Recreation, Sports, Leisure, Athletics

NORTHWEST THERAPEUTIC RIDING CENTER

Giving a Leg Up to people of all abilities

aka NWTRC

Bellingham, WA

Mission

"Giving a Leg Up to people of all abilities"
In the horse world, a “leg up" means to give someone a boost onto their horse. At the riding center the boost carries them not just onto their horses back, but into their lives.

Ruling Year

1993

Executive Director

Julia Bozzo

Main Address

1884 Kelly Road

Bellingham, WA 98226 USA

Keywords

animals, equine-assisted activities and therapies, EAAT, disabilities, therapeutic riding, recreation, adapted sports, health, wellness

EIN

91-1556276

 Number

6401005828

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Equestrian, Riding (N69)

Animal Related Activities N.E.C. (D99)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

NorthWest Therapeutic Riding Center (NWTRC) was established in 1993 to address the need for recreational activities for people with disabilities in Northwest Washington. Starting with one therapy horse and two participants, NWTRC has grown to serve 100 unique individuals a year, with the help of 6 therapy horses, two full-time staff and over 100 volunteers. Our “in-between" size is a strength, large enough to have the equine-assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) expertise to fit the challenges faced by our participants, yet small enough to establish a relationship with each individual.
Involvement at the NWTRC opens new avenues for participants and volunteers to enhance their relationships and connections to our community, to enjoy the multitude of physical benefits, to make new friends and help establish lifelong healthy habits.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

3

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Adaptive Horseback Riding Lessons

Lesson Volunteer Program

Adaptive Horsemanship Program

Where we work

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

CORE PURPOSES
1. Provide an environment where participants can realize their potential through empowerment and independence.
2. Foster and encourage the unique bond between horses and humans.
3. Be a model of best practices for the Equine-Assisted Activities and Therapy field.

CORE VALUES
1. Provide safe, effective and fun horseback riding and equine-assisted activities to people of all abilities.
2. Provide a compassionate, caring, nurturing and respectful environment for the NWTRC community.
3. Provide an accessible program which overcomes physical, emotional and financial barriers.
4. Provide a well maintained facility and well cared for animals.
5. Provide expertise and knowledge of therapeutic riding and other equine-assisted activities.
6. Provide a strong and sustainable organization through fiscal responsibility.

NorthWest Therapeutic Riding Center operates a lean and ethical organization, making it possible for us to provide equine-assisted activities at an affordable cost to our participants. Volunteer time donated by our board of directors, stable, lesson and event volunteers allow us to accomplish our mission while keeping expenses low. NWTRC has wonderful sponsors who help to defray the costs of our program. Our sponsors include: Elenbaas Co., Kulshan Vet Hospital, Total Saddle Fit and Web Rodeo.

NorthWest Therapeutic Riding Center was established in 1993 to address the need for recreational activities for people with disabilities in Whatcom County. Starting with one therapy horse and two participants, NWTRC has grown to serve 100 unique individuals a year, with the help of 6 therapy horses, two full-time staff and over 100 volunteers. Our “in-between" size is a strength, large enough to have equine-assisted activities and therapies (EAAT) expertise to fit the challenges faced by our participants, yet small enough to establish a relationship with each individual. NWTRC is a Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International Premier Center, one of only 272 in the world. PATH has evaluated NWTRC and found it to meet the best practices for health and safety of participants, volunteers, horses and staff. These standards ensure that our organization promotes the well-being of all participants and equines. In our 27 years, NWTRC has mobilized hundreds of volunteers as we provide thousands of hours of equine-assisted activities. Three of our horses have been nationally recognized, and numerous volunteers have been honored for their service to the organization.

-By completing 80% of our goal specific objectives
-Meeting our fundraising goals for each event
-Tracking our participants progress through our five outcome domains
-Participant retention rate

NWTRC's adaptive horsemanship and riding program is growing rapidly and we now have a waitlist. NWTRC is in the process of raising funds for a new 16'x30' multi-use building, the "Stable Classroom". The “Stable Classroom”, will tie together the multidimensional services of the NWTRC in an indoor, state-of-the-art environmentally conscious facility. The project will create a welcoming space for warm-up exercises for participants, an area to accommodate therapy sessions, unmounted activities, volunteer training, staff office, board meetings, group retreats and educational classes. The multi-use building is designed to look like the inside of a barn, and will be heated by compost from our horses. The building will be heated using a “passive system.” Heat will be generated from a composting bin, with piping from the bin to the building’s concrete floor. A standard pumping system used in home floor heating systems will transfer heated water from the source to the building. The composter will use horse manure from the program horses. Once composted, the material will be spread on pastures. This unique system is being designed and built by NWTRC board member and engineer Mike Bozzo. The Stable Classroom will diversify programming and meet rising demand for services and reduce the carbon footprint of the NWTRC by using sustainable materials and the passive compost system described above.

How We Listen

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

Source: Self-reported by organization

the feedback loop
check_box We shared information about our current feedback practices.
How is the organization collecting feedback?
We regularly collect feedback through: electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), paper surveys.
How is the organization using feedback?
We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.
With whom is the organization sharing feedback?
We share feedback with: the people we serve, our staff, our board, our funders, our community partners.
What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?
It is difficult to: it is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, we don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, it is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, it is difficult to get honest feedback from our clients.

External Reviews

Awards

Premier Accredited Center 2013

PATH (Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship) International

Dutch Treat - Region 9 Therapeutic Equine of the Year 2012

PATH (Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship) International

Kleng - National Therapeutic Equine of the Year 2009

PATH (Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship) International

Kleng - Humanitarian Equine 2013

Horse Stars Hall of Fame

Kurt - Region 9 Therapeutic Equine of the Year 2006

PATH (Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship) International

Mike Bozzo - Region 9 Volunteer of the Year 2018

PATH (Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship) International

Julia Bozzo - Region 9 Certified Professional of the Year 2019

PATH (Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship) International

Kleng - Platinum Performance Horse Welfare Award Winner 2019

Equus Foundation

Henry - Region 9 Equine of the Year 2020

PATH (Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship) International

Affiliations & Memberships

North American Riding for the Handicapped Association 1993

American Quarter Horse Association 2012

Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International 2011

Photos

Financials

NORTHWEST THERAPEUTIC RIDING CENTER

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

See what's included

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Not Applicable

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

No

Organizational Demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? This organization has voluntarily shared information to answer this important question and to support sector-wide learning. GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/13/2020

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & Ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender Identity
Female, Not Transgender (Cisgender)
Sexual Orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability Status
Person without a disability

Race & Ethnicity

Gender Identity

Sexual Orientation

No data

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity Strategies

Last updated: 03/13/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Policies and processes

done
We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
done
We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
done
We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
done
We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.