Red Feather Development Group

Everyone deserves a healthy home

aka Red Feather   |   Flagstaff, AZ   |  www.redfeather.org

Mission

Red Feather envisions a world where healthy and safe housing is available to all. We partner with Native American tribes and nations to develop and implement sustainable solutions to their housing needs. For over 25 years Red Feather has been working to make Native American homes healthier through education, empowering workshops, and in the cases of elderly or disabled homeowners, building them new homes or facilitating repairs.

Ruling year info

1995

Executive Director

Mr. Joe Seidenberg

Main address

2501 N. 4th Street

Flagstaff, AZ 86004 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-1632134

NTEE code info

Housing Rehabilitation (L25)

Health Support Services (E60)

Rural (S32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Today there are over 1 million tribal members residing on American Indian reservations, 40% of whom live in homes that do not meet the federal standard for “adequate housing”. This compares to just 6% of the rest of the US population living in substandard housing. These conditions can exacerbate and even cause chronic health conditions, making it difficult to perform the tasks of daily living or be productive at work or school.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Healthy Homes Workshop Series

The intent of the DIY courses is to empower homeowners with the knowledge, skills, and materials to improve their own homes and the health of all of its occupants. Through a combination of classroom education and hands-on-learning, tribal members learn how to independently identify safety risks and repair their homes. Upon successful completion of a workshop, tribal members earn a DIY Kit that provides them with basic materials and tools to implement the repairs learned during the workshop.

Population(s) Served
Families
Indigenous peoples

NHRN links homeowners with a Red Feather case manager who helps identify critical housing repair needs such as mold mitigation or handicap accessibility, and helps the homeowner find available resources to address them. Candidates for this program are typically not capable of solving the problem themselves, either because they are physically not able, or because the project requires professional expertise. Case Management services include: grant and loan application assistance to fund the work, identification of professional services within the community to do the work, and if needed assistance throughout the project. The program also provides opportunity to build local economies through workforce development training. Prioritization to participate in the program is given to the elderly, veterans, disabled, and families with children suffering from health issues.

Population(s) Served
Families
Indigenous peoples

Red Feather facilitates health and safety home repairs for low income Hopi and Navajo families. Examples of the types of services provided under this program include handicap accessibility upgrades, weatherization, heating systems change-outs , and roofing, electrical, and plumbing repairs. This work is made possible through a combination of federal, corporate, and private grants and service contracts.

Population(s) Served
Families
Indigenous peoples

Where we work

Awards

Top-rated Nonprofit! 2021

Great Nonprofits

Affiliations & memberships

Arizona Alliance of Nonprofits 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people no longer living in unsafe or substandard housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, American Indians, Families, Low-income people

Related Program

Home Improvements and Weatherization

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This represents the number of Health and Safety Housing Repairs Red Feather has carried out for Hopi and Navajo tribal members. The total number of repairs for the program period 2018-2020 is 150.

Number of Accessibility Ramps provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors, American Indians, People with physical disabilities, Chronically ill people, Low-income people

Related Program

Native Home Repair Network (NHRN)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In the program period of 2018-2020 Red Feather installed 27 total ramps for elders or accessibility impaired individuals on the Hopi and Navajo reservations

Number of Heating System Upgrades or Interventions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, American Indians, Low-income people, Extremely poor people

Related Program

Home Improvements and Weatherization

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In the program period 2018-2020 Red Feather provided: 171 Heating System Replacements 130 Firewood Deliveries 133 Home Weatherizations

Number of older adults being supported to live at home through home care, assistive technology, and/or personal support plans

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors, American Indians, Low-income people

Related Program

Native Home Repair Network (NHRN)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This represents the number of tribal elders who have received an Aging in Place kit to allow them to safely age at home.

Number of treatment and support plans that specify how individual and family strengths will be used and developed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, American Indians, Low-income people

Related Program

Native Home Repair Network (NHRN)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This is the total number of Client Consultations carried out in the program period 2018-2020. Each client consultation in our Native Home Resource Network program identifies family strengths

Number of clients participating in educational programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, American Indians, Caregivers, Single parents, Low-income people

Related Program

Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Healthy Homes Workshop Series

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This represents the total metric of 236 Education workshop graduates and Healthy Home Kits dispersed in the program period 2018-2020

Number of health education trainings conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, American Indians, Low-income people

Related Program

Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Healthy Homes Workshop Series

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This represents the total 34 Education Workshops delivered on a variety of Home Health issues in the program period 2018-2020. Note that the COVID 19 pandemic/shutdown stopped all in person workshops

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Red Feather is a part of the solution to the housing crisis on the Hopi and Navajo Nations. We are a partner with tribal organizations to ensure the self-determination of American Indians to have healthy homes. Red Feather educates and empowers homeowners to solve their own problems.

First, we educate and host hands-on skills training workshops for homeowners and professional trades people. Outside of Indian Country there is a misunderstanding of the housing crisis that exists across most American Indian Reservations. Part of our fund raising strategy is to bring light to the need and change misperceptions. We also educate people living on reservations about how things like mold and coal stove smoke can contribute to lung diseases like asthma, which is twice as prevalent on reservations. Second, Red Feather empowers homeowners to take on home repairs and weatherization. We teach workshops like Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Home Weatherization and Women's DIY Home Repair. The classes involve discussion of health and safety concerns and then a hands on portion where the students practice the new skills on fellow students' homes. Students receive kits with materials to begin work on their own homes. We also empower homeowners in need of home repair by linking them to available sources of funding and providing professional local referrals for the work. Finally, when all resources and education has been exhausted, and where a homeowner is elderly or disabled, Red Feather may actually take a more active role in ensuring health and safety needs are met, including raising additional funding and managing work crews ourselves. Whenever possible we hire local crews and take the opportunity to provide any business or professional training that is requested and that we can assist with.

Red Feather has a diverse array of staffing with applicable expertise for being successful at our work. We strive to hire individuals that represent the cultural values of the communities we serve. Additionally, we look for the most qualified individuals-those that have skills in housing, health, community development, education, accounting, fund development, other areas as needed. We also have a wide network of professional contract labors (both native and non-native) and specialized consultants that we leverage to provide the best programs and services we can. Current staff bios can be accessed on our Red Feather's website.

For the first of our 20 years we focused mainly on building and teaching Native Americans how to build sustainable new homes such a straw bale houses. Over the course of that time we built over 20 homes in Montana and Arizona. Each one not only represented a new healthy home for one family but it served as an opportunity for learning and for cultural exchange between volunteers from outside the community and members of the community. After listening carefully to the tribal entities of the Northern Cheyenne, Hopi and Navajo nations, we understand there is a need to salvage and make healthier the existing housing stock. We have begun educating and empowering able-bodied people to repair their homes and install wheelchair ramps for the less able-bodied. The need for our services clearly outstrips our ability to reach everyone in need.

In the program period from 2018 to 2021 Red Feather built 27 accessibility ramps, provided 133 home weatherizations, made over 130 firewood deliveries, carried out 150 general housing repairs, provided 171 heating replacements, delivered over 600 handwashing stations, provided 34 education workshops totaling 236 workshop graduates and Healthy Home kits dispersed, and provided 478 client consultations and 231 home inspections.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The target population for this Red Feather programs are Hopi and Navajo families that live on their native homelands. There is a mountain of evidence that demonstrates how American Indian communities, are disproportionately impacted by poor housing conditions. 40% of Native families live in housing that is deemed "substandard" compared with 6% of the general US population. Further evidence demonstrates how poor housing conditions can have damaging impacts on occupant health and how interventions can decrease these risks.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Most Hopi and Navajo families are dependent upon coal and wood to heat their homes. Solid fuel burning in the home can release high levels of pollution resulting in poor indoor air quality and a host of health complications, including a high death rate from COVID-19. Families that choose not to use solid fuels, turn to dangerous and expensive heating alternatives like electric space heaters, and unvented propane and kerosene heaters. We received feedback that through our Case Management program that reliable, affordable heating options was a huge need. Red Feather adapted our heating program to include the installation of solar furnaces and mini-splits, while also providing HEPA filters to improve indoor air quality for those still reliant on burning solid fuels.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    All of Red Feather's services have become increasingly client-led. The evolution of our Native Home Resource Network, which is the case-management portion of our services, has become central to accessing all other programs. This case-management model is client-directed, and the client's lived experience and their evaluation of their needs is what drives the prioritization of services provided. Red Feather also hosts Listening Sessions at the Villages and Chapter Houses, which are open sessions for community feedback and direction on our services. The information gathered from these sessions and from each case-management client is reviewed, as are all additional comments the organization receives about needs in the community, is what drives our program development and adaptation.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Red Feather Development Group
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Red Feather Development Group

Board of directors
as of 9/14/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Chrystel Cornelius

CEO- Oweesta Corporation

Term: 2016 - 2019

Mark Hall

Former Red Feather ED

Meghan Raftery

RedCloud Consulting

Sarah Echohawk

AISES - American Indian Science & Engineering Society

Eunice Begay

Senior Program and Projects Specialist, Navajo Nation

Gene Kuwanquaftewa

Hopi Nation, Member

Victor Burrola

Wells Fargo President, Community Development Officer, AZ

Kenneth Myers

Lead Faculty, Coconino Community College

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/14/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/14/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.