WORK FORCE DEVELOPMENT AGENCY A RESOURCE CENTER FOR OUR FUTURE

A Resource Agency for our Future

aka Work Force Development Center (WFDC)   |   Everett, WA   |  www.wfdcenter.org

Mission

To operate as a "Work Force Development Center" that promotes the personal growth and economic independence ‎of high school students and adults living with disabilities and/or employment barriers by providing training programs and ‎employment opportunities.

Ruling year info

1996

CEO

Mr. David Trader

Main address

11400 Airport Road, Suite #100 - None -

Everett, WA 98204 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-1518808

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Specialized Education Institutions/Schools for Visually or Hearing Impaired, Learning Disabled (B28)

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

WFDC is undergoing a rebranding and diversification plan - to expand to industries outside of aerospace and update our online presence.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Manufacturing Vocational Training and Job Placement Program

Students earn as they learn... Through our training program, we have created an educational outlet for over 18 school districts throughout King, Island and Snohomish counties. Students employed as student apprentices receive high school credits for their training as a means of furthering their education. Upon graduating from our program, our students have not only learned valuable technical skills but also an appreciation for what it takes to succeed in today's competitive job market. The Skills we teach: Blueprint reading Inventory control Assembly Riveting Sealing Painting Shipping and Receiving Career Preparation and Resume building

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

WFDC has been teaching life skills, vocational skills, and work ethics throughout the north Puget Sound region in Washington State since 1991. In collaboration with local high schools, transition programs and alternative schools, WFDC promotes economic self-sufficiency and provides experiential education, helping to reengage disillusioned high school students with the education process. WFDC staff and board members are deeply committed to ensuring that each one of our students completes high school and is able to realize his or her aptitude and potential. WFDC empowers some of our most challenged youth to become productive, self-sufficient adults by providing them with vocational and life skills training, along with individualized support and guidance from our dedicated team of staff.

Partner school liaisons from three dozen schools, transition programs and alternative school programs identify and refer prospective participants to WFDC's highly regarded Vocational Training and Apprenticeship Program for many reasons. Referred students may be performing poorly in school, on a self-destructive path of poor choices that could have devastating long-term or even permanent life consequences, or may be teetering on the edge of school dropout. Each student referred to the program receives special support services through his/her school due to diagnosed physical, mental, or learning disabilities and/or other issues with poor grades, attendance, and/or behaviors. Currently, 91% of our trainees are on an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) which is a comprehensive school support plan for students with disabilities developed in conjunction with the student, his/her parent or guardian, school teachers, and support staff. Adherence to the plan is monitored closely by the school. According to our partner school liaisons, WFDC's Vocational Training and Apprenticeship Program is an important part of all of our students' IEPs.

Since 1991, we've helped over 1,300 of our area's most “troubled" youth become respectful, responsible, and productive young adults. WFDC helps youth to learn new vocational and life skills, helping to prevent future poverty, dependence on public welfare, and/or involvement in the criminal justice system. As a result of this program, our students often completely change the trajectory of their lives; they transform their attitudes and behaviors, develop self-confidence and belief in themselves (often for the first time ever), and learn to set and work toward the achievement of goals. For example, in summer 2015, WFDC helped 20 trainees who had recently graduated high school find full time regular employment with local aerospace companies including 8 who are now working at Boeing.

As a social enterprise nonprofit, the vast majority of WFDC's income is earned from our manufacturing business customers through the work performed by our students and staff. WFDC's intensive nine-month training process teaches students how to produce high quality mechanical parts and electrical assemblies supporting the aerospace, automotive, trucking, agricultural, and marine industries as well as Computer Numeric Controlled (CNC) machining. By the time they graduate from our program, students have developed the knowledge, skills, and experience to earn a living wage in the aerospace / manufacturing industry. Listed below are the three primary areas we address through the program:
 VOCATIONAL TRAINING – Vocational skill development means future independence, financial stability, and a sense of hope and stability that many of our students have never known.
 EDUCATION – WFDC helps students in danger of school dropout to stay in school and earn school credits toward their high school diploma, guiding them toward further educational exploration and study as appropriate.
 YOUTH DEVELOPMENT – WFDC employees are positive role models for our students helping them develop self-worth, a sense of accomplishment, work skills, and personal attributes that will make them assets to future employers.
Most of the students referred to the program exhibit multiple risk factors compounding the challenge to help them overcome the barriers to success so they can lead productive and fulfilling lives. The challenges are often extensive, but not insurmountable with individualized guidance and support from our team of instructors and staff. School counselors tell us that for many, WFDC is truly their last hope for a promising future.
WFDC's Vocational Training & Apprenticeship Program operates in two - three-hour daily shifts Monday through Friday during the school year - one from 8 - 11 a.m.; the other from noon - 3 p.m. As capacity builds, we plan to add a third shift from 4 – 7 p.m. We currently have a morning and afternoon class that started in September and another two classes of new trainees that start in February each year. The intensive program begins with 5-6 weeks of classroom instruction. Each student must pass tests on each of the 15 individual modules and a comprehensive test before being allowed on the production floor where they learn how to operate a variety of power tools and equipment and earn minimum wage for their work.
Students learn a wide variety of skills spending three-four weeks on the production floor in each manufacturing area, as well as our CNC Machining shop location less than a mile from our main facility in Mukilteo. The work is highly detailed and students must be extremely precise. Skills developed include both hard (vocational) and soft skills (for employability).

WFDC incorporated into a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in 1991 to build strong transitions between high school and more secure and promising futures for disabled, at-risk, and economically disadvantaged students. The agency began in a rented building located in south Everett with Everett High School being one of our first three partner schools that year.
We've grown and evolved significantly in 29 years because of our reputation with partner schools for getting excellent results with extremely challenging students. In 1996, To date, we've helped over 1,800 of our area's most “troubled" youth become respectful, responsible, and productive young adults. The program is successful with this group of students because they receive intensive instruction and individualized attention from our dedicated team of staff.
Because of this program, the vast majority of our students stay in school and graduate with a high school diploma. Some even go on to pursue higher education after high school, which may not have previously been an option for them. Students that successfully complete our program leave with knowledge, skills, confidence, and work experience necessary to become gainfully employed and self-supporting as they enter adulthood. For most of these kids, this is truly an enormous transformation in a mere 9 - 12 month period of time.

WFDC's Vocational Training and Apprenticeship Program helps to keep at-risk youth in school; preventing them from dropping out increasing the odds they will becoming dependent upon welfare or involved in the criminal justice system. While the youth referred to our program are indeed challenging, they are NOT throwaway kids. With one-on-one training, guidance, high expectations to instill a belief in themselves, these young people can absolutely look forward to promising futures.
The Future of Children is a national research organization (and collaboration between Princeton University and the Brookings Institution) to promote effective policies and programs for children and youth. In a research brief on high school dropouts, the Future of Children discusses the costs of failing to graduate from high school, which “are not limited to dropouts themselves, but also spill over to society. These social costs include lower tax revenues, greater public spending on public assistance and health care, and higher crime rates." Nearly half of single mothers receiving welfare are high school dropouts and 27% of all single mothers lacking a high school diploma receive public assistance. Furthermore, according to the National Dropout Prevention Center, 82% of prison inmates are high school dropouts.
Partner schools refer some of their most challenging students to the program because of WFDC's 23-year track record of helping disabled, economically disadvantaged and/or troubled youth stay in school and earn the credits they need to graduate. Student trainees that successfully complete the program leave with knowledge, skills, confidence, and work experience necessary to become gainfully employed and self-supporting as they enter adulthood.
The vast majority of our students have diagnosed physical, mental, or cognitive disabilities and come from low-income families. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, our students are identified as “High Poverty". The average Free and Reduced Lunch rate (a youth poverty indicator) for the 36 schools from which we draw is 30% which for HS students, qualifies as a Title One school. Currently, 48% of WFDC trainees qualify for Free Lunch, which indicates that the family household income falls below the federal poverty level – clearly demonstrating the level of need among our student trainees. Since HS students often do not request Free Lunch, we can reasonably expect that the number of our trainees living in poverty is significantly higher than what is reported. For that reason, we have laundry and shower facilities available to our students as well as food and clothing for those that may not arrive at WFDC “ready to work" with a professional appearance.

Financials

WORK FORCE DEVELOPMENT AGENCY A RESOURCE CENTER FOR OUR FUTURE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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WORK FORCE DEVELOPMENT AGENCY A RESOURCE CENTER FOR OUR FUTURE

Board of directors
as of 1/18/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Brian Pulk

Honeywell Aerospace - Retired

Term: 2020 - 2023

Clark Johnson

Honeywell Aerospace - Retired

Daryl Connite

Boeing

Michael McMurray

Raymond James Financial Services

Kim Rider

Cole Wathen Leid Hall

Larry Springer

Fed Ex Airline Captain - Retired

Vicky Hopper

Lynnwood HS Vocational Coordinator - Retired

Crystal Fry

Attorney

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/18/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data