National Fisheries Conservation Center

Protecting Seafood at the Source

aka Global Ocean Health   |   Seattle, WA   |  fisheriesconservation.org

Mission

NFCC supports collaborative efforts to improve marine resource management and conservation. Our main program is Global Ocean Health, focused on ocean acidification and related challenges to healthy fisheries, oceans, and coastal communities.

Notes from the nonprofit

National Fisheries Conservation Center is an agile and innovative non-profit, focused on assisting fishermen, tribes, coastal communities, governments and others who rely on abundant oceans. We define and identify solutions for emerging problems, and help waterfront leaders become their own champions. By functioning as a lean and adaptive organization we keep our overhead costs low, ensuring that funds go directly where they're needed most: protecting seafood at the source, and ensuring the health of the ocean that feeds us all. Known for our collaborative problem-solving and deep relationships with the seafood industry, tribes, and coastal communities, NFCC recently celebrated its 25 year anniversary.

Ruling year info

1997

Director, Global Ocean Health

Mr. Brad Warren

Main address

PO Box 30615

Seattle, WA 98113 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

91-1686596

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

NFCC works to protect healthy oceans and fisheries through collaborative problem-solving. Climate change, particularly the effects of carbon pollution, are causing many negative consequences to our oceans, including acidification, warming, harmful algal blooms, lack of oxygen in the water, and species shift. Our Global Ocean Health program specifically focuses on adaptation and remediation of these changing ocean conditions.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Coastal Planning for a Changing Sea

This conservation project will educate decision makers to catalyze planning for sea level rise (SLR) and ocean acidification (OA), including the transition from farmlands to salt marsh. Phase I seeks to measurably advance self-organized community planning initiatives to enhance resilience on our changing coast by: 1) highlighting and removing “blind spots” (data gaps) that prevent effective planning for these climate-related changes, 2) providing visual products for decision-support, 3) sharing this work with our community-based collaborators who are engaged in key planning processes, and 4) aligning this effort with national initiatives to anticipate and plan for SLR (e.g. the Risky Business Project, TNC's Coastal Resilience project, and others). This project has been focused in Washington state so far.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Focused primarily on ocean acidification (OA), the Global Ocean Health program is a program of the National Fisheries Conservation Center. The program’s mission is to protect seafood supplies, coastal communities and marine ecosystems from ocean acidification and related impacts by enabling people and businesses that depend on these resources to confront the causes and consequences of this devastating, pollution-induced threat.

Our strategy is based on a simple axiom: Those who earn a living from healthy seas can exert a powerful influence for policies to protect them. We do not lobby. Instead, we help resource-dependent people acquire the skill and knowledge to shape stronger policy themselves. As advocates for stronger science, adaptation measures, and pollution controls, fishermen and seafood growers command attention, often on both sides of the political aisle. They bring “on-the-water credibility” and economic relevance to the table.

Few seafood producers or other resource stakeholders have the technical or policy skills to grapple effectively with acidification on their own. To help them confront this challenge, we provide scientific and strategic support. We organize training, technical and policy guidance, and sometimes funding to enable them to reliably document impacts of acidification and to become sure-footed champions of their own cause.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of individuals in the target audience that expresses intent to adopt (or continue) desired behavior

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Work status and occupations

Related Program

Global Ocean Health program

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To help stakeholders and coastal communities fight, adapt to, and mitigate the effects of ocean acidifiation, sea level rise, and ocean warming.

The most compelling narratives come from those on the front lines. We give them the tools they need to tell their stories to policy and decision-makers, with a solid grouding of the science behind it.

We have all worked in the marine field for decades (collectively, over 100 years). We have established relationships with fishermen and seafood companies and associations who will not speak to other organizations they consider to be "environmental." We've earned their respect and carry a lot of credibility with this key audience.

We've made incredible progress. Please see the Accomplishments section at globaloceanhealth.org to learn more.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We started holding an annual seafood feast fundraiser where our supporters and those interested in learning more can come and have a great time while learning about our current programs and enjoying the bounty of the ocean.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

National Fisheries Conservation Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

National Fisheries Conservation Center

Board of directors
as of 5/14/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Brad Warren

Suzanne Iudicello Martley

Iudicello & Assoc Consulting

Mark Gleason

ioCurrents

Brad Warren

Sustainable Fisheries Partnership

Martin Hall

Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission

Brad Matsen

Independent Writer & Photographer

Thane Tiensen

Landye Bennett Blumstein

Terry Williams

Tulalip Tribes

Samuel Chen

Hudson Valley Fish Farms

Jessica Hathaway

National Fisherman

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/14/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability