.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Provides discounted fees for Spay/Neuter surgeries for the pets of low-income pet owners. Services provided local Whidbey Island Veterinary Clinics.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Provides medical assistance to pets of low-income pet owners. This allows the pet to remain in the home rather than be surrendered to a shelter because of inability to pay for needed medical attention.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Similar to Spay/Neuter Coupon program, but specifically for feral/community cats. Provides discounted fees for surgeries for cats that are then returned to the colony they came from.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Provides basic information for keeping children safe around unknown animals, and how to be a responsible pet owner.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Beyond providing services for domestic cats, our animal welfare philosophy extends to protecting the vulnerable cats in our community by providing winter shelters for community cats. Community cats do not fare well being indoors or in a shelter environment. These are provided free of charge to local caretakers of community cats. These shelters are refurbished totes and are fully insulated for protection in the winter months.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Companion Animal Sheltering, Care, and Adoption

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animals euthanized

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Companion Animal Sheltering, Care, and Adoption

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of released animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Companion Animal Sheltering, Care, and Adoption

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of sheltered animals

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Companion Animal Sheltering, Care, and Adoption

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Companion Animal Sheltering, Care, and Adoption

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Prevent A Litter Coupons redeemed (s/n subsidy).

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Spay/Neuter Coupon Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of low income pet owners given medical assistance for their pets.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency Medical Assistance Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

In follow up to our mission, our goal is to maintain a life-saving sheltering environment and to continue the decline in intake of homeless animals through offering an expanded spay/neuter program which will include free surgeries for community/feral cats on Whidbey Island.

Our aim is to have every pet belonging to a loving home.

WAIF continues to educate public outreach with pet safety in mind, responsible pet ownership, emergency preparedness, behavior training, and off-site booths and exhibitions.

WAIF has organized a "Program/Operations" committee made up of volunteers, staff, and board members to address community concerns and opportunities. As space allows, we assist other shelters with our transfer program, and we are curating relationships with animal organizations on how we might be able to help to give animals adoption opportunities.

In addition to our CATsNIP program, we have a program to house community/feral cats on Whidbey Island by providing free tote-sized shelters for those wanting to protect their community cats in their neighborhood humanely. We have also created another program called "Break the Cycle" to spay pregnant cats after they have given birth. The cat will be spayed for free with financial assistance provided by WAIF with local partnerships with participating island veterinarians.

WAIF is also a current member of Washington Federation of Animal Care & Control Agencies (WAFED) and its executive leadership is a member of Pet Alliance of Washington. This group of animal shelter leadership virtually meets monthly to discuss trends, challenges, and solutions for Washington state animal shelters.

WAIF now has a new 12,000 sq. ft. shelter complete with a Spay/Neuter Clinic, that is currently being maintained at half full. Capacity for housing has been greatly enhanced from previous old shelter on County property (formerly a dog pound rather than shelter). Additionally, a separate Annex building has also been constructed on the ten acre property for educational and training needs of animals and people. So, physical capacity for expanded programming on the island is now established.

The challenge is in developing the funding for school-age programming, Spay/Neuter surgeries to community/feral cats, and to expand the number of shelter staff to house additional companion animals in need.

Our on-boarding process requires new animal care employees to get certified in "Fear Free Shelter Program Core Modules."

By national standards, WAIF continues its longstanding "No Kill" status (90%+ Live Release Rate). In 2022, our live release increased to 95.5%. We have been recognized by the National No Kill Advocacy Center as one of only three Washington animal shelters as a "Saving 90 Community."

To help achieve a live release rate above 90%, we have certified dog trainers that assist us with enrichment and training exercises for the dogs. We also invested in new equipment to disinfect dog kennels in accordance to shelter best practices.

In 2022, WAIF saw its single largest intake, in its history, from an animal cruelty case. 54 animals were brought to WAIF in protective custody. All animals suffered from Giardia and were unaltered upon entry. With program support, we were able to medically treat and spay/neuter all animals prior to adoption.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Financials

WHIDBEY ANIMALS IMPROVEMENT FOUNDATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

WHIDBEY ANIMALS IMPROVEMENT FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 04/18/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Nikki Monell

Real Estate/Title

Term: 2018 - 2024

Nikki Monell

Real Estate/Title Co.

David Bieniek

Retired

Joan Shott

Retired

Lindsay Kelley

Banking

Amanda Storm

Hospital Administration

Kelsey Engstrom

Physical Therapy

Steve Martin

Retired

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/15/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/18/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.