PLATINUM2023

Page Ahead Childrens Literacy Program

Giving kids in need the chance to read.

Mission

Guided by the fact that literacy is essential to lifelong success, Page Ahead provides new books and develops reading activities that empower at-risk children. Founded in 1990, Page Ahead has given more than 3.5 million new books to more than 950,000 children through collaborations with schools, social service agencies, preschools, and early childhood programs across Washington. A child who is not reading at grade level by the time they finish third grade has only a 10 percent chance of ever catching up. Currently, only about 1/3 of low-income third graders in Washington are meeting that standard. Through our programs, we work to erase the early reading gap for children in communities of concentrated low income before it becomes an “achievement” gap.

Ruling year info

1993

Executive Director

Ms. Susan Dibble

Main address

1130 NW 85th St

Seattle, WA 98117 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Books for Kids

EIN

91-1600084

NTEE code info

Remedial Reading, Reading Encouragement (B92)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (O01)

Remedial Reading, Reading Encouragement (B92)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

A child needs to be reading at grade level by the time they complete third grade. By then, they need to be reading well enough to understand a text, and then apply what they have learned. If they cannot, they risk failure in every subject, from science to social studies. In Washington State last year, only 36% of low-income third graders met standard in reading. Children raised in poverty, those with limited proficiency in English, those from homes where the parents' reading levels and practices are low, are at increased risk of reading failure. Research has shown there are two major factors that contribute to poor reading outcomes: a lack of reading exposure before kindergarten, and a failure to read during summer break—known as summer setback, or summer learning loss—after entering elementary school. Page Ahead's work focuses on these two key periods in a child's reading development--helping children become kindergarten ready and preventing loss of reading skill in summer.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Books for Kids

Books for Kids provides new books and literacy services. Families who are living at or below the federal poverty level struggle to secure basic items such as food and housing for their families. There is often no money for extras like books. Page Ahead brings books to those children who would otherwise go without to foster a lifelong love of reading. Page Ahead works with dozens of partner sites (elementary schools, social service agencies, etc.) to build capacity in their literacy programs and hold reading events where books are distributed and children are motivated and excited to read. Page Ahead also manages a network of custom-designed Little Free Libraries for kids in Seattle neighborhoods that are "book deserts" called Book Oasis; each Book Oasis is refilled monthly with brand-new kids' books to serve as an additional pipeline of reading material for babies through young adults in each community.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Each summer, during the annual hiatus from school, student reading skills often decline. This phenomenon is sometimes called “summer slide” or “summer reading setback.” It impacts children living in poverty the most, and its effects are cumulative. It is estimated that up to two-thirds of the reading achievement gap experienced by low-income children happens during the summer months.

What is Book Up Summer?
• Book Up Summer (BUS) is an evidence-based reading intervention designed to help mitigate the summer reading setback often experienced by children of low socio-economic status (SES). The goals of BUS are to increase the reading volume and voluntary reading activity of participating students over the summer months and ultimately—keep young students from losing ground in reading skill while out of school.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

All children love hearing stories. But reading to children can be more than just entertaining. Story Leaders utilizes strategies proven to increase language development and enables students to take a more active role in reading, substantially increasing their early reading skills and ultimately, their kindergarten readiness. Story Leaders is currently in pilot, serving approximately 750 low-income children and families through our partnership with seven early learning centers across Washington.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Where we work

Awards

Afterschool Hall of Fame Award 2012

Lights On Afterschool

Evergreen Award 2006

Executive Alliance

Golden Apple Award 2005

KCTS

Literary Lions Award 2004

King County Library System

State Literacy Award 2021

Library of Congress

Affiliations & memberships

Independent Charities of America 2000

Chamber of Commerce 2009

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students showing improvement in test scores

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, At-risk youth

Related Program

Book Up Summer

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students who demonstrate improved overall literacy

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Infants and toddlers

Related Program

Story Leaders

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

From teacher and parent surveys of pre-K students.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The following five goals are goals of our mission and programs.

To increase low-income students' kindergarten readiness
To spark children's interest in reading
To increase the time children spend reading
To increase access to books for low-income students
To decrease the amount of learning loss that takes place in the summer

Prevent summer learning loss -
Summer learning loss is the leading contributor to the achievement gap between low income children and their more affluent peers. Page Ahead’s Book Up Summer program ensures children gain access to self-selected books each summer break during their primary years. This evidence-based intervention helps kids maintain their reading skill and return to school in the fall ready to learn.

Ensure children start school with foundational literacy skills -
Students who are unprepared to start school often fall behind, leaving them unable to read well by the end of 3rd grade. Engaging and providing support to parents is crucial to create an environment that gives kids a strong start in reading.

We achieve this goal through our Story Leader and Story Time programs.

Founded in 1990, Page Ahead has given more than 4 million new books to more than 1 million children through collaborations with schools, social service agencies, preschools, and early childhood programs across Washington. For more than thirty years Page Ahead Children's Literacy Program has been breaking down barriers to achievement for children in need. We have grown from a single book giveaway project in King County to a comprehensive literacy organization serving more than 20,000 students in 18 counties across Washington. Page Ahead is now the leading provider of children's books and literacy services in the state, as well as a nationally top-ranked ranked early childhood education program on Charity Navigator.

Our programs are based on well-reviewed research around effective literacy interventions and the difference reading skills can make in combating educational inequities. Several years ago, the Institute of Education Sciences reviewed 90 education interventions since 2002, and found 88 percent had weak or no positive effects. Only 12 percent of the interventions reviewed by the IES have shown any positive effect. One of the few interventions shown to be effective was the study on which our program Book Up Summer is based. Despite the model’s proven success, Page Ahead is the only organization doing work like this at a statewide level.

Page Ahead is the leading provider of children's books and literacy services in Washington State, serving more than 1 million children with 4 million new books since 1990. We add thousands of students to our programs every year, and anticipate reaching more than 20,000 Washington children in concentrated low-income communities in the 2022–23 school year.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To hear what has changed for them while participating in our program over the course of the year, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

Page Ahead Childrens Literacy Program
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Page Ahead Childrens Literacy Program

Board of directors
as of 03/21/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Cathy Peterson

Wayfair

Term: 2018 - 2024

Daniel Frankel

WealthCollab

Cathy Peterman

Wayfair

Mark Fitzgerald

T-Mobile

Jim Griffin

The Pokemon Company International

Lydia Islan

F5

Arden Leland

AuditBoard

Briony Pentecost

Banner Bank

Molly Powell

US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

Kirsten Scheide

Boeing

Megan Wells

Ankura

Teresa Osborn

University of Washington School of Pharmacy

Sahit Garapati

Kimberly-Clark

Suann Harris

Northwest Farm Credit Services

Kasi Walker

Kitsap County Prosecutor's Office

Ying Zhao

EY

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/21/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/21/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.